Traditions, belief systems and practices of Australians, including celebrations, compared with those of Korea
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Traditions, belief systems and practices of Australians, including celebrations, compared with those of Korea
Teaching resources for HSIE Stage 3 students, learning about culture and culture diversity of Australia, compared with another nation in the Asia-Pacific
Curated by Ashley Pladson
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3. How much do you know about Australians today?

3. How much do you know about Australians today? | Traditions, belief systems and practices of Australians, including celebrations, compared with those of Korea | Scoop.it
Ashley Pladson's insight:

This online quiz, derived from the Making Multicultural Australia website, is a good way to assess where students are at regarding their knowledge of Australia as a culture, through their general knowledge or awareness of current discussion topics in the media.

I believe the test is at a good level for stage 3, where students would have enough knowledge to determine some of the correct answers or at least make an educated guess, as well as at times challenging them. Therefore, prompting discussion and a basis for further learning. The quiz brings in elements of immigration, aboriginal culture, languages and religions.

When using this interactive online quiz in the classroom, I feel that the best way to conduct it would be either as a class where the teacher reads out the quiz and the students individually provide the answer. As I stated before, this prompts class discussion in deciding on the correct answer. The other way this activity would be successful is working in partners, where collaboration would be key to discussing a topic and achieving the correct answer. Whichever way the activity is conducted, the next step would be to take the results, shown as a percentage, and graph them incorporating a numeracy element. From here, education on the topic begins.  

Other good resources for teaching culture and identity, multicultural education and diversity can also be found of the Making Multicultural website, www.multiculturalaustralia.edu.au

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My Place Asia Australia

My Place Asia Australia | Traditions, belief systems and practices of Australians, including celebrations, compared with those of Korea | Scoop.it
Ashley Pladson's insight:

This painting, drawn by a 7th grader, is a brilliant representation of a Korean tradition and celebration. When describing the painting, the student said it was of people participating in the “gang-gang-sul-lae”, also known as the Korean Circle Dance. This dance is traditional of Korean Thanksgiving or Chuseok, which is celebrated on the 15th day of the 8th month of the lunar calendar.  It is the harvest festival, celebrated for 3 days in total, where Koreans give thanks to the first rice harvest of the year. The dancing figures under a full moon sky give an insight into how a celebration and tradition is looked at, or depicted in another culture.

 

When using this image in the classroom, I would provide a tactile activity to support this topic. An activity I would include as a good way to get students thinking about traditions and celebrations is to think about what their favourite celebration or tradition is, in their own culture. I’m including this because in the example, the artist states that “I drew this because I’ve never had as much fun as when I did this”. This will then identify Australian traditions and celebrations such as Australia Day or Christmas for example, as well as cultures from around the world, comparing it to the example from Korea. Before beginning this task, I want students to look at the Korean Thanksgiving painting and note all the elements which depict a tradition and celebration. Once they have done that, students will paint or draw what they see happening and what needs to be included at their chosen celebration, focussing on the elements discussed about the Korean example.  Their creative paintings or drawings will then be displayed around the room to show the different backgrounds our students come from, therefore identifying multiculturalism in our classroom. It is also a good starting off point to looking at the traditions, beliefs and practices of our Australian culture. 

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K-Pop tunes Australia into Korean culture

K-Pop tunes Australia into Korean culture | Traditions, belief systems and practices of Australians, including celebrations, compared with those of Korea | Scoop.it

"Korean pop culture has jumped a language hurdle to win a place in the West, with the help of pop star PSY"

...The influence another culture in the Asia-Pacific has on Australia. 

Ashley Pladson's insight:

This very recent article published in the Brisbane Times on April 15th 2013 refers to one of the biggest influences to come out of Korea today, and that is the rapidly growing phenomenon of Korean pop culture music, also known as K-Pop. First established in Korea in the 90’s, K Pop is a genre taking over Australian radio waves, mainly due to the huge success of singer PSY, who sat on Australian billboard charts for over a month and became the most watched Youtube clip ever with his hit single “Gangham Style”.

 

Written by Korean author Jin Soo Kim, who describes the hope he has on K-pop rectifying Korean culture within Australia. Over recent years, the Korean culture has been seen in Australian society, not just in the form of music, but also with its food, television and events, such as the Korean National Foundation Day and The Year of Friendship, celebrated in 2011. Because HSIE stage 3 students are hugely influenced by avenues such as music, it is definitely important to reference cultural influence in regards to a subject they are familiar with. By resonating with a subject, in this case, K-Pop, students are able to better grasp the topic of cultural influence of an Asian-pacific region to Australia and realise the importance of understanding their own culture and that of others. Hence the relevance of this particular newspaper article as a resource for educating students. 

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The Yarning Circle: the Let's Have A Yarn With Yarn program

The Yarning Circle: the Let's Have A Yarn With Yarn program | Traditions, belief systems and practices of Australians, including celebrations, compared with those of Korea | Scoop.it
Information on the Yarning Circle's innovative educational program, Let's Have A Yarn With Yarn, which uses traditional Aboriginal storytelling techniques.
Ashley Pladson's insight:

“The Yarning Circle” is a website and concept created by Lee Townsend, an aboriginal woman from Blacktown, NSW who established this idea to encourage students to “have a yarn with yarn!” Stemming from Aboriginal culture where traditional dreamtime stories of the land, sea and its people, were told by sitting around a campfire, this practice was passed down through generations enabling all members of the tribe to have voice and to be heard.  Through an Aboriginal perspective, Lee had a vision of continuing this tradition of storytelling, but in a way best suited to contemporary Australia. We then can continue to pass on our stories and our knowledge through a verbal learning circle.

 

Every culture has their own unique way of storytelling, and therefore practices such as this can also be seen when looking at a region of the Asia-pacific, such as Korea. In Korea, they have the tradition of storytelling through song. This is known as Pansori, a form of sung folk narrative.

 

By incorporating an idea and resource such as this in the classroom, we are not only practicing something that is done in all cultures across the globe but we are also better identifying ourselves with Australia’s own Aboriginal heritage. For this concept to be successful, students are divided into groups and yarn distributed between them. The activity which involves each student holding a piece of the yarn, are instructed to, one by one, share with the group a story of their own family traditions. This personal element encourages students to bring their own personal experiences, background and culture to the group. They in turn, will stay engaged in the activity through the interaction of group work. 

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"The Asian Century"

"The Asian Century" | Traditions, belief systems and practices of Australians, including celebrations, compared with those of Korea | Scoop.it

Behind The News 
"Where will Australia fit in the Asian century?" 

Ashley Pladson's insight:

Viewing this news report on the educational news broadcasting program for school students, Behind The News, is a valuable resource  in understanding the recent discussions of how we are moving into the Asian century. This is cultural influence on a global scale. Globalisation surrounds an understanding of “complex social, economic and political links between people, and the impact that changes have on others”(Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. 2011, p.368).  “The Asian Century”, as reported by journalist Sarah Larsen, begins by looking at how Australia as a nation will fit into the transition of Asia as the new powerhouse of the world, and then how exactly this will affect us. The last hundred years, it has been all about the American century, but the idea is that in years to come it’ll be Asian countries we turn to for politics, economics and culture. With this being said, languages are the topic discussed at great depth. Politicians are saying that being able to say hello and goodbye in another language might not be enough in the future, and therefore are wanting every student to be studying an Asian language and learning about its’ culture.

 

The report also references the White Paper, the formal document released on October 28th 2012 with a proposition of being Asia capable by 2025. Therefore as a homework task for example, it would be good for students to go to the website and explore the papers provided to gain a deeper understanding of this topic, remembering that “building the Asia capabilities of young Australians, will be central to Australia’s future prosperity”(Asia Education Foundation, n.d).

 

Asia Education Foundation. (n.d). Australia in the asian century white paper. Retrieved from http://www.asiaeducation.edu.au/policy_and_research/australia_in_the_asian_century_landing_page.html.

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching society and environment. (4th ed.). South Melbourne, Vic: Cengage Learning. 

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