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A concise city travel guide for photographers | Ming Thein

A concise city travel guide for photographers | Ming Thein | Tourism and Travel | Scoop.it


I’ve been to a lot of places both in the course of my previous life as a wandering professional, as well as more recently as a photographer and occasionally as a tourist. I’ve visited most as a business traveller first, but with a constantly vigilant eye for photographic opportunities. On the whole, some places are more photo-friendly than others; however, every city has its interesting places. What follows is a very brief photography travel guide to some of the more interesting places I’ve been to. It’s organized by city, in alphabetical order. MT


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Dennis Isip's curator insight, April 26, 2013 8:47 PM

I have very little comment, because this author has been to a lot more places than I have. It wouldn't be fair for me to express my opinion about a city that I've never been to. Nevertheless, if I had an immediate plan to visit one of the places he's describing, then I'll definitely take his thoughts into consideration.

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Travel Photography in Vietnam | Adam Riley

Travel Photography in Vietnam | Adam Riley | Tourism and Travel | Scoop.it



Readers of my facebook page will be well aware that last month, Laura and I were travelling around Vietnam. The purpose of the trip wasn’t travel photography in Vietnam, but to explore and meet people from this fabulous country, eat some nice food, and drink some good cocktails. That is exactly what we did and along the way I tried to capture the spirit and essence of the country as best as I could through the viewfinder. I took along my Fuji XPro 1, and despite meeting the concrete from a decent height on two occasions, it performed admirably, and I thoroughly enjoyed not lugging around a large SLR and a selection of heavy lenses! Laura carried the Fuji x20 and I hope to blog some of her images soon, as I’ve had many requests for further images with this little camera since my review a few weeks ago.

 

Vietnam is a country featuring a multitude of very different landscapes and ways of living, making it a photographer’s dream in terms of capturing varied images within one trip. However each area had its own set of challenges when it came to shooting. We started our trip in the capital, Hanoi. It is the definition of ‘hustle and bustle’, with street sellers galore, and more scooters than you can imagine. Interesting photo opportunities are in abundance but the difficulty then lies in finding a ‘clean’ shot, some early morning starts were definitely required here! Conversely, the idyllic hill town of Bac Ha, which we reached via an interesting overnight train has a more simple way of life – buffalo’s are used to plough the fields, and double up as commuter vehicles for the kids! Here, we were challenged by the weather as thick mist often covered the beautiful landscape. However the times when it lifted slightly added an extra layer of ‘rustic charm’ to the images captured. From here we hopped on a junk around the karst islands of Halong Bay, seeing some spectacular landscapes, before flying to the more commercialised Hoi An, which still manages to retains its charm and was one of our favourite places. A quick stop over in the westernised and modern Ho Chi Minh (formally Saigon), before a rain filled visit to the waterways and floating markets of the Mekong Delta. Finally we chilled out on the beaches around the stunning island of Phu Quoc – enjoying warm waters, sun and a few beers!

 

From the bustling cities, to the colourful hill tribes, we enjoyed; green tea with builders, crazy scooter rides, lost wedding rings (mine!), flying fish, pigs on bus roofs, frogs legs, beautiful sunrises and lots more. We visited as much of Vietnam as possible and had an amazing time. We met lots of lovely locals and equally lovely fellow travellers,  I can highly recommend a visit to this happy, colourful, friendly, interesting and lively place!

 

The common thread throughout the trip was the interaction between the locals, strong family bonds and close knit communities, working and socialising together. As I take a similar approach to my travel photography as that for my wedding photography, focussing on the people and telling a story with my images was my photographic aim. I took a fair few shots during the trip, and have narrowed it down to my favourite 50 that represent the country and its people…

 


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David Knoble's curator insight, June 30, 2013 8:10 AM

Great reportage photography with the X-Pro1.

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Traveling to the USA with a Fuji X-Pro 1 | Axel Friberg

Traveling to the USA with a Fuji X-Pro 1 | Axel Friberg | Tourism and Travel | Scoop.it


I am a Swedish photographer based in Uppsala, north of Stockholm. This summer I have been lucky enough to travel for 5 weeks to the US, France and the west coast of Sweden thanks to hospitable friends. I would like to share my pictures with you and your readers. They are all taken with the Fuji X-Pro1 and 35mm f/1.4. I recently read your thoughts on the new Fujifilm X-A1 and your take on the X-trans sensor, or the lack thereof. After shooting with the X-Pro1 for little over a year, I dare say I have some experience with the sensor. And I agree with you! In fact, I dislike the way my OOC files turn out. It is not uncommon that the pictures look kind of smeared. Especially soft objects, like leaves or skin, despite being in perfect focus. However, I have always found it to work well as a monochrome camera. I am huge B&W fan. For a long time, I did some “pixel peeping”, or at least kind of; 100% zoom to check that I nailed focus etc. I’m not a rich guy, and when I put over 2’000 USD last year on the camera and lens, knowingly sacrificing AF-speed for IQ, I was kind of expecting greatness. At first, I felt a tad disappointed. Now, a year later, I have stopped the intense pixel peeping and focus on the final image.......


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Rescooped by Valeria Del Vecchio from Fuji X-Pro1
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A concise city travel guide for photographers | Ming Thein

A concise city travel guide for photographers | Ming Thein | Tourism and Travel | Scoop.it


I’ve been to a lot of places both in the course of my previous life as a wandering professional, as well as more recently as a photographer and occasionally as a tourist. I’ve visited most as a business traveller first, but with a constantly vigilant eye for photographic opportunities. On the whole, some places are more photo-friendly than others; however, every city has its interesting places. What follows is a very brief photography travel guide to some of the more interesting places I’ve been to. It’s organized by city, in alphabetical order. MT


Via Thomas Menk
more...
Dennis Isip's curator insight, April 26, 2013 8:47 PM

I have very little comment, because this author has been to a lot more places than I have. It wouldn't be fair for me to express my opinion about a city that I've never been to. Nevertheless, if I had an immediate plan to visit one of the places he's describing, then I'll definitely take his thoughts into consideration.

Rescooped by Valeria Del Vecchio from Fuji X-Pro1
Scoop.it!

FUJIFILM X100s – The Perfect Travel Camera – 2 Weeks in Japan | Danielle Vitarbo

FUJIFILM X100s – The Perfect Travel Camera – 2 Weeks in Japan | Danielle Vitarbo | Tourism and Travel | Scoop.it

I haven’t been back to Japan in over 7 years so when I was given the opportunity to go again, I didn’t hesitate. It was time to put my X100s to the test and see what it could do in the busy streets of Tokyo. I’m not much of a street photographer, mostly because I’m shy and don’t wanna seem creepy, but if i see a shot, I’m more than willing to suck it up and go for it. All photos were taken with the fujifilm X100s, uploaded onto my Ipad 2, edited on Snapseed, and presented here. There was something really fulfilling about spending the afternoon taking photos with a camera that excites me as much as the fujifilm x100s does, and then spending the evening in a coffee shop uploading and editing the photos. It’s something that really inspired me and I truly enjoyed the entire experience. The Fujifilm x100s is a gorgeous camera. It’s physically beautiful and the results are even better. This camera has the “it” factor. There’s just something about it that just works for a lot of fuji users. The simplicity of it is just right. All the controls are at my fingertips which I absolutely love. This camera makes me want to take photos. Unlike my DSLR which sits on a shelf until its time for a gig, the x100s makes me want to be a better photographer. It inspires me to get out there and shoot some damn photos! It was an absolute joy to use during my two week stay in Japan. Having travelled all across Europe with my DSLR and lenses, this was such a welcomed change in terms of size, weight, and simplicity.....


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