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Rescooped by João Greno Brogueira from sustainable architecture
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A Sustainable High-Rise Greens the Sydney Skyline

A Sustainable High-Rise Greens the Sydney Skyline | Top CAD Experts updates | Scoop.it

While action toward building ‘greener’ more sustainable structures is gaining momentum in Europe and America, an office tower from down-under is putting Australia on the green buildings map.


A 30 story high-rise office tower in Sydney, Australia’s central business district, 1 Bligh Street a treasure trove of sustainable innovation and design.Designed by Architectus and Ingenhoven Architects, this environmentally responsible office tower is set to create a benchmark in Australia for sustainable high-rise buildings and provide an enduring presence on the city skyline.

“The dramatic, naturally-ventilated central atrium connects the office workers with nature at the inner depths of the plan, giving a sense of openness for the entire building. The series of communal spaces throughout the building, and especially the fantastic rooftop garden, add greatly to the quality of life for the tenants.”


Read further and view more images at the article link...



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Norm Miller's curator insight, April 4, 2013 2:32 PM

High rises can be sustainable!

 

Shanghai Metal Corporation's curator insight, November 19, 2014 3:03 AM

We manufacture & supply various building materials. To see more : http://goo.gl/lYC3Qd

Rescooped by João Greno Brogueira from sustainable architecture
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Shakin Stevens House by Matt Gibson Architecture + Design

Shakin Stevens House by Matt Gibson Architecture + Design | Top CAD Experts updates | Scoop.it

Matt Gibson Architecture + Design have designed the Shakin Stevens House in Melbourne, Australia.

‘Shakin Stevens House’ utilises many environmental principles – retention of existing structure, orientation and configuration of new works, sun protection (eaves), exposed thermal mass, passive temperature regulation, low embodied energy construction techniques & materials, structural depth within walls for mass bulk insulation with R values, insulation of entire existing dwelling (floor, walls, ceiling), use of recycled timber flooring/decking. A grey water system, 2 side water storage tanks, fake grass & ‘succulent’ planting temper water usage whilst providing intrinsic features of the colour scheme.

Beyond these, this project is about providing a future robustness, better utilisation of amenity and a more fuller embracing of its urban condition. They have borrowed what was previously laying dormant within and beyond their walls. This new layout provides for a sustainable model of space/s that can sustain user types (a couple, 2 couples, a family with teenagers, guests) through separation of sleeping zones about a flexible living zone that they can upsize (externally). This project embraces it’s ‘green-ness’. Colour was a vital strategy in adding glow and clarity to this expression on a number of levels...


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Levt Keira Taroreh's curator insight, February 18, 2014 10:00 AM

perfect, simply and clean, 2 thumbs up!

archizen's curator insight, December 18, 2017 8:34 AM

Welcome to http://Archizen.org

Rescooped by João Greno Brogueira from sustainable architecture
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Curl Curl Beach House by CplusC Architects

Curl Curl Beach House by CplusC Architects | Top CAD Experts updates | Scoop.it

Located in Sydney’s Northern Beaches, the Curl Curl House exploits the structural and aesthetic benefits of timber with stunning results.

This Northern Beaches residence was an exercise in material, time, and cost efficiency. A specific project brief included two bedrooms with built-in robes, bathroom/laundry, an open plan dining, kitchen, living space, and a deck.

A shared driveway, a services easement, and a compact site influenced the form of the building envelope and allowed the architects to maximise internal floor area without sacrificing external amenity. The building responds to changing climatic conditions through natural ventilation in all directions, two integral fish ponds and vegetation that cool the summer breeze, and large awnings and timber screening to shade living areas whilst providing privacy...


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Rescooped by João Greno Brogueira from sustainable architecture
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Kerr House by Tony Owen Architects

Kerr House by Tony Owen Architects | Top CAD Experts updates | Scoop.it

The design for the Kerr House is structured around a timber spine wall running along the southern boundary, off of which the new home projects outward and opens to the rear with a large cantilevered concrete wing This creates solar protection and also extends the space into the garden, while the remainder of the house is clad in timber battens and glass louvers to maximise natural ventilation.

 

The house was planned according to the principles of passive sustainable design, using natural materials such as timber to create a connection to the surrounding environment. The central atrium and extensive use of glass louvers maximize natural ventilation and large overhangs promote shade to regulate interior temperatures. Expansive upper deck areas maximize spatial flow and integration with the site...

 

VIew more images of this beautiful, contextual home at the link.


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Rescooped by João Greno Brogueira from sustainable architecture
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Maleny House by Bark Design Architects

Maleny House by Bark Design Architects | Top CAD Experts updates | Scoop.it

The ‘Glass House Mountain House’ in Maleny, celebrates its site, perched on the edge of the remnant rim of the Glass House range, as well as the essence of its place – ‘sky and mountains’. Translated into a place of ‘glass and stone’ inextricably connected to its landscape it has qualities of being anchored, robust and earthbound as well as being transparent, light and floating.

Memorable to the experience is the ‘sanctuary’ of the courtyard space, whose edges are defined by ambiguous indoor outdoor thresholds of the transparent internal spaces, sitting between the refuge of a monumental basalt ‘Garden Wall’ and the broader natural volcanic landscape. Engaging with existing topography, orientation, views and vegetation, the house balances economy and fine craft.

It celebrates economical finishes, directness, authenticity, natural, textured and unadorned surfaces which are embroidered with highly crafted timber elements and pieces. Surfaces, finishes and details exhibit the Japanese concept of wabi sabi – the beauty of things imperfect, impermanent and incomplete, allowed to weather and evolve with time...


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