Top Three iPad Apps for Kids with Special Needs | Top Three Apps for Kids with Special Needs | Scoop.it

1. Stories About Me

A child with special needs get more from hearing/reading stories. This is how we made Stories About Me app on the top of our list. From the initial free story a parent or teacher can create, they get first-hand experience on how this app can assist them with their children who have special needs. Create stories using recognizable images like photos of the child or people close to him/her. Recall memorable scenarios that could stir the child’s interest and attention. With a very friendly user interface like swipe and tap, you could let your child do the task by himself. No need to speak as he watch the images changed because the parent or teacher can record his/her voice. Worried that your child might delete or alter the story unintentionally? Don’t be because the app has a parental lock to prevent such incident

 

Download

http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/stories-about-me/id531603747?mt=8

 

 

 

2. Speech with Milo

It’s quite obvious how this app helps parents and teachers with children who have special needs. Speech with Milo became popularly known before to help these children in building their language skills using verbs and prepositions. Now, it came back with another innovation, for only $2.99 to further assist children with special needs—sequencing and storytelling. Remember those sequencing cards we had during the early days. This app has the same concept but in a convenient way using ipad. Using three sequences, a child would just need to drag the images according to which should come first. To see the images in an animated form, parents or teachers can press the play button for the child. Sounds off success are also available as well as a voice reading the sentences.

 

 

3. Grace App

Another most used app, Grace App is non-speaking simple picture exchange app for children with special needs. The child can pick few pictures to create a sentence. How? Pointing on each photo words would be read aloud by the device, practically creating a sentence for the child and relaying the message he wants to convey.