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Apple Maps flaw causes runway alerts

Apple Maps flaw causes runway alerts | Today's Technology | Scoop.it
An Alaskan airport says it has had to place barricades across one of its taxiways after an Apple Maps flaw resulted in iPhone users driving across a runway.
Courtney Gritman's insight:

With a lot of Americans owning an iPhone or some other type of smart phone, they are using the maps off of those. The thing is, most of the apple maps are incorrect or not too accurate. People really shouldn't trust them as much as they do, as there are special things made to tell them where to go, such as Tom Toms or old fashioned paper maps.

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IOS 7 blocks third-party lightning cables

IOS 7 blocks third-party lightning cables | Today's Technology | Scoop.it
Users of Apple devices who use third-party Lightning cables may now be regretting upgrading to iOS 7—such cables may no longer work.
Courtney Gritman's insight:

Some people just didn't like their short chargers that came with their phones, so they purchased Lightning cables (cables that are much longer and can be plugged into the wall). With the iOS 7 update, they are saying that the longer cords are useless and just a waste of money.

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Renewable Energy Technology Resource Maps for the United States

Renewable Energy Technology Resource Maps for the United States | Today's Technology | Scoop.it
These Renewable Energy Technology Resource Maps for the United States are available form the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) as PowerPoint slides: slides are available that show the the...
Courtney Gritman's insight:

This map is basically just showing how much technology usage there is in the United States. The darker the green, the heavier the usage. As you can see, the darker parts are all in the more populated parts of the States.

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zachary nunnikhoven's comment, October 4, 2013 7:35 PM
I think that renewable energy is a really good thing. I knew that iowa produced a lot of renewable energy but i had no idea they produced that much compared to the rest of the U.S.
Jerod Garland's comment, October 16, 2013 2:20 AM
Surprised there isn't more dark green in the Northeast, like Baltimore, Philly, DC. And North Dakota??? Really? Surprising.
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Smart Robots Can Now Work Right Next to Auto Workers

Smart Robots Can Now Work Right Next to Auto Workers | Today's Technology | Scoop.it
It used to be too dangerous to have a person work alongside a robot. But at a South Carolina BMW plant, next-generation robots are changing that.
Courtney Gritman's insight:

Since robots have been placed in jobs to get work done faster and more accurate, this could cause unemployment rates to rise. The main part of having something such as an assembly line is to get work done in little parts at a time and to give people another chance to work. Now that robots have been introduced to work alongside humans, it could be dangerous to both our health by maybe malfuctioning and econamy by taking up work space.

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zachary nunnikhoven's comment, October 5, 2013 1:22 AM
I agree with what you said about it being a risk of workers health to be working along side a robot because all that it would take is one malfunction to seriously hurt some one. But I also think that it would take a way jobs but also make new ones. If companies are going to be needing more robots then the companies making the robots will need to hire more people to keep up with the demands and repairs.
Jerod Garland's comment, October 16, 2013 2:22 AM
Courtney--great response and thoughts! Zach, you also bring up a good point that it could create more jobs, too. Hmm... what if the jobs to make the robots are actually filled with robots, too? Now that's getting freaky.
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Nintendo visionary Yamauchi dies

Nintendo visionary Yamauchi dies | Today's Technology | Scoop.it
Hiroshi Yamauchi, the Japanese businessman credited with transforming Nintendo into a world-leading video games company, dies aged 85.
Courtney Gritman's insight:

Hiroshi invented one of the most popular gaming company that most of our generatin uses everyday. Without him, hopefully the company will still run strong and keep coming out with new gaming devises or just upgrades on the older ones.

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Verizon Coverage Map

Verizon Coverage Map | Today's Technology | Scoop.it
National Airtouch USA wireless cellular coverage map for wireless cell phone service
Courtney Gritman's insight:

Since a majority of the USA's population owns some sort of cell phone, the companies have made it so that there is coverage almost everywhere you go, with the exceptions that there are some places that are uninhabited, such as the Sahara Desert.

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The #More #You #Know: Fallon and Timberlake Make an Anti-Hashtag PSA

The #More #You #Know: Fallon and Timberlake Make an Anti-Hashtag PSA | Today's Technology | Scoop.it
What would hashtags sound like if we spoke them? This, apparently. (#Genius.
Courtney Gritman's insight:

Since Twitter is so popular, most social networks now allow hashtags to be tagged. Using hashtags in normal sentances used to be abnormal, but now is common. Some people are so obsessed, they actually say the word hashtag before they say something.

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A New Touch for iPhone - Walt Mossberg - Personal Technology ...

A New Touch for iPhone - Walt Mossberg - Personal Technology ... | Today's Technology | Scoop.it
Reliable fingerprint technology and a major system overhaul make the iPhone 5s the leader of the smartphone pack.
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Physician adds smartphone to medical tools to gather patient info

Physician adds smartphone to medical tools to gather patient info | Today's Technology | Scoop.it
Beyond consumer-driven apps that count calories or encourage exercise, mobile technology is beginning to significantly change how doctors practice medicine.

 

When Dr. Paul Abramson treats patients, he has the usual assortment of medical tools, tests and protocols. And then there's the patient-gathered data he reserves for his most confounding cases.

 

Using an iPhone app, Abramson will have a patient with, say, mystifying migraines or seemingly inexplicable stomachaches self-track data such as how much sleep they're getting or what they're eating.

 

That information is eventually fed back to Abramson as potential clues to whatever medical mystery he's trying to solve. The result is a more complete picture of his patients that in turn makes it much easier for him to figure out what's going on.

 

"I am getting immeasurably more info about a patient than I could have gotten on my own," Abramson said. "Patients who have been my patients for years I'm finding out are completely different people than I thought they were."

 

"We're at a very interesting intersection of technology impacting clinical care, which hasn't really changed dramatically in 50 or 60 years," said Dr. Michael Blum, director of the Center for Digital Health Innovation at UCSF. "When we look back in 10 years, we're going to be amazed how far we've gone."

 

The ubiquity of smartphones has already had an effect on clinical practice in numerous obvious ways. Doctors can speedily access important information such as drug dosage recommendations or disease profiles as well as a patient's medical information. They can also more easily communicate about patients with specialists or other colleagues.

 

 


Via nrip
Courtney Gritman's insight:

With all the cell phone and app usages we have now, we might as well make the most of it. We make so many apps for games, social networking, and stuff to just spend time on, so why not make it useful and start making some of those apps life saving? It would be nice to not have to pay a huge hospital bill to solve something like the flu.

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Portable, low-cost early-warning test for osteoporosis 

Portable, low-cost early-warning test for osteoporosis  | Today's Technology | Scoop.it

A handheld device for diagnosing the early signs of osteoporosis could be available for clinical use within five years.

 

The technology is currently being refined and tested at the University of Southampton with support from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC). The original concept was invented at the University of California, Santa Barbara.

 

Unlike existing methods of assessing bone fragility, which measure bone density using X-rays, the device is designed to measure the ability of bone tissue to prevent small cracks growing into full-blown fractures.

It does this by pressing a microscopic needle a tiny distance into the top layer of bone. Measured electronically, the amount of penetration indicates how fragile the bone tissue is and therefore the risk of experiencing an osteoporotic fracture later in life.

 

Osteoporosis is often referred to as fragile bone disease. However, for many sufferers, the first indication that they have the condition is when they actually sustain a fracture.

 

Drugs can slow or arrest the development of the disease, but the condition may already be quite advanced by the time the first break has happened. Doctors can estimate an individual's risk of fracturing by using bone-density measurements and other factors such as age, gender, smoking and any history of fracturing. But the new microindentation technology affordably delivers a fundamentally different measurement that has huge potential to refine such an evaluation.

 


Via nrip
Courtney Gritman's insight:

With the new techlogogy we have today, maybe this small and portable device could help save a few lives. With everything being new and improved, it could lead to medically ground breaking news and cures to the uncurable of diseases, such as diabetes or cancer.

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