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The Battle of Shiloh Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org

The Battle of Shiloh Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org | Civil War Scoop | Scoop.it
Our Battle of Shiloh page includes history articles, battle maps, photos, web links, and the latest preservation news for this important 1862 Civil War battle in Tennessee.
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The Battle of Shiloh took place in April 6-8, 1682, near the Shiloh Church in Harden County, Tennessee. General Ulysses S. Grant and many other soldiers moved south and camped in Corinth, Mississippi. As Confederate forces heard this news, they took charge and attacked Grant's army. The Union army made the Confederates leave this battle ground which helped the Union get closer to the control of the Mississippi River. In this battle, more than 23,00 people were injured or killed from both armies. 

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The Battle of Antietam Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org

The Battle of Antietam Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org | Civil War Scoop | Scoop.it
Battle of Antietam page - battle maps, history articles, photos, and preservation news on this important 1862 Civil War battle in Maryland.
Winnie Beaudet's insight:

The Battle of Antietam took place on September 17th, 1862, in Antietam, Maryland. When Confederate soldier Robert E. Lee found out that McClellan was following him and his troops to West Maryland he knew he had to do something. He split his army into four groups. This plan failed. A soldier lost his copy of his orders and a Union soldier found it, bringing it back to McClellan. The Union won this battle, and it is known as then bloodiest battle in the war causing 6,000 deaths and around 17,000 injuries.

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Todd Hillmer's curator insight, March 18, 2015 10:42 AM

The first major battle in the American Civil War to take place on Union soil. It is the bloodiest single-day battle in American history, with a combined tally of dead, wounded, and missing at 22,717.

 
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Page 21 of Clara Barton Papers: Diaries and Journals: 1851, Oct. 11-Nov. 5;1852, Feb. 1-May 27; 1853-1857 | Library of Congress

Page 21 of Clara Barton Papers: Diaries and Journals: 1851, Oct. 11-Nov. 5;1852, Feb. 1-May 27; 1853-1857 | Library of Congress | Civil War Scoop | Scoop.it
Winnie Beaudet's insight:

Later into the Civil war, women began to play bigger roles. Clara Barton was a female nurse who is famous for helping Union soldiers in the battle. Clara Barton founded the American National Red Cross and the National First Aid Association of America. Without Clara Barton and many women like her the health of the soldiers in the war would have been very poor and many more deaths would have occurred. 

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The Gettysburg Address by Abraham Lincoln

The Gettysburg Address by Abraham Lincoln | Civil War Scoop | Scoop.it
abraham lincoln's gettysburg address
Winnie Beaudet's insight:

On November 9th, 1863, after the Battle of Gettysburg, Abraham Lincoln gave a very memorable 272 word, 2 minute speech. This speech was meant to honor all the soldiers who died in this battle and to devote the Soldier's National Cemetery to them. Even though Massachusetts governor Edward Everett delivered a 2 hour long speech right before, Lincoln's speech is one of the most famous and powerful speeches in U.S. history

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American Civil War Music (Confederacy) - Southern Soldier - YouTube

2nd South Carolina String Band -- Southern Soldier ___________________________________________ I'll place my knapsack on my back, My rifle on my shoulder, I'...
Winnie Beaudet's insight:

This song is written for the Confederate army describing what will happen in the war and in their lives. In the first line, the singer says "I'll place my knapsack on my back, my rifle on my shoulder, I'll march away to the firing line and kill that Yankee soldier," which tells us that the soldier that this song is about has joined the army, is confident in his decision and wants to start his job right away. The singer also says, "Who will protect my wife and child and care for my ancient mother?" This line tells the listener that this soldier has to leave his family but still cares for them. He wants to know who will protect his family while he is gone and if he ever dies. This song portrays what the soldiers think during the war.

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The Battle of Totopotomoy Creek Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org

The Battle of Totopotomoy Creek Summary & Facts | Civilwar.org | Civil War Scoop | Scoop.it
The Civil War Trust's Battle of Totopotomoy Creek page contains maps, articles, and photos relating to this important 1864 battle in Virginia.
Winnie Beaudet's insight:

When the Union forces tried to get closer to Richmond after trying to get around Robert E. Lee's army, The Battle of Totopotomoy Creek began. On May 28th, a fight made both armies send weapons and armor to Totopotomoy. Since the Confederates took over part of the creek, this made the Unions have trouble and forced them to find a new path. On May 30th, Lee arranged an attack on the Union. The Confederates took charge, but soon lost power when the Union armies came from Bermuda Hundred and drove the Confederates to leave the Totopotomoy and hurry to the Cold Harbor. 

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Women on the Border: Maryland Perspectives of the Civil War

Women on the Border: Maryland Perspectives of the Civil War | Civil War Scoop | Scoop.it
Winnie Beaudet's insight:

Mary Brooke Briggs was a woman show wrote many diary entries during the civil war. Her diaries are focused on how she attended religious meets, her lifestyle, and her family and friends. Mary was part of a Quaker family who did not own slaves. Because of this, Mary and her family sided with the Union during the Civil war. 

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Life as a Confederate Soldier - Letters of Eli Landers | GACivilWar.org

Life as a Confederate Soldier - Letters of Eli Landers | GACivilWar.org | Civil War Scoop | Scoop.it
Eli Pinson Landers was nineteen years old when he left his home in Gwinnett County, GA to join the Confederate Army in August of 1861.
Winnie Beaudet's insight:

At the age of 19, Eli Pinson Landers was enlisted in the Confederate Army. When people first joined the army, they would imagine it being very fun and adventurous. Eli would write to his mother of all the great times he was having and how he loved serving his country. Deeper and deeper into the war he would write of all his tragedies. He would tell his mother how he hates watching people be murdered and die from disease.  Even through all of his hardships, Pinson told his mother in his last letter how he is a proud server of the Confederate Army.

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Edmund Berkeley Letter, 1863 :: Letters, Diaries, and Manuscripts

Edmund Berkeley Letter, 1863 :: Letters, Diaries, and Manuscripts | Civil War Scoop | Scoop.it
Winnie Beaudet's insight:

Edmund Berkeley was an Union Army soldier during the Civil war. He wrote this letter to his mother complaining about the food he receives, the poor living conditions, but also how he has had no demerits and is doing well in the war. Before this letter was sent, he was informed that his sister has died and he wants to console his mom. This letter shows Berkeleys love for his family and how he misses them deeply. It also shows the message that the war was a very dirty and unhappy place.

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william_moore.pdf

Winnie Beaudet's insight:

This message, written by William Moore, tells how Moore's master treats him and his other slaves. Since Moore can read and write, it shows he is educated, even though there are many mistakes in his writing.  William Moore writes about how he is not given much food and his masters feelings on prayer. Slaves were not citizens in America, so the first amendment of freedom of religion was not granted to them. Slaves were allowed to sing in their cabins and go to church but were never allowed to be seen while doing this. 

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