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UW Press - : The Woman in Battle: The Civil War Narrative of Loreta Janeta Velazquez, Cuban Woman and Confederate Soldier, Loreta Janeta Velazquez: Women Narrative

UW Press - : The Woman in Battle: The Civil War Narrative of Loreta Janeta Velazquez, Cuban Woman and Confederate Soldier, Loreta Janeta Velazquez: Women Narrative | Civil War Scoop It | Scoop.it
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Women in Battle by Jesse Aleman is the story of a woman spy fighting as a man in the Confederacy. Loreta Janeta Velazquez fought as Harry T. Buford in disguise. She fought as a Confederate soldier in the First Battle of Bull Run and the Battle of Shiloh. She later became a Confederate spy! In the North, he worked as a double agent and worked to traffic information, and counterfeit bills to support the Confederate cause. This proves that women aren't just capable of house work. They can fight in war too! Loreta and others who set this example is one of the reasons why women are allowed to fight for our country today.

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Emma Crockett- Enslaved Narrative

Emma Crockett- Enslaved Narrative | Civil War Scoop It | Scoop.it
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Emma Crocket was an 80-year-old slave in the time period of the CIvil War. Emma lived in Livingston, Alabama on Mr. Bob Davis' estate. In this narrative, Emma is telling a young girl about her life, and how she would never get involved in anything that would get her in trouble so she didn't have to suffer consequences. She also said the conditions she lived in were horrible. She was an uneducated slave who could not read or write. Emma told the girl very little things from her past because she is still in pain from being in slavery for so long, from then and to now. She says, "Dat's all I kin tell you today, honey. Come back when dis misery leave my head and I gwine to think up some tales and old songs." Emma says she is much happier than she was before because now she gets enough food and lives with her grandchildren. She still wishes for the end of slavery, but this is much better than where she was at before.

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Life as a Confederate Soldier - Letters of Eli Landers | GACivilWar.org

Life as a Confederate Soldier - Letters of Eli Landers | GACivilWar.org | Civil War Scoop It | Scoop.it
Eli Pinson Landers was nineteen years old when he left his home in Gwinnett County, GA to join the Confederate Army in August of 1861.
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Eli Pinson Landers was a Confederate soldier in the Civil War. Eli left home in the summer of 1861 to join the Confederate army. He wrote letters home to his mother telling of the excitement and adventure of being in war and fighting for the Southern cause. After a while, Eli begins to write letters that are less enthusiastic and more serious. He begins to write about the hard parts of being in war and how he hates watching people get killed and many people dying of disease. Eli finally becomes sick and writes his final letters to his family telling them where he would like to be buried and what words to write on his tombstone, etc., Even when he was dying he still spoke of his love and dedication for the Confederacy. Eli eventually died on October 16th, 1863 of typhoid fever. 

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First Battle of Bull Run Map

First Battle of Bull Run Map | Civil War Scoop It | Scoop.it
Bull Run Public demand pushed Union General-in-Chief Winfield Scott to advance on the South before adequately training his untried troops
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The First Battle of Bull Run was the first major battle of the Civil War. It took place in the summer of 1861. The battle took place in northern Virginia, near a small river called "Bull Run". People from Washington, D.C. watched this battle just a few miles away. It all began when Union General Irvin McDowell attacked a small Confederate troop led my General P.G.T. Beauregard. Even though both sides lacked experience in battle, the Confederates counterattacked the Union soldiers, breaking their lines. The Union fled the battle in panic. The Confederates had gained a victory. This battle was significant because it proved to both sides that this war would not be short, and it certainly would not be easy. This also made Abraham Lincoln sign a total of two bills, requiring a total of 1 million soldiers to fight for the Union. 

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The Story of One Union Soldier - Andersonville Prison

The Story of One Union Soldier - Andersonville Prison | Civil War Scoop It | Scoop.it
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"The Story of One Union Soldier- Andersonville Prison" is a story about a Union soldier named Bernard McKnight who was held in a prison and suffered from many health disadvantages. One day, a violent storm came over the prison and many prisoners, including Bernard, could not move from the street to escape the rising water. Bernard drowned in the water and died at a young age of 27. Bernard's body was buried in a cemetery less than a quarter of a mile away from Andersonville Prison. His grave was numbered 5223. 

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Letting Go, by Phoebe Yates Pember: Doctor Narrative

Letting Go, by Phoebe Yates Pember: Doctor Narrative | Civil War Scoop It | Scoop.it
In this excerpt from her memoir, Pember recounts the final moments of a young Confederate soldier named Fisher, "an especial favorite." Compare Pember's narrative with the deathbed scene described by Louisa May Alcott in "Death of a Soldier."
Rosie Vagnoni's insight:

Letting Go by Phoebe Yates Pember is a narrative basically describing her time and experience in the Civil War. Phoebe served as a nurse and Chief Matron for three years during the Civil War at Chimborazo Hospital in Richmond, Virgina. She tended to wounded soldiers in unsanitary places without the necessary supplies of food and medicine. Specifically in this story, Phoebe recalls the final moments of a young Confederate soldier named Fisher. She describes her struggling to tell the young man that there was no hope for him and that the severed artery would kill him. This would be something Phoebe would remember for the rest of her life. 

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Abraham Lincoln: Gettysburg Address

Abraham Lincoln: Gettysburg Address | Civil War Scoop It | Scoop.it

TThe Gettysburg Address is the most celebrated speech given by President Abraham Lincoln. It followed the Battle of Gettysburg where between 46,000 and 51,000 Confederate and Union soldiers were killed, wounded, captured or missing.

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The Gettysburg Address was a very short speech, about 2 minutes long and contained 272 words, given by Abraham Lincoln. The address was given on November 9th, 1863 in Gettysburg, thus the name. The main point of it was to dedicate the Soldiers' National Cemetery and to honor all the soldiers and their cause. Also, Abraham Lincoln stated his vision for the country. Abraham Lincoln recited this following former governor of Massachusetts Edward Everett's 2-hour-long speech. The Gettysburg impacted the country immensely. The reactions were mixed. Some people thought highly of it, and some people thought poorly of it. The Gettysburg Address remains one of the most powerful speeches in American history.

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Battle of Antietam Map

Battle of Antietam Map | Civil War Scoop It | Scoop.it
This page features an unusual Map of the Battle of Antietam
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The Battle of Antietam was a key victory for the Union. This battle took place on September 17th, 1862 in Antietam, Maryland. Originally, Robert E. Lee (Confederate) planned to move his troops into Western Maryland so he could move into Pennsylvania and bring the war deeper into the Northern states. Lee knew McClellan (Union) was following him so he had to move fast. When Lee got into Maryland, he split his army into four parts so they could each move into different directions. However, his plan didn't work because one of his soldiers lost the copy of the orders describing it. Union soldiers found it and brought them back to McClellan. Since McClellan didn't gather his troops immediately, it gave Lee a chance to recoup and make a makeshift plan. when the battle took place, the Union won. This was the deadliest single day in the war. It totaled at about 6,000 deaths and about 17,000 more suffered wounds.

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Battle of Shiloh Map

Battle of Shiloh Map | Civil War Scoop It | Scoop.it
Battle of Shiloh Map, Civil War Battle of Shiloh Battlefield Maps, Confederate Army at Battle of Shiloh, Union Army, Peach Orchard, Hornet’s Nest Map, Tennessee Maps, Bloody Pond, General Johnston
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The Battle of Shiloh was a key battle in the Civil War. The battle took place in April of 1862 near Shiloh Church. General Grant and 40,000 other soldiers decided to travel south until they reached Corinth, Mississippi and camped there. When the Confederate leaders received word of this, they decided to attack before more troops came to the Union's aid. Early one morning, Generals Albert Sidney Johnston and P.G.T. Beauregard led a surprise attack on the Union soldiers camped out near Shiloh Church. The Union just barely won; however, the casualties between both armies was more than 23,000. After this, the Union forced the Confederate to leave Corinth and invaded Memphis, Tennessee. This battle allowed the Union to get closer to controlling the Mississippi River.

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Maryland, my Maryland - YouTube

Maryland State Song
Rosie Vagnoni's insight:

"Maryland State Song" is a song during the time period of the Civil War. The song was written by James Ryder Randall, who favored the Confederacy. Also, Maryland, a state in the South, was apart of the Confederacy and it bacame the official state song of Maryland. In the lyrics it says, "'Sic semper!' 'tis the proud refrain" Sic semper tyrannis is a Latin phrase that means "thus always to tyrants!" This phrase was said by John Wilkes Booth, (right after he shot Abraham Lincoln in the head) a loyal member of the Confederacy.Also, they were forced to be in the Union.

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