To kill a mockingbird
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Top 10 To Kill A Mockingbird Trivia

Top 10 To Kill A Mockingbird Trivia | To kill a mockingbird | Scoop.it
Join WatchMojo as we celebrate the 50th anniversary of “To Kill a Mockingbird”, cinema's most inspirational film classic by exploring ten pieces of trivia about the film.
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Video Sparknotes: Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird Summary

Check out Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird Video SparkNote: Quick and easy To Kill a Mockingbird synopsis, analysis, and discussion of major characters and...
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Examples of Empathy in To Kill a Mockingbird

Examples of Empathy in To Kill a Mockingbird | To kill a mockingbird | Scoop.it

Empathy is defined as identifying with another person's feelings, or emotionally placing one's self in the place of another. The trait is a theme in Harper Lee's Pulitzer Prize winning novel, "To Kill a Mockingbird...."

 

The overall character of Atticus Finch is an example of how empathy is used in the novel. He displays empathy in his strong beliefs of racial equality, which was uncommon in the 1930s in Alabama.
by Scott Cornell, img http://bit.ly/qCuGfy


Via Edwin Rutsch
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Linda Lee Faber's curator insight, January 16, 2014 9:11 AM

Define in your own words; what  is empathy?  Give an example in your life from a movie, book or TV show you have seen.

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To Kill A Mockingbird- Atticus' Words of Wisdom

This is my 10th grade english project on the novel To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Enjoy!

Via sharon roth
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Overview - To Kill A Mockingbird - Lesson Plan | Teacher Resources - Library of Congress

Overview - To Kill A Mockingbird - Lesson Plan | Teacher Resources - Library of Congress | To kill a mockingbird | Scoop.it

This resource guides students on a journey through the Depression Era in the 1930s.
Also deals with "racism, compassion, and tolerance" in the novel and provides insight into "the history of African Americans in the South."


Via Elizabeth Sky-McIlvain
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Elizabeth Sky-McIlvain's curator insight, December 18, 2012 3:44 PM

Not a place a HS would look for a TKM lesson - you will not find deep literary analysis, but it does include key background materials in different media and activities that require students to think critically about book themes.  Support this with reviews (from the period) and contemporary readings about the place of this book in the literary canon.  And Schmoop.com has some surprisingly good material.  

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To Kill a Mockingbird Introduction Guided KWL Activity

To Kill a Mockingbird Introduction Guided KWL Activity | To kill a mockingbird | Scoop.it
FREE - To Kill a Mockingbird Introduction Guided KWL Anticipatory Activity

This is a great introduction to the novel To Kill a Mockingbird. This activity is fun for the students & gets them interested in the book right away.

Via Tracee Orman
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Tracee Orman's curator insight, January 9, 2013 12:01 AM

Free download for introducing TKaM.

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Immigration laws in the south: a new Jim Crow

Immigration laws in the south: a new Jim Crow | To kill a mockingbird | Scoop.it
Paul Harris: Lawmakers in southern states enacting harsh measures against illegal workers are exempting domestics – a stunning hypocrisy...

 

"...architects of an especially tough new law in Alabama had put in a provision that would exempt "casual domestic labour".

 

I was actually stunned. For the first time in ages. Basically, the good folks in Alabama behind the law were saying that, while companies and factories and farmers and restaurant owners should not dare to employ illegal immigrants (who, according to them, are a threat to the US economy), it was still fine to employ them to wash, cook, clean or look after the kids.

 

That this was taking place in a state where, during segregation, wealthy white people used to regularly employ black maids as household help, just added insult to injury. It truly exposed some of the real social and political motivations behind the illegal immigration debate, especially in the south. As Isabel Rubio, of the Hispanic Interest Coalition of Alabama, said to me: "It's Alabama. It means you can still have your Latina household help."

 

Defenders of the exemption say it was put in because they did not want to trouble homeowners with having to use the E-Verify system to check someone's immigration status every time they hired casual labour. They say the law would still likely apply to people using long-term, or live-in, domestic employees who are illegal. That cuts no ice with me.

 

To my mind, it was simple self-serving hypocrisy. If you don't want brown-skinned illegal immigrants working in Alabama factories and picking Alabama farm crops, then why is it OK for them to – even casually, on a one-off basis – to mow your lawn or wash your clothes or cook your dinner. It was proof that – for a certain sector of the Alabama elite – not so much had changed since the darkest days of Jim Crow."


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