Tissue regeneration
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Facts about Romans for Kids - Roman Britain Homework help

Facts about Romans for Kids - Roman Britain Homework help | Tissue regeneration | Scoop.it
Information, photographs and facts on Roman life in Britain for kids - including Roman food, Roman clothing and a large section on Roman soldiers.

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Cambridge scientists to grow 3D lung - Varsity Online

Cambridge scientists to grow 3D lung - Varsity Online | Tissue regeneration | Scoop.it
Two Cambridge scientists are crowdfunding their way to growing a 3D artificial lung
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Organovo now selling tiny 3D-printed human livers

Organovo now selling tiny 3D-printed human livers | Tissue regeneration | Scoop.it
When a medication enters the bloodstream, it ends up being concentrated in the liver. It would follow, therefore, that if a pharmaceutical company wanted to...

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A "Toolbox" for Tissue Engineering - Biomedical Engineering at RIT

Thomas Gaborski's research may be in ultra-thin nano-membranes, but it's going to be titanic in advancing tissue engineering. Gaborski, assistant professor o...
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How 3-D printing is revolutionizing medicine.

How 3-D printing is revolutionizing medicine. | Tissue regeneration | Scoop.it
A 3-D printer used by researchers at Harvard University’s Wyss Institute creates a model vascular network.

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Could Growing Patient Stem Cells on a Synthetic Scaffold Slash Organ Transplant Waiting Lists? | MIT Technology Review

Could Growing Patient Stem Cells on a Synthetic Scaffold Slash Organ Transplant Waiting Lists?  | MIT Technology Review | Tissue regeneration | Scoop.it

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Jacob Blumenthal's curator insight, January 28, 2014 4:53 PM

This review describes the work of a bioscience spin-off company called Harvard Apparatus Regenerative Technology, or HART in designing and production of polymeric scaffolds for organ replacement.

Come and learn about sem cells:

http://discovery.lifemapsc.com/stem-cell-differentiation

 

Christopher Duntsch's curator insight, February 12, 2014 8:23 PM

This is not a new concept that should be aggressively developed and pursued.  Their are two tracks upon which this concept is traveling. One track is to artificially create in vitro a 3D scaffold for this purpose using current scaffold and matrix technology.  The second is to harvest organs or tissues and modify them in vitro for tissue engineering applications. A tissue is harvested, and biochemical and biophysical methodology are used to completely remove all of the donor tissue's biomaterial, with one exception. The final product is a shell of the former, and consists of the natural scaffold the tissue or organ originally possessed.  It is then used in vitro to build a new organ or tissue,  by seeding it with stem cells and other byproducts  over time, until a new organ or tissue is created for use in humans as part of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine approaches. Immunobiology and immunoreactivity are less of a challenge to overcome here because: the natural scaffold is not immunoreactive, and chemical modifications during preparation of the scaffold are even more protective; most stem cells that might be strategic for this approach demonstrate immunoprivilige or biology that suppresses immunoreactions; and finally, because this approach is one in which a patient's own stem cells would be a good donor source.