Tissue Engineering, cell culture
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The astonishing future of 3D Bioprinting - 3D Bioprinting Conference

The astonishing future of 3D Bioprinting - 3D Bioprinting Conference | Tissue Engineering, cell culture | Scoop.it
Share knowledge, learn from other 3D printing and medical professionals and start networking at world's first international 3D Bioprinting Conference.
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Download the 3D Cell Culture Format Comparison Table - 3D Biomatrix

Download the 3D Cell Culture Format Comparison Table - 3D Biomatrix | Tissue Engineering, cell culture | Scoop.it
Hanging Drops, Hydrogels, ULAs, Scaffolds: How Do the Different 3D Cell Culture Formats Compare? 3D cell cultures represent the body better than traditional 2D cultures. But not every 3D cell culture format is right for every application.
Valérie Cenizo's insight:

Which 3D cell culture format is right for your application?

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Tissue engineering: Hair-like constructs offer drug screening platform - A*STAR Research

Tissue engineering: Hair-like constructs offer drug screening platform - A*STAR Research | Tissue Engineering, cell culture | Scoop.it
A*STAR Research (RT @macscicomm: A*STAR Research Highlight: Tissue engineering: Hair-like constructs offer drug screening platform http://t.co/sybWvvYMHK)...
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Hair regeneration method is first to induce new human hair growth

Hair regeneration method is first to induce new human hair growth | Tissue Engineering, cell culture | Scoop.it
Researchers have devised a hair restoration method that can generate new human hair growth, rather than simply redistribute hair from one part of the scalp to another.
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CHITIN — A promising biomaterial for tissue engineering and stem cell technologies

CHITIN — A promising biomaterial for tissue engineering and stem cell technologies | Tissue Engineering, cell culture | Scoop.it
Chitin could be used as a scaffold for tissue engineering and stem cell technologies | Biotechnology Advances | http://t.co/aJWI47vHRa
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Reportage CELLforCURE JT 20h France 2 - 10 septembre 2013

Reportage CELLforCURE JT 20h France 2 - 10 septembre 2013 | Tissue Engineering, cell culture | Scoop.it
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Cell For Cure company. New facility based near Paris. 

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Making the Switch to 3D Cell Culture | Biocompare: The Buyer's Guide for Life Scientists

Making the Switch to 3D Cell Culture | Biocompare: The Buyer's Guide for Life Scientists | Tissue Engineering, cell culture | Scoop.it
Making the Switch to 3D Cell Culture (Today on Biocompare, Caitlin Smith tells you what you need to know when switching from 2D to 3D cell culture.
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Developing biomaterials for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine | PJ Online

Developing biomaterials for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine | PJ Online | Tissue Engineering, cell culture | Scoop.it
The fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine are growing exponentially through better technology and research.
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Anne Canet's comment, September 9, 2013 4:09 AM
merci
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3D Bioprinting: Moving Beyond 2D Cell Culture by Desktop Engineering

3D Bioprinting: Moving Beyond 2D Cell Culture by Desktop Engineering | Tissue Engineering, cell culture | Scoop.it
Rapid Technologies: This approach to tissue engineering is getting really exciting (unless you’re a robot).
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3D tissue engineering brings researchers closer to viable organ implants

3D tissue engineering brings researchers closer to viable organ implants | Tissue Engineering, cell culture | Scoop.it
Researchers at the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (IBN) have developed a simple method of organizing cells and their microenvironments in hydrogel fibers.
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Scienceness - Challenges and Opportunities for Tissue-Engineering Polarized Epithelium

Scienceness (Scienceness - Challenges and Opportunities for Tissue-Engineering Polarized Epithelium http://t.co/yLCig8GAnL)
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ANN ARBOR STREET ART FAIR: Beautiful images from UM research labs ... - Heritage Newspapers

ANN ARBOR STREET ART FAIR: Beautiful images from UM research labs ... - Heritage Newspapers | Tissue Engineering, cell culture | Scoop.it

ANN ARBOR STREET ART FAIR: Beautiful images from UM research labs ...

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Extraordinary images of the complexity and magic of Life!

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Personalised Medicine Is Almost Here, Says Nobel Prize Winner

Personalised Medicine Is Almost Here, Says Nobel Prize Winner | Tissue Engineering, cell culture | Scoop.it
Personalised medicine is almost here, according to the 2012 winner of the Nobel prize for medicine.
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Generation of 3D Skin Equivalents Fully Reconstituted from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs)

Generation of 3D Skin Equivalents Fully Reconstituted from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells (iPSCs) | Tissue Engineering, cell culture | Scoop.it
PLOS ONE: an inclusive, peer-reviewed, open-access resource from the PUBLIC LIBRARY OF SCIENCE. Reports of well-performed scientific studies from all disciplines freely available to the whole world.
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3D in vitro tissue models and their potential for drug screening

3D in vitro tissue models and their potential for drug screening | Tissue Engineering, cell culture | Scoop.it

Introduction: The development of one standard, simplified in vitro three-dimensional tissue model suitable to biological and pathological investigation and drug-discovery may not yet be feasible, but standardized models for individual tissues or organs are a possibility. Tissue bioengineering, while concerned with finding methods of restoring functionality in disease, is developing technology that can be miniaturized for high throughput screening (HTS) of putative drugs. Through collaboration between biologists, physicists and engineers, cell-based assays are expanding into the realm of tissue analysis. Accordingly, three-dimensional (3D) micro-organoid systems will play an increasing role in drug testing and therapeutics over the next decade. Nevertheless, important hurdles remain before these models are fully developed for HTS.

Areas covered: We highlight advances in the field of tissue bioengineering aimed at enhancing the success of drug candidates through pre-clinical optimization. We discuss models that are most amenable to high throughput screening with emphasis on detection platforms and data modeling.

Expert opinion: Modeling 3D tissues to mimic in-vivo architecture remains a major challenge. As technology advances to provide novel methods of HTS analysis, so do potential pitfalls associated with such models and methods. We remain hopeful that integration of biofabrication with HTS will significantly reduce attrition rates in drug development.


Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.1517/17460441.2013.852181


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Physical cues help mature cells revert into embryonic-like stem cells

Physical cues help mature cells revert into embryonic-like stem cells | Tissue Engineering, cell culture | Scoop.it
Bioengineers have shown that physical cues can help reprogram mature cells back into pluripotent stem cells. The study demonstrates for the first time that biomaterials can help regulate the memory of a cell's identity.

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Jacob Blumenthal's curator insight, October 22, 2013 7:08 AM

In a paper, published in Nature Materials by Downing el al, the researchers demonstrate how surface microtopography enhance reprogramming of mature cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. They found that parallel microgrooves,can replace the effects of small-molecule epigenetic modifiers and significantly improve reprogramming efficiency.

http://www.nature.com/nmat/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nmat3777.html

H. Fai Poon's curator insight, October 23, 2013 10:16 PM

Good read to update you stem cell knowledge.

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Non-invasive measurement of cell viability in 3-dimensional cell culture construct

Non-invasive measurement of cell viability in 3-dimensional cell culture construct | Tissue Engineering, cell culture | Scoop.it

In this work, a non-invasive measurement technique for the quantitative determination of cell viability in a three-dimensional (3D) cell culture construct is proposed. This technique is based on on-site electrical impedance measurement. A microfluidic chip with a 3D culture chamber is fabricated to demonstrate this technique. In vitro 3D cell culture has been interpreted for faithfully representation of the in vivo cellular responses in 3D cell culture construct is normally time-consuming and labor-intensive. In this study, the microfluidic chip consists of a culture chamber, in which a pair of vertical electrodes at its opposite sidewalls was embedded, and a fluidic channel for drug perfusion. Cancer cells encapsulated in agarose gel were loaded into the culture chamber to perform 3D cell culture under the perfusion of culture medium and anti-cancer drug in different concentrations (6, 12, 18, and 24 µg/ml) for 2 days. Since higher drug concentration led to more cell damage or death, the total impedance magnitude of the culture construct was shown to be reasonably proportional to the anti-cancer drug concentration. Moreover, cell proliferation can be also monitored using this technique. The proposed measurement method can determine cell viability without affecting the cellular behaviors during culture. It has a high potential to develop a fast and easy measurement compared with the conventional cellular analysis techniques.

 

 


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Great Lecture from Dr. Robert S. Langer giving an overview of 40 years of research as pioneer!
Biomaterials and Biotechnology: From the Discovery of the First Angiogenesis Inhibitors to the Develop...

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TERMIS-AM Meeting 2013 November 10 - 13

TERMIS-AM Meeting 2013 November 10 - 13 | Tissue Engineering, cell culture | Scoop.it
Congrats Bob Nerem @ibbgatech on Lifetime Achievement Award at 2013 @TermisAm ▸Tissue engineering statesman & pioneer http://t.co/salEvTgyug
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Rescooped by Valérie Cenizo from Cell Therapy & Regenerative Medicine
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Fetal Cells Traffic to Injured Maternal Myocardium and Undergo Cardiac Differentiation

Fetal Cells Traffic to Injured Maternal Myocardium and Undergo Cardiac Differentiation | Tissue Engineering, cell culture | Scoop.it

When a pregnant mouse has a heart attack, her fetus donates some of its stem cells to help rebuild the damaged heart tissue.


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Ella Buzhor's curator insight, September 8, 2013 7:56 AM

Fetal cells selectively home to injured maternal hearts and undergo differentiation into diverse cardiac lineages, including endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and cardiomyocytes.

http://circres.ahajournals.org/content/early/2011/11/11/CIRCRESAHA.111.249037

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Micropatterned Dermal-Epidermal Regeneration Matrices Create Functional Niches that Enhance Epidermal Morphogenesis

Although tissue engineered skin substitutes have demonstrated some clinical success for the treatment of chronic wounds such as diabetic and venous ulcers, persistent graft take and stability remain concerns. Current bilayered skin substitutes lack the characteristic microtopography of the dermal-epidermal junction that gives skin enhanced mechanical stability and creates cellular microniches that differentially promote keratinocyte function to form skin appendages and enhance wound healing. We developed a novel micropatterned dermal-epidermal regeneration matrix (μDERM) which incorporates this complex topography and substantially enhances epidermal morphology. Here, we describe the use of this 3D in vitro culture model to systematically evaluate different topographical geometries, to determine their relationship to keratinocyte function. We identified three distinct keratinocyte functional niches: the proliferative niche (narrow geometries), the basement membrane protein synthesis niche (wide geometries) and the putative keratinocyte stem cell niche (narrow geometries and corners). Specifically, epidermal thickness and keratinocyte proliferation is significantly (p<0.05) increased in 50 and 100μm channels while laminin-332 deposition is significantly (p<0.05) increased in 400μm channels compared to flat controls. Additionally, β1brip63+ keratinocytes, putative keratinocyte stem cells, preferentially cluster in channel geometries (similar to clustering observed in native skin) compared to a random distribution on flats. This study identifies specific target geometries to enhance skin regeneration and graft performance. Furthermore, these results suggest the importance of μDERM microtopography in designing next generation skin substitutes. Finally, we anticipate that 3D organotypic cultures on μDERMS will provide a novel tissue engineered skin substitute for in vitro investigations of skin morphogenesis, wound healing and pathology.

 

 


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Biomimetic electrospun nanofibrous structures for tissue engineering - Review article - Materials Today

Biomimetic electrospun nanofibrous structures for tissue engineering - Review article - Materials Today | Tissue Engineering, cell culture | Scoop.it
Bingyun Li and co-workers look at the design, fabrication, and utilization of scaffolds based on electrospun nanofibers.
Valérie Cenizo's insight:

Nice!

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Reinnervate's Alvetex Scaffold system chosen for 3D osteocytic cell culture experiments in microgravity

Market leading 3D cell culture company Reinnervate Ltd today announced that its Alvetex®Scaffold system has been chosen by a group at Massachusetts General Hospital for the first ever 3D osteocytic cell culture experiments in microgravity.
Valérie Cenizo's insight:

Wow, I'm looking forward to see the results!

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Epithelial cancer cells exhibit different electrical properties when cultured in 2D and 3D environments

Epithelial cancer cells exhibit different electrical properties when cultured in 2D and 3D environments | Tissue Engineering, cell culture | Scoop.it

Background

Many drug development and toxicology studies are performed using cells grown in monolayers in well-plates and flasks, despite the fact that these are widely held to be different to cells found in the native environment. 3D, tissue engineered, organotypical tissue culture systems have been developed to be more representative of the native tissue environment than standard monolayer cultures. Whilst the biochemical differences between cells grown in 2D and 3D culture have been explored, the changes on the electrophysiological properties of the cells have not.

Methods

We compared the electrophysiological properties of primary normal oral keratinocytes (nOK) and cancerous abnormal oral keratinocytes (aOK), cultured in standard monolayer and reconstituted 3D organotypical tissue cultures. The electrophysiological properties of populations of the cells were analysed using dielectrophoresis. The intracellular conductivity of aOK was significantly increased when grown in organotypical cultures compared to counterpart cells grown in monolayer cultures.

Results

3D cultured aOK showed almost identical intracellular conductivity to nOK also grown in organotypical cultures, but significantly different to aOK grown in monolayers. The effective membrane capacitance of aOK grown in 3D was found to be significantly higher than nOK, but there was no significant difference between the electrophysiological properties of nOK grown in 2D and 3D cultures.

General significance

This work suggests that factors such as cell shape and cytoplasmic trafficking between cells play an important role in their electrophysiology, and highlights the need to use in vitro models more representative of native tissue when studying cell electrophysiological properties.


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Regulating tension in three-dimensional culture environments

The processes of development, repair, and remodeling of virtually all tissues and organs, are dependent upon mechanical signals including external loading, cell-generated tension, and tissue stiffness. Over the past few decades, much has been learned about mechanotransduction pathways in specialized two-dimensional culture systems; however, it has also become clear that cells behave very differently in two- and three-dimensional environments. Three-dimensional in vitro models bring the ability to simulate the in vivo matrix environment and the complexity of cell-matrix interactions together. In this review, we describe the role of tension in regulating cell behavior in three-dimensional collagen and fibrin matrices with a focus on the effective use of global boundary conditions to modulate the tension generated by populations of cells acting in concert. The ability to control and measure the tension in these 3D culture systems has the potential to increase our understanding of mechanobiology and facilitate development of new ways to treat diseased tissues and to direct cell fate in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering applications.
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