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Rescooped by Dr. Helen Teague from Business Brainpower with the Human Touch
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Why You Should Start Some Goals In The Middle

Why You Should Start Some Goals In The Middle | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

Traditional goal setting focuses on the beginning and the end—start strong and keep your eye on the prize. Unfortunately, that process doesn’t work for every kind of goal, says Scott Young, author of How to Change a Habit.

 

“A lot has been taught around the classic self-help style of Zig Ziglar or Tony Robbins where you have a clear goal, you visualize it, write it down, and focus on the starting point,” says Young, cofounder of the career development course Top Performer. “Some goals, though, aren’t clearly sequential.”

 

The middle can and should be your starting point when you’re setting a goal where you’re unclear of the level you can achieve within a particular timeframe. This is especially the case with daunting, unfamiliar goals where you don’t yet have a strong sense of the big picture.


Via The Learning Factor
Dr. Helen Teague's insight:
From the original scoop: "Traditional goal setting focuses on the beginning and the end—start strong and keep your eye on the prize. Unfortunately, that process doesn’t work for every kind of goal, says Scott Young, author of How to Change a Habit. “A lot has been taught around the classic self-help style of Zig Ziglar or Tony Robbins where you have a clear goal, you visualize it, write it down, and focus on the starting point,” says Young, cofounder of the career development course Top Performer. “Some goals, though, aren’t clearly sequential.” The middle can and should be your starting point when you’re setting a goal where you’re unclear of the level you can achieve within a particular timeframe. This is especially the case with daunting, unfamiliar goals where you don’t yet have a strong sense of the big picture."
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, March 6, 4:28 PM

Some goals aren’t clearly sequential. Here’s the case for rethinking your approach.

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Unleashing the Introverted Leader

The reality is that introversion has little to do with our levels of social  comfort or verbosity. Rather, it reflects on our energy source. Extroverts are people who gain their energy from others. They walk into a room and feel energized, feeding off of the collective energy as they navigate through the crowd. They seek other’s company and feel somehow incomplete if they are left in isolation for too long.

Introverts, in contrast, gain their energy from quiet, private time. They love to think and reflect privately, with the door closed, and enter into public settings out of necessity rather than preference. While many introverts can be described as quiet, introverts are more than capable of speaking and engaging as circumstances dictate. It’s more about their preferences and inclinations rather than their disposition or capacity.

Dr. Helen Teague's insight:

Introverts, in contrast, gain their energy from quiet, private time. They love to think and reflect privately, with the door closed, and enter into public settings out of necessity rather than preference. While many introverts can be described as quiet, introverts are more than capable of speaking and engaging as circumstances dictate. It’s more about their preferences and inclinations rather than their disposition or capacity.

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Rescooped by Dr. Helen Teague from iGeneration - 21st Century Education (Pedagogy & Digital Innovation)
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Are You An Analog or Digital Leader?

Are You An Analog or Digital Leader? | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
By Abhijit Bhaduri and Bill Fischer Changing mindsets begins with you! The only mind you can be sure of changing is your own, and the only way that you can demonstrate this mindset change is through your behaviors. If you aspire for your organization to be faster, more innovative, less afraid [...]

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Sonia Santoveña's curator insight, March 23, 2015 5:09 AM

añada su visión ...

Willem Kuypers's curator insight, March 29, 2015 3:28 PM

Le digital a certainement changé notre façon d'être. Ici l'auteur fait une extrapolation vers le leadership du 21st siècle. Évidemment les choses ne sont pas aussi noir/blanc. Il faut des styles de management différents selon les situations.

Sarah johnstone's curator insight, May 19, 2015 4:59 AM

Digital - DIGItal - DIGITAL All The Way For Me!! ��

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Why Asking for Help Makes You a Stronger Leader

Why Asking for Help Makes You a Stronger Leader | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
"We’re all imperfect and we all have needs. The weak usually do not ask for help, so they stay weak. If we recognize that we are imperfect, we will ask for help and we will pray for the guidance necessary to bring positive results to whatever we are doing." — John WoodenAsking for help wasn’t something that my parents ingrained in me. Well, that’s how I interpreted their guidance anyway. When they told me repeatedly to be confident, strong, and independent, I assumed that the opposite traits would be a bad thing.For so many of us, the idea of asking for help
Dr. Helen Teague's insight:

Includes 5 accurate assumptions why people often find it difficult to ask for and receive support

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5 Best Questions For Leaders To Build Resilience Against Blind Spots

5 Best Questions For Leaders To Build Resilience Against Blind Spots | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
By Madeleine Van Hecke 1. “Did my mind just slam shut to an idea?” If my mind feels closed, can I at least leave it ajar? 2. “Did I just think ‘I’m absolutely sure of that!’?” The more certain I am, the more I need to question my certainty.
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Lessons From Social Psychology To Apply In The Workplace

Lessons From Social Psychology To Apply In The Workplace | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

Running a successful organization requires lots of moving pieces running smoothly in tandem. At the heart of every organization are people just like you and me, whose performance can be influenced in a positive direction. Recently, companies like Google and Facebook have been redefining the standards of workplace culture, and in turn seeing improvements in employee satisfaction and company performance. Now, your company might not be large enough to have a dedicated HR (or “People Ops”) department, but there are some exciting takeaways from social psychology that you can apply to benefit your business.

 

Reciprocity Principle

Reciprocity is one of the famous “Six Principles of Persuasion” defined in Robert B. Cialdini, Ph.D.'s book, Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion. The idea is that we feel pressure to repay others for what they have given us or done for us. We often even give back more than we were initially given to minimize any guilt associated with the initial favor.

 

Founders and CEOs can use this to their advantage. Internally, this can help improve or repair work relationships, win over co-workers and build consensus. As Dr. Cialdini writes, reciprocity is so powerful that it can overcome feelings of suspicion or dislike toward the person who gives the gift or favor. As a small business owner, how about giving gifts or bonuses on holidays or birthdays? You could also offer to bring back coffee for the office or surprise your colleagues with breakfast or lunch. A kind gesture can go a long way.

 

Outside the office, the reciprocity principle can help you succeed in negotiations, build valuable business partnerships and win over investors — or even customers! When we launched our product and were at our first trade show full of retail managers and buyers, we realized that people only stopped at our booth if we handed them a free sample. So we handed samples to everyone who walked by! In turn, they stopped, listened to our pitch, and 99% of the time they placed an order for their store. In those first few hours, we sold over 100 cases into 100 new stores.


Via The Learning Factor
Dr. Helen Teague's insight:
From original scoop: "Running a successful organization requires lots of moving pieces running smoothly in tandem. At the heart of every organization are people just like you and me, whose performance can be influenced in a positive direction. Recently, companies like Google and Facebook have been redefining the standards of workplace culture, and in turn seeing improvements in employee satisfaction and company performance. Now, your company might not be large enough to have a dedicated HR (or “People Ops”) department, but there are some exciting takeaways from social psychology that you can apply to benefit your business. Reciprocity Principle Reciprocity is one of the famous “Six Principles of Persuasion” defined in Robert B. Cialdini, Ph.D.'s book, Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion. The idea is that we feel pressure to repay others for what they have given us or done for us. We often even give back more than we were initially given to minimize any guilt associated with the initial favor. Founders and CEOs can use this to their advantage. Internally, this can help improve or repair work relationships, win over co-workers and build consensus. As Dr. Cialdini writes, reciprocity is so powerful that it can overcome feelings of suspicion or dislike toward the person who gives the gift or favor. As a small business owner, how about giving gifts or bonuses on holidays or birthdays? You could also offer to bring back coffee for the office or surprise your colleagues with breakfast or lunch. A kind gesture can go a long way. Outside the office, the reciprocity principle can help you succeed in negotiations, build valuable business partnerships and win over investors — or even customers! When we launched our product and were at our first trade show full of retail managers and buyers, we realized that people only stopped at our booth if we handed them a free sample. So we handed samples to everyone who walked by! In turn, they stopped, listened to our pitch, and 99% of the time they placed an order for their store. In those first few hours, we sold over 100 cases into 100 new stores."
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The Learning Factor's curator insight, March 6, 4:18 PM

Using the tools of social psychology can encourage personal and organizational success.

To Let's curator insight, March 7, 6:46 AM

nice content - we at tolet digital agency  apply your concept.

sometime the ideal work to list and associate with property owners across the globe can be quite something. visit our website today and list your properties form any location across the globe as we keep lessons from social psychology at our work place.

CCM Consultancy's curator insight, March 11, 12:34 AM

Reciprocity is one of the famous “Six Principles of Persuasion” defined in Robert B. Cialdini, Ph.D.'s book, Influence: The Psychology of Persuasion. The idea is that we feel pressure to repay others for what they have given us or done for us. We often even give back more than we were initially given to minimize any guilt associated with the initial favor.

Rescooped by Dr. Helen Teague from Communication & Leadership
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The Naked Truth: How to Uncover an Insecure Leader

Our insecurities can kill our confidence and competence. Learn how to recognize them within yourself, so you can eliminate them.

Via Amy Ragsdale
Dr. Helen Teague's insight:
I have not seen much treatment of this subject...
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donhornsby's curator insight, September 14, 2016 10:00 AM
We all have tendencies toward insecurity from time to time. But making sure you don't give in to damaging behavior born of insecurity will make you a far better leader, boss, and person.
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4 Stories Great Leaders Tell To Engage Their People

4 Stories Great Leaders Tell To Engage Their People | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it
German novelist and playwright Gustav Freytag wanted to understand how storytelling impacted the human psyche. He wondered, “What makes a story so engaging that it changes a person’s behavior?” After studying William Shakespeare’s work, Freytag designed a map of storytelling—a key that explained why the man considered ‘the greatest writer [...]

Via Anne Leong
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Roy Sheneman, PhD's curator insight, January 26, 2015 12:47 PM

The best leaders are definitely story-tellers?

Matthew Farmer's curator insight, January 27, 2015 1:53 AM

Powerful stories are told with conviction and the most powerful are often told on the basis of personal experience. 


Learning to articulate your powerful personal learning experiences as stories will not only help you to reflect on your learning and therefore make it more powerful, but also help you share your learning with others and influence them to take action.  Leadership indeed!

James Hutchison's curator insight, January 28, 2015 11:01 AM

Of course you reach people by telling stories - it's how we make sense out of life - you can give the theory but you have to provide real world examples and that's why we have stories. Stories help us understand life. But if you tell a story to teach a moral I would suggest that unless you live by that story's moral lesson it doesn't matter how many stories you tell - nobody will believe you. Telling a good story is one thing but having integrity is another.

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10 Timeless Leadership Lessons to Help Expand Your Influence

10 Timeless Leadership Lessons to Help Expand Your Influence | Thinking, Learning, and Laughing | Scoop.it

Via Daniel Watson
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Progressive training's curator insight, May 9, 2014 9:21 AM

10 Timeless Leadership Lessons to Help Expand Your Influence

 

#leadership #management #business

donhornsby's curator insight, May 22, 2014 9:14 AM

Leaders must take more time to stop, reflect and assess their own thinking, capabilities and aptitudes. 

 

 

(From the article): As leaders, you must begin to look beyond the obvious and open your eyes to see the opportunities previous unseen.   Leadership requires you to have circular vision and when you begin to grow complacent, you only see the obvious details before you – rather than those they lie around, beneath and beyond what you seek.  In fact, your mindset becomes stagnate because you are not stretching your perspectives enough to see more than you want to.

 

When you fall into this trap, it’s time to reshuffle the deck, and map out the internal and external factors that are influencing your thinking. You must begin to identify areas that can be improved –  such as relationships, workshop culture, networking, how you are investing in yourself (or lack thereof), etc.

 

It’s not experience, but rather opportunity that is the true mother of success.   Be more mindful about how you manage opportunity before it begins to manage you.

Ivon Prefontaine, PhD's curator insight, May 22, 2014 10:41 AM

The first lesson is a good place to begin. We become so busy we do not look up and from side-to-side. Leaders need to be present and aware of what is happening and not happening. They need to be aware of who is best served to take the reins in a given situation.

 

In School, leadership and management should be intertwined. Quite often, I found that the latter was used almost exclusively and leadership did not exist.