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Teach mental health, schools urged

Teach mental health, schools urged | thinking globally | Scoop.it
Mental health lessons should be on the timetable in every secondary school, a new charity says.
Madison Bassow's insight:

I think this is an interesting article in contrast to the cursive article I scooped a few weeks ago. As we move forward, new barriers appear and I think we have failed to take responsibility to reorganize our educational priorities in relation to those barriers. I believe that mental health is a topic that is becoming more and more okay to talk about, which is a positive thing because it is a relevant issue that needs to be addressed but typically hasn't been in the past. I think that adding it into education is such a great idea; teaching young people to recognize trends and symptoms in themselves and others could and would save so many lives. I would love to look back on these British schools in a few years and see some statistics (i.e. grades, suicide rates, etc..).

 

 

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How to Write About Female Politicians Without Being a Sexist Shithead

How to Write About Female Politicians Without Being a Sexist Shithead | thinking globally | Scoop.it
Over the weekend, New York Times public editor Margaret Sullivan took the paper to task for its characterization of Wendy Davis on a recent Times magazine front cover. In case you missed it, the cover featured a close-up of Davis's face with the captions: "CAN WENDY DAVIS HAVE IT ALL?" and "A Texas-Size Tale of Ambition, Motherhood, and Political Mythmaking." It came on the heels of their bizarro Hillary Clinton cover just a few weeks before, which portrayed the former First Lady as a leering, fleshy Death Star dominating politics with her "gravitational pull."
Madison Bassow's insight:

I chose this article because while I do love basically every point the author makes, I thought this was a great article to look at word choice. The title alone is a great example. The author is clearly angry based on the title, and you really get a feel for her passion as you read on. I personally think that every word was intentional and was well thought out. Although we view swearing as careless and vulgar, the author uses it to drive home a few different points in her article. One of her points is to not call women in politics dainty or petite, or to point out the fact that a politician is a woman. I think that she is swearing to show that women aren't always dainty and polite. Also, she repeats the shoes/appearance point a few times and I think that repeating it wasn't enough for her, she added the cursing to really get the reader's attention and prove to them it wasn't something they could just skip over. 

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The troubling gender gap in retirement savings - The Week Magazine

The troubling gender gap in retirement savings - The Week Magazine | thinking globally | Scoop.it
The Week Magazine
The troubling gender gap in retirement savings
The Week Magazine
By 1990, the gender pay ratio had inched up to 70 percent. (Yes, it took over three decades to make "progress.") Today, that figure is closing in on 80 percent.
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**Read later

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We should all be feminists: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie at TEDxEuston

http://www.tedxeuston.com Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie a renowned Nigerian novelist was born in Nigeria in 1977. She grew up in the university town of Nsukka, En...
Madison Bassow's insight:

"The problem with gender is it perscribes how we should be, rather than recognizing how we are." 

 

This is a 30 minute video of a Nigerian author talking about the gender problem of Nigeria, and the world as a whole. Her main point was the gender does make men and women experience the world differently, but the culture created by people has made it so the experience gap is unnatural. She talked about the idea that women are supposed to know how to be domestic and cook, but when we think of famous chefs they are mostly men. She also brought up how silly it is that we don't teach boys to cook because why would we deprive them of the skill to nourish themselves? Another point she made was about how 100 years ago it made sense for men to rule the workforce because the workforce was based on strength and in general, men are inherently stronger than women. However, now, job opportunities are not based on strength, they are based on innovation and creativity, which has nothing to do with hormones.

 

 

It is a long video but it didn't feel like 30 minutes. She is a very talented and refreshing public speaker, and talked about feminism in a non-theatening way. 

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Here's The New SAT Test Essay Question

Here's The New SAT Test Essay Question | thinking globally | Scoop.it
AUSTIN, Texas -- The venerable SAT college admissions test will look very different in spring 2016. And, according to the new test's architect, there will be "no more mysteries."

The essay will be optional, and will be based on a source ...
Madison Bassow's insight:

I am assuming a lot of people are scooping this article for class because it is relatable, and I could take a negative stance, saying that I was frustrated because if I were just a few years younger I wouldn't have had the short end of the stick. Personally I could care less that my SAT days are behind me. I took the test, got a score and I still don't really know what that score means but hey, I am in college and that was the point, right? College Board changing the SAT is important because it isn't about making it easier for students, it's about allocating resources equally. I feel like the college board has a really difficult job, the public education system has so much inequality and college board has to make it so that it's fair to assess all students from all different schools and backgrounds while also creating an assessment that shows how ready they are for higher education. Finding a fair balance can't be easy to do especially when things come out about how the test is racially biased, etc. The part that I related to the most was about the fee waivers. I personally got a fee waiver when I took the SAT but I only got 1 fee waiver per year so if I wanted to take it a second time, I would have to pay. Studies have proven that taking the test more then once increases the student's score. Allowing 4 fee waivers gives students who otherwise wouldn't have the chance to take the test the opportunity to better their scores. Again, it isn't about making the test easier, it's about making the test more fair. 

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NEWSFLASH: Facebook Offers Gender Options and Neutrality

NEWSFLASH: Facebook Offers Gender Options and Neutrality | thinking globally | Scoop.it
Facebook released 50 new gender choices for users last week. Users can now express their gender from male or female to pan-sexual, androgynous, trans*, gender-fluid, etc. On Facebook's Diversity page, the social network ...
Madison Bassow's insight:

I feel like social media/technology is kind of the theme of my generation, and older generations view it as non-traditional (some would also say progressive, but whatever). The idea of gender fluidity is another "nontraditional" idea, but one that is clearly being advocated and acknowledged by some pretty big companies. I think this is important because this is proof that young people can and do stand up for they want and what they think is important. I also think that Facebook is struggling with its users and this could be Facebook  making a business move and trying to appeal to younger users. 

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Cursive writing bill's fate still in doubt

Cursive writing bill's fate still in doubt | thinking globally | Scoop.it
Will Sen. Jean Leising’s cursive writing bill get a hearing in the Indiana House on the third try? That’s still […]
Madison Bassow's insight:

While this is a short article, I think that it is addressing a very important topic. As our world is changing rapidly around us, should our curriculum change too? I agree with the bill, we should require all students to learn how to read and write in cursive. I believe that as our world progresses new things should be added to curriculum, especially when it comes to computers and technology. It is astounding to me that computer literacy classes are not required all over. I personally think we should teach more than the basics in public education when it comes to computers, because the world is moving past computer literacy and that becomes more evident to me everyday I get closer to joining the workforce. However, I don't think we should denounce curriculum either. I believe that school's #1 priority should be to provide the world well rounded, educated individuals. To me, removing cursive from curriculum sounds as odd as removing knowing how to graph equations or learning what year WW2 started. I believe that cursive is important because it teaches structure, it helps students be able to read cursive, and I don't want to look back in 50 years and think about how cursive is a lost art (more than it already is now). Cursive shouldn't be a special talent, it should be a required skill. 

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