Thinking Critically, an integral digital literacy
46 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Tom Irons
Scoop.it!

News Literacy: Critical-Thinking Skills for the 21st Century

News Literacy: Critical-Thinking Skills for the 21st Century | Thinking Critically, an integral digital literacy | Scoop.it
Guest blogger Peter Adams of the News Literacy Project suggests three methods for teaching critical thinking skills and smart media consumption habits to a generation growing up in a climate of information overload.
Tom Irons's insight:

Rank 2# - Highly ranked as it demonstrates the need for a reshaping of education curriculum to better prepare students for success in the digital workplace.

 

 

An article again addressing the glaring whole in todays primary and secondary education systems, of there being a lack of informing students on effect digital literacies so that they can learn and develop from the information available to them. The article points out the discrepancy between todays generation's ability to use technology i.e navigate their way through a smart phone etc, versus their relative inability to navigate the digital world. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tom Irons
Scoop.it!

Digital Literacy and Critical Thinking Skills: Separating Fact from Opinion

Digital Literacy and Critical Thinking Skills: Separating Fact from Opinion | Thinking Critically, an integral digital literacy | Scoop.it
In the early days of using the internet as a research tool, to my shock and horror, I noticed that my Comp and Lit college students were doing something much worse than handing in pre-written and heavily circulated essays. What could be worse than purchasing or borrowing, a.k.a., cheating? Cutting and pasting random quotes from the internet into a Word program, heavily plagiarized as they were not attributed to sources, and not promoting a single, original thought. At least with a recycled paper, there would be a few stray thoughts from the "new" author. I sat down to a slew of these papers, hobbled together with no transitions, no structure or developed thesis. I googled some phrases from student papers and soon found the sources, and poor sources at that. I knew that my next lesson would be: what is plagiarism; what the school’s consequences for it is; and critical thinking skills about sources and, of course, defining a thesis. What bothered me most, [...]
Tom Irons's insight:

Rank - 11#

 

A blog post from and Mew York writing and editing professional, Laura Pizzirusso, who demonstrates how uneducated some of her students are at critically assessing the information they read on the internet and determining weather it is fact or fiction. She recalls students stating online opinions as facts. Blog post is intended to stress the importance of teaching students critical thinking as an integral digital literacy.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tom Irons
Scoop.it!

Critical Thinking Skills for the Digital Age

Critical Thinking Skills for the Digital Age | Thinking Critically, an integral digital literacy | Scoop.it
By Frank B. Withrow Until about five thousand years ago mankind was limited to communication skills in the form of the spoken word and cave drawings. With the invention of writing the word could be...
Tom Irons's insight:

Rank - 10#

 

An insight into the role of educators in the new digital world. The article talks about how literacy before the 20th century was limited to that of educated priests, scholars and scribes who were the 'gatekeepers of information' and were relied upon to ensure all information written was accurate and reliable. Yet now in the digital age educators must teach the youth the become their own personal 'gatekeeper' of information and employ them with the skills to determine fact from fiction in the realm of the world wide web

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tom Irons
Scoop.it!

Teaching Critical Thinking in Age of Digital Credulity | DMLcentral

Teaching Critical Thinking in Age of Digital Credulity | DMLcentral | Thinking Critically, an integral digital literacy | Scoop.it
By the end of 2014, more than 3 billion people will have access to the Internet, which means that they (we) have the power to ask any question at any time and get a multitude of answers within a second.
Tom Irons's insight:

Rank 9#

 

An article that stresses the importance of teaching critical thinking to to todays youth so they can accurately and effectively sift through the plethora of useless information available on the web, allowing it to be an informative, accurate and positive learning and knowledge base.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tom Irons
Scoop.it!

Spot the fake! Counterfeit shoes & goods revealed

How much material difference is there really between a Nike shoe and a knock-off? CHOICE looks at fake and counterfeit goods.Read more at: http://www.choice....
Tom Irons's insight:

Rank #20 - Eye opening video on how counterfeit  shoes can look so similar to real ones. Just an example of what can happen if someone is to no thinking critically about what they are purchasing over the web.

 

A short video demonstrating the remarkable similarity between both fake Nike Free Runs and replica versions, with only subtle differences. The most obvious discrepancy is the price. That is something that should raise alarm bells for a consumer and urge them to thinking critically about their purchase. Ask question such as; How can this company possibly afford to retails Nike shoes as such a discounted rate? Do they come with a warranty? Is there a link to the original Nike site anywhere on their webpage?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tom Irons
Scoop.it!

Work from home scam? The questions you need to ask - Michigan State University Extension

Work from home scam? The questions you need to ask - Michigan State University Extension | Thinking Critically, an integral digital literacy | Scoop.it
Michigan State University Extension
Work from home scam?
Tom Irons's insight:

Rank 17# - Provides a necessary questions to ask when fronted with what may be a potential work from home scam.

 

 

 

An article posted earlier this month by Michigan State University educator Vivian Washington, addressing one of the most prevalent type of scam seen today.

People are often enticed by the sheer connivence of working from home and earning lots of money. They are blinded by the prospect of this freedom and often believe fake testimonials that are set up to con them into buying into a scam. Washington gives a step by step process one should undertake before committing to any working from home program that should ensure you are not signing up for a scam. It is critical thinking like this that must be instilled in all internet users

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tom Irons
Scoop.it!

SCC Library: Evaluating Websites

SCC Library: Evaluating Websites | Thinking Critically, an integral digital literacy | Scoop.it
This video introduces students to the concept of website evaluation, emphasizing its importance and showing basic evaluation techniques. Video produced by th...
Tom Irons's insight:

Rank 5# - Demonstrates how to assess the credibility and validity of websites. Provides details step by step process.

 

 

 

A Video put together by Katherine Stiwinter, a public services librarian of the University of North Carolina. Again addressing common checkpoints when assessing the credibility of a website. Suggests .gov and .edu domains are most reliable, urges you to ask questions like; Who is the author? What are their Qualifications? Who sponsors the website? What does the company or organisation stand for? Are the sources of the information available? When was it published?

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tom Irons
Scoop.it!

Credible Websites?

Learn about evaluating websites. (Hartness Library CCV/Vermont Tech)
Tom Irons's insight:

Rank 7# - Raises much of the same points as #5, and #6 yet is a more simplified shorter verison

 

 

A simple checklist on how to determine the credibility of a website. Include things such who is behind the website? i.e a company with and agenda? Is it and educational (.edu) or governmental (.gov) website that is more reliable. Is the author of the information provided? Who is he/she? Are they Knowledgeable on the topic? No author = Reg Flag.

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Tom Irons from Online Authenticity and Credibility
Scoop.it!

Credibility and Digital Media @ UCSB

Credibiilty and Digital Media @ UCSB: seeking to understand how people find and use online information that they believe to be credible.

Via James Bavin
Tom Irons's insight:

A site put together by two University of California, Santa Barbra professors, Dr Miriam Metzger and Dr Andrew Flanagin, about the importance of understanding credibility in Digital Media.

They stress the importance of determining credibility in the information one digests online and how inaccurately assessing the credibility of a source can impact someone; socially, personally, mentally, rationally and financially.

more...
James Bavin's curator insight, August 21, 2014 6:59 PM

A little bit about Digital Media and the stakes of credibility.

 

Rank #10 - So why do we need to study credibility? If you have already forgotten then you should read this to blow over and confusion. This was the first page I read when making this list and it was a good introduction into the 'why' of credibility study.

Scooped by Tom Irons
Scoop.it!

Crap Detection 101

The all-important literacy of determining the credibility of information found on the Internet. A companion to my blog post of the same title. (Voice-over in...
Tom Irons's insight:

Rank 1# - An in depth discussion on the importance of instilling internal 'crap detectors' in people engaging in the digital world. Highly informative and from an extremely knowledgable person. Rheingold has studied digital media and its literacies for the past 30 years.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tom Irons
Scoop.it!

B.C.'s Digital Literacy Standards

Ministry of education, eboard
Tom Irons's insight:

Rank - 13#

 

 

British Columbia's identified digital literascy characterstics that must be instilled in student for them to become successful in the 21st century. The second characteristic state is "critical thinking, problem solving and decision making," this again demonstrates how important the skills of critical thinking and analysing fact vs fiction is in the digital world 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tom Irons
Scoop.it!

Learning to Think Critically: Girls and Digital Literacy Skills

Learning to Think Critically: Girls and Digital Literacy Skills | Thinking Critically, an integral digital literacy | Scoop.it
WISENET (Women in ICTs Shared Excellence Network) is the International Bureau’s convening platform that aims to leverage the experience, resources and connections of the international ICT community to better the situation of women, their communities and their countries.
Tom Irons's insight:

Rank 12#

 

Outlines how current education systems teach students to memorise and regurgitate informations rather than being taught critical thinking, problem solving and effective ways to communicate ideas, all far more transferable skills in the business world.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tom Irons
Scoop.it!

Creating critical thinkers through media literacy: Andrea Quijada at TEDxABQED - YouTube

Quijada is the executive director of Media Literacy Project. With more than a decade of experience as a media literacy trainer, and 20 years as a community o...
Tom Irons's insight:

Rank 3# - Comes from Andrea Quijada  who is a media literacy trainer with more than 20 years experience, thus highly knowledgeable on media literacies such as critical thinking.

 

 

A video that suggests empowering youth with the ability to deconstruct media and think critically about the motives behind ads, newspaper articles, online blogs and other media, is one of the most important tool for them to learn. It relates the ability to deconstruct and analyse media with questions such as; Who is this aimed at?, What is the untold message behind this media? as the equivalent of having a super power.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tom Irons
Scoop.it!

Evaluating Sources on the World Wide Web

This film provides information concerning 21st century skills and how to evaluate internet web sites for validity, authorship, timeliness, and integrity.
Tom Irons's insight:

Rank 4#

 

Video providing method and steps for evaluating sources on the web. Video says the responsibility lies with the consumer of information to effectively deliberate what is credible and useful information and what is not.  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tom Irons
Scoop.it!

Twitter vs. Facebook as a news source: Ferguson shows the downsides of an algorithmic filter

Twitter vs. Facebook as a news source: Ferguson shows the downsides of an algorithmic filter | Thinking Critically, an integral digital literacy | Scoop.it
Twitter’s brevity and the nature of the relationship that users have with each other will likely always make it better suited for breaking news, but Facebook also loses out as a news source because of the way it uses ranking algorithms to filter...
Tom Irons's insight:

Rank 15#

 

An interesting article comparing both Facebook and Twitter as news sources. The movement away from traditional media as a medium for breaking news first means that society is now more reliant on social media as its first point of contact when a story breaks. With that comes the responsibility for that news to be credible and reliable, which is a scary thought given both platforms facilitate freedom of speech for all users. Facebook is less credible as the site uses algorithms to filter peoples news feeds given who they are friends with and what they have 'liked'. This demonstrates the need for people to develop their own level of skepticism as an initial reaction to news they read on social media. Society must develop and automated response such as; Ok, who is telling me this? Why are they knowledgeable on the topic? Is anyone else reporting similar stories? Is there factual backing?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Tom Irons
Scoop.it!

Review of MartinLutherKing.org.

A Think Outloud review of MartinLutherKing.org.
Tom Irons's insight:

Rank 19# - An example of how things cannot be what they seem on the internet and users must take a sceptical stance to what they see and first as it will press them to ask the necessary questions to uncover the truth. Ranks low because it is just an example and not a demonstration of how to think critically.

 

 

 

 

A highly important demonstration of how even .org sites that are put together by not for profit organisations and are more often than not a credible source of information, can also be misleading. Martinlutherking.org poses as a site that documents the life of the historical American Civil Rights activist, yet when looking deeper the site provides inaccurate and bias information and is actually published by a White Supremacy group know as 'White Pride World Wide'. A great example how important thinking critically about information you are reading online and where it is coming from is imperative.

 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Tom Irons from Digital Literacy Sites
Scoop.it!

Connect!: CSS Podcasts: Assessing Website Credibility

Connect!: CSS Podcasts: Assessing Website Credibility | Thinking Critically, an integral digital literacy | Scoop.it

Via Carol Hawkes
Tom Irons's insight:

Rank 14#

 

A Fairly basic video that shows a 3 step process for assessing the credibility of a website. By critically analysing the Reliability of Authorship, the documentation of sources, and overall appearance of a website one can further gauge whether the information on that website is useful unbiased information that can help them or whether there is a hidden agenda behind what is being said.

more...
Carol Hawkes's curator insight, May 7, 2013 2:43 PM

Lesson from Calgary Science school on assessing website credibility.  Complete with video, rubric, worksheet and exemplars.  Completed in conjunction with the Critical Thinking Consortium.

Rescooped by Tom Irons from Online Authenticity and Credibility
Scoop.it!

How to Test the Validity or Authenticity of a Website

How to Test the Validity or Authenticity of a Website | Thinking Critically, an integral digital literacy | Scoop.it
When you perform business online, you run the risk of coming across fake websites that may steal your money, harm your computer and even steal your identity. Testing a website against some safety ...

Via James Bavin
Tom Irons's insight:

Rank 6# - Similar to #5, a checklist for how to assess the credibility of a website


Notes a way in which you can determine the authenticity of a website. Outlines how scammers often just slightly misspell URL's that can often go unnoticed. A must read for people shopping online

more...
James Bavin's curator insight, August 21, 2014 2:28 AM

Short. Sharp. Effective

 

Rank #9 - There isn't too much more information this websites shows off that the others on here don't but I really like one point this site makes that the others don't mention as much, and that is what they have to say about URL's and more to the point, incorrectly spelt URL's. A much needed read.

Rescooped by Tom Irons from Online Authenticity and Credibility
Scoop.it!

Social Media as a Credible News Source

Social Media as a Credible News Source | Thinking Critically, an integral digital literacy | Scoop.it

Is social media a credible news source? Is it better to keep up to date with the latest trends even if they haven't been confirmed?


Via James Bavin
Tom Irons's insight:

Rank 8#

 

 

 

An interesting article on how nowadays social media is often the first medium at which word is spread or news breaks. Is this a good thing? Can we rely on, as it is put in the article, "citizen journalism" to give us real time updates on the worlds happenings?

The article suggest that social media should play a role in tandem with traditional media outlets to report the news. The problem is so often people see something on social media and immediately believe its true, without thinking critically and looking up things like;

who reported the news? Are they a credible source given the nature of the news being reported?

more...
James Bavin's curator insight, August 21, 2014 7:03 PM

"Twitter breaks news. TV covers it. #NewParadigm"

 

Rank #17 - When you see on Facebook/Twitter that a big event has unfolded do you then mark it as true and then keep scrolling? I hope not. Hopefully you then Google the topic to find out more. This link is in my list because it will teach you that not everything you see on social media is necessarily the way the event unfolded. People have different opinions and it is perspective in these opinions that can change a story. This also goes into the good aspects of social media as a news source because there are quite a few and their story needs to be told.