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The evolution of morality – Allen Buchanan and Russell Powell – Aeon

The evolution of morality – Allen Buchanan and Russell Powell – Aeon | Thinking Critic | Scoop.it
Our morality may be a product of natural selection, but that doesn’t mean it's set in stone

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For centuries now, conservative thinkers have argued that significant social reform is impossible, because human nature is inherently limited. The argument goes something like this: sure, it would be great to change the world, but it will never work, because people are too flawed, lacking the ability to see beyond their own interests and those of the groups to which they belong. They have permanent cognitive, motivational and emotional deficits that make any deliberate, systematic attempt to improve human society futile at best. Efforts to bring about social or moral progress are naive about the natural limits of the human animal and tend to have unintended consequences. They are likely to make things worse rather than better.

It’s tempting to nod along at this, and think humans are irredeemable, or at best, permanently flawed. But it’s not clear that such a view stands up to empirical scrutiny. For the conservative argument to prevail, it is not enough that humans exhibit tendencies toward selfishness, group-mindedness, partiality toward kin and kith, apathy toward strangers, and the like. It must also be the case that these tendencies are unalterable, either due to the inherent constraints of human psychology or to our inability to figure out how to modify these constraints without causing greater harms. The trouble is, these assumptions about human nature are largely based on anecdote or selective and controversial readings of history. A more thorough look at the historical record suggests they are due for revision.

 


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Teaching philosophy to children? It's a great idea

Teaching philosophy to children? It's a great idea | Thinking Critic | Scoop.it
Michelle Sowey: Studying philosophy cultivates doubt without helplessness, and confidence without hubris. I’ve watched children evolve to be more rational and open-minded because of it

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The Intersection of Neuroscience and Philosophy (Video)

Is there a science of the soul? Does how we think about the brain define how we think about ourselves?

 

Patricia Churchland, B. Phil., LLD (hon), Professor Emeritus, Department of Philosophy at UC San Diego, joins William Mobley, MD, PhD for a deeper look at the connections between neuroscience and philosophy.

 

Source : uctv.tv


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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, February 14, 2014 8:28 AM

Há muitas interseções!

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What Is the Common Good?

What Is the Common Good? | Thinking Critic | Scoop.it

This article is adapted from a Dewey Lecture by Noam Chomsky at Columbia University in New York on Dec. 6, 2013.

 

Source : truth-out.org


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What you think is right may actually be wrong – inferring vs reason

What you think is right may actually be wrong – inferring vs reason | Thinking Critic | Scoop.it
We like to think that we reach conclusions by reviewing facts, weighing evidence and analyzing arguments. But this is not how humans usually operate, particularly when decisions are important or ne...
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Jeff Schmidt's 'Disciplined Minds' reviewed by Brian Martin

Why aren’t there more radical teachers? Is it just the difficulty of being radical in a system built around compulsion, discipline, conformity, and reproduction of the class structure? Or is part of the problem the way that people become teachers? Indeed, why is it that so many educational radicals were never formally trained as teachers?


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The Tragedy of Common-Sense Morality: Our Intuition Is Not Good.

The Tragedy of Common-Sense Morality: Our Intuition Is Not Good. | Thinking Critic | Scoop.it
Our instincts don't always serve us well. Moral psychologist Joshua Greene explains why, in the modern world, we need to figure out when to put our sense of right and wrong in manual mode.

 

Tiffany O’Callaghan: You say morality is more than it evolved to be. What do you mean?
Joshua Greene: Morality is essentially a suite of psychological mechanisms that enable us to cooperate. But, biologically at least, we only evolved to cooperate in a tribal way. Individuals who were more moral—more cooperative with those around them—could outcompete others who were not. However, we have the capacity to take a step back from this and ask what a more global morality would look like. Why are the lives of people on the other side of the world worth any less than those in my immediate community? Going through that reasoning process can allow our moral thinking to do something it never evolved to.


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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, December 20, 2013 8:25 PM

It's fact! 

Dorothy R. Cook 's curator insight, September 25, 2017 6:05 PM

Just because it doesn't serve us well doesn't mean its wrong though.

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Why Knowing Keeps Us Dumb

Why Knowing Keeps Us Dumb | Thinking Critic | Scoop.it
If we keep doing only what we know how to do, we'll never grow.

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Pedro Tavares's curator insight, January 6, 2014 5:23 AM

Não podemos resolver nossos problemas usando o mesmo modelo de conhecimento paradigmático que os criaram. 

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Six Famous Thought Experiments, Animated in 60 Seconds Each ~ by Maria Popova ~

Six Famous Thought Experiments, Animated in 60 Seconds Each ~ by Maria Popova ~ | Thinking Critic | Scoop.it
From Ancient Greece to quantum mechanics, or what a Chinese room and a cat have to do with infinity.

From the fine folks at the Open University comes 60-Second Adventures in Thought, a fascinating and delightfully animated series exploring six famous thought experiments.

 

 


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Creating a curriculum for critical thinking - Florida Flambeau

Creating a curriculum for critical thinking - Florida Flambeau | Thinking Critic | Scoop.it
Creating a curriculum for critical thinking
Florida Flambeau
Employers are no longer looking just at a candidate's major, but their critical thinking skills.
Andres Marquez's insight:

I LOVE it

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