Thinking, Awareness and Learning
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Thinking, Awareness and Learning
Thinking as a tool for learning
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The Future of Facebook: Mining the Human Cloud - Forbes

The Future of Facebook: Mining the Human Cloud - Forbes | Thinking, Awareness and Learning | Scoop.it
The results show that you are worth about $81 to Facebook. Your friendships are worth $0.62 each, and your profile page could be valued at $1,800. The value of a business page is worth approximately $3.1 million.”

 

Essentially Laney describes the value of you and Facebook’s nearly one billion users as being part of the largest unpaid workforce in history

 

Unlike Google, Facebook knows more about you than you know about yourself. They not only understand the way you communicate, but have a clear view of your entire social graph over an extended period of your life, possibly for some born today, your entire life. They have been able to cater to a variety of social profiles from the lurker to the information aggregator / influencer to everything and everyone in between. They have mapped the continually evolving DNA of modern society.

 

Its 845 million users, each with an average of 130 friends, equates to 109 billion friendships. Facebook’s S-1 corroborates this figure as “over 100 billion friend connections.”

 

Using this raw data they can effectively predict trends and more importantly capitalize on these trends with the greatest of ease. Imagine applying the type of social data to stock market trends or seasonal buying habits, or a multitude of other market trends to predict potential outcomes.

 

The bigger question yet to be answered is whether Facebook will be the Enron of the information age – a one time high flyer who burns out its own weight, built upon an over-hyped cloud. Or will it grow to become the General Electric of our digital lives – a refiner of the most important of data into usable and actionable information. I suppose only time will tell. I’m leaning toward the latter.

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Mind over Magic? Conjuring Reveals How Our Neural Circuits Can Be Hacked: Scientific American

Mind over Magic? Conjuring Reveals How Our Neural Circuits Can Be Hacked: Scientific American | Thinking, Awareness and Learning | Scoop.it
Humans have a hardwired process of attention and awareness that is hackable.


When people focus on one thing, their brains automatically suppress everything that happens around it. ­Magicians have devised many techniques that exploit this “tunnel vision.”
People can pay attention in various ways. Magicians exploit “top-down,” or deliberate, attention by, say, asking a person to scan a book. They capture “bottom-up” attention with distracting displays such as doves fluttering out of a hat.

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We Are The Filter Bubble

We Are The Filter Bubble | Thinking, Awareness and Learning | Scoop.it

Các thuật toán đang vô thức tạo ra filter bubble cho chúng ta, nhưng chúng ta cũng đồng thời tạo ra nó thông qua việc follow những người trên mạng

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Why Education Startups Do Not Succeed

Why Education Startups Do Not Succeed | Thinking, Awareness and Learning | Scoop.it
 I co-founded PrepMe in 2001. We were one of the first education companies online and the first purely online, personalized platform. We were acquired in 2011 by Providence Equity-backed Ascend L...
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This Is Generation Flux: Meet The Pioneers Of The New (And Chaotic) Frontier Of Business | Fast Company

This Is Generation Flux: Meet The Pioneers Of The New (And Chaotic) Frontier Of Business | Fast Company | Thinking, Awareness and Learning | Scoop.it

The future of business is pure chaos. 

 

"Uncertainty is when you've defined the variable but don't know its value. Like when you roll a die and you don't know if it will be a 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, or 6. But ambiguity is when you're not even sure what the variables are. You don't know how many dice are even being rolled or how many sides they have or which dice actually count for anything."

 

You don't know what you don't know

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In search of the money gene

In search of the money gene | Thinking, Awareness and Learning | Scoop.it
What makes someone want to start a business? That was what the young economist Philipp Koellinger was trying to figure out in 2008. His survey data showed that entrepreneurs thought differently from other people—that they believed in themselves more, feared failure less, and tended to see opportunities where others saw threats

 

Somewhere down that rabbit hole, people’s financial behavior could be traced to their DNA.

 

They say economists are missing something important by ignoring the genetics underlying things like risk-taking, patience, and generosity. If we could grasp how our genes influenced such economic traits, they argue, the knowledge could be transformative.

 

“I very firmly believe that information about your genetic makeup is probably the most private thing you could possibly have, and there should be extremely tight protections to make sure that no one gets their hands on this data unless you as an individual explicitly want this.”

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Cuckoo - What is time?

Cuckoo - What is time? | Thinking, Awareness and Learning | Scoop.it
In his accidental break from astronomy, De Mairan provided the first published evidence that organisms possess internal clocks. He also launched an entirely new field—chronobiology, the study of those clocks and of how the cyclical processes of living beings relate to the cyclical processes of the cosmos.

 

Internal Time made me think deeply about what it means to be a time-bound organism: about the ways we live in time and the ways time lives in us. It is, in an unusually literal sense, a book about what makes us tick.

 

The first regime is internal time: the schedule established by our bodies. The second is sun time: the schedule established by light and darkness. These two we share with houseplants and virtually every other living being. But we are also governed by a third regime: social time. That sounds benign enough, like afternoon tea with a friend. But don’t be fooled. Social time is the villain in this drama, out to turn you against health, happiness, nature, sanity, even your own inner self.

 

Single-cell creatures that lack even nuclei nonetheless have internal clocks; so do human beings with programmable cappuccino-makers. In plants, the clock can be located in leaves, stems, or roots. In slugs, it’s at the base of the eye. In many birds, it’s in the pineal gland, the structure near the center of the brain where Descartes thought future scientists would find the soul. In mammals, the clock is located near the base of the brain, in a group of nerve cells known as the suprachiasmatic nucleus, or SCN. The SCN consists of only about 20,000 of the brain’s estimated 100 billion neurons;

 

Time zones were invented partly to simplify railroad schedules, but these days we associate them most with air travel—specifically, with jet lag, that highest manifestation of our increasingly unnatural relationship to time. Jet lag feels terrible, Roenneberg says, not just because you’re out of sync with the world but because you’re out of sync with yourself: New research suggests internal organs adjust to time changes at different rates. In effect, while your conscious mind is in Paris, MapQuesting its way toward salted-caramel ice cream on the Île Saint Louis, your SCN is in New York, and your liver is somewhere over the mid-Atlantic.

 

“What is time?” Augustine asked in his Confessions. Beats him: “If no one asks me, I know. If I wish to explain it to one that asketh, I know not.” Fifteen hundred years later, we remain similarly befuddled. We think about time constantly: when our alarm goes off in the morning, when we glance at our wristwatch mid-run, when we watch our children grow shockingly tall.

 

And we live uneasily in time in another way, too. Time is what all creatures measure, but humans are the creatures who measure time. That is a remarkable but not a comfortable ability. If human culture is delightful but disrupts our sleep, the same could be said of human consciousness. It’s wonderful, thank heavens for it—and yet we are the only species kept awake at night by the thought that time is passing, that its quantity, for us, is finite. This is the fundamental pathos of being, in effect, a conscious Swatch. Our internal clocks do what we cannot: keep time.

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Amazon.com: The Filter Bubble: What the Internet Is Hiding from You (9781594203008): Eli Pariser: Books

The Filter Bubble: What the Internet Is Hiding from You

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Saying Stuff is Dead is Dead

In this deck I answer four dead questions: What is the problem of saying stuff is dead? Why do people say stuff is dead? Why do we believe stuff is dead?
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Future Work Skills 2020

Future Work Skills 2020 | Thinking, Awareness and Learning | Scoop.it

Sense-making: ability to determine the deeper meaning or significance of what is being expressed


Social intelligence: ability to connect to others in a deep and direct way, to sense and stimulate reactions and desired interactions


Novel and adaptive thinking: proficiency at thinking and coming up with solutions and responses beyond that which is rote or rule-based


Cross-cultural competency: ability to operate in different cultural settings


Computational thinking: ability to translate vast amounts of data into abstract concepts and to understand data-based reasoning


New media literacy: ability to critically assess and develop content that uses new media forms, and to leverage these media for persuasive communication


Transdisciplinarity: literacy in and ability to understand concepts across multiple disciplines


Design mindset: ability to represent and develop tasks and work processes for desired outcomes


Cognitive load management: ability to discriminate and filter information for importance, and to understand how to maximize cognitive functioning using a variety of tools and techniques


Virtual collaboration: ability to work productively, drive engagement, and demonstrate presence as a member of a virtual team

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