Thinking about reading and writing
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Philosopher Judith Butler on the Value of the Humanities and Why We Read

Philosopher Judith Butler on the Value of the Humanities and Why We Read | Thinking about reading and writing | Scoop.it
"We lose ourselves in what we read, only to return to ourselves, transformed and part of a more expansive world."
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Anne Lamott on Writing and Why Perfectionism Kills Creativity

Anne Lamott on Writing and Why Perfectionism Kills Creativity | Thinking about reading and writing | Scoop.it
"Perfectionism is the voice of the oppressor, the enemy of the people. It will keep you cramped and insane your whole life."

Anne Lamott'
Kim Vose's insight:

Anne Lamott is always wonderful. Her down to earth, realistic advice resonates with almost every writer I know. But, this story is also useful for the links to other words of wisdom from writers.

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Active Reading Strategies and Tips from Dartmouth College

Kim Vose's insight:

This page is full of tips and links to help improve your reading skills and comprehension.

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Paige durand's curator insight, February 20, 2014 12:20 PM

This website is set up almost like a table of contents for things that a college student may need help with to make themselves understand what they may be doing wrong or even right but need to elaborate for. This website is consisted of links to articles and videos to help enhance a individuals reading and writing experience.

Christopher Chao's curator insight, March 20, 2014 2:26 PM

These myths seems true though to some extent because I don't think I could comprehend something as well as them because I need to if I were to read it faster than the usual pace I normally read at. I also think that reading every word would be myth but they would help too. I wish people would also stop generalizing for others how somethings are effective and how somethings are not.

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Letters of Note: Make your soul grow

Letters of Note: Make your soul grow | Thinking about reading and writing | Scoop.it
Fascinating letters. Interesting correspondence.
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Todd Bratcher's curator insight, February 2, 2014 11:55 PM

Great and touching advice by Kurt Vannegut. It makes me happy when well known authors take time out of their busy schedules to reply to the  massive amount of mail they recieve and give advice to those who ask. Vannegut inspires these kids to think outside the box and to not be afraid of inventiveness and creativity. Sometimes we all should go on our impulses and do things just to do them regardless of how silly or immature it may be. Be creative, be artistic, make your soul grow.

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Grammar rules vs. conventions

Why is it that students never seem to learn the basic rules of grammar and punctuation, even though they take classes like English 104 and spend years in middle and high school learning about them?...
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Paige durand's curator insight, February 13, 2014 11:57 AM

This article shows that over time people are getting lazier with their writings and punctuation is beginning to decline.  With the lack of practice of writing throughout the years people are becoming more incompetent when using grammar and punctuation since they don't have the practice. Even though since we were younger we have been taught how to write  quantity to impress the teacher rather and quality.

Lexi Chase's curator insight, February 13, 2014 8:38 PM

I think this article and made a lot of sense. Today as students the only time we are asked to actually write proper material is for school. We have adapted to texting and e-mails, which very seldom use proper grammar and we always have spell check to help us out. I think proper writing was much more prominent in generations past. It does not mean that it is no longer a useful skill. Many careers, most careers use proper formats of writing on a daily basis. It shows the basics that you are well educated in the way you present yourself in writing. "lol" and "hv" and "u" are not going to impress others. I like the idea of having students write journal articles for an audience rather than a paper to be turned into a teacher. I know that would be something I would be much more proud and enthusiastic about than an essay I turned in. 

Madison Bassow's curator insight, March 6, 2014 7:07 AM

When the author was giving the 4 reasons why she believes that basic skills are being retaught when a student enters college, I just kept nodding my head. I can think of specific examples where each of these reasons/situations have occurred in my academic career so far. In my senior year of high school my English teacher asked us to keep track of our different writing assignments in all of our other classes. Out of my 5 other classes I had 2 writing assignments over the entire year, which is so odd to me because even in english we write about different subjects like science and history, but in those courses we were never asked to or taught how to write about them. But that brings up her fourth point, what do we consider a writing assignment? I personally see anything more than a paragraph as a writing assignment. But if you wanna get technical, almost every assignment is a writing assignment, no matter the length. 

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Teaching Student Annotation: Constructing Meaning Through Connections - ReadWriteThink

Teaching Student Annotation: Constructing Meaning Through Connections - ReadWriteThink | Thinking about reading and writing | Scoop.it
Students examine text closely and create annotations to make personal and meaningful connections with the work.
Kim Vose's insight:

This is a short essay on teaching students how to annotate. Its intended audience is English teachers, but in explaning how to teach annotation, I think it does a better job of teaching annotation than many texts aimed at students do. 

 

This article was originally publsihed by the National Council of Teachers of English, a well respected academic publisher.

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Cris Heredia's curator insight, September 12, 2013 2:08 AM

I feel annotating is one of the most helpful ways of taking short--to the point--notes. In my opinion, it's the simplist form of note taking around. This article was published by, ReadWriteThink.Org

Sharena Hamilton's curator insight, April 3, 2014 2:24 PM

I believe this is a good article that help students learn how to annotate, annotating reading is very helps to understand the material ones is reading 

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How Texas Teaches History - The New York Times

How Texas Teaches History - The New York Times | Thinking about reading and writing | Scoop.it
Grammar matters, especially when textbooks tackle the subject of slavery.
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That 'Useless' Liberal Arts Degree Has Become Tech's Hottest Ticket

That 'Useless' Liberal Arts Degree Has Become Tech's Hottest Ticket | Thinking about reading and writing | Scoop.it
Stop thinking of Silicon Valley as an engineer's paradise. There's far more work for liberal arts majors -- who know how to sell and humanize.
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Ink on Paper: Some Notes on Note-taking

Ink on Paper: Some Notes on Note-taking | Thinking about reading and writing | Scoop.it
Two Princeton University psychological scientists wondered if laptops, despite their plusses, might lead to a shallower kind of cognitive processing, and to lower quality learning. They decided to test the old and the new in a head-to-head contest.
Kim Vose's insight:

This study suggests what many of us thought we knew already: that there's something about the physical act of writing that leads to increased learning and comprehension.

 

The interesting thing about this study - to me - is that it makes me wonder if taking notes with a pen and paper while reading is also more beneficial than taking notes on a laptop, especially considering how many professors use e-texts these days, particularly on the CI campus. I also wonder if annotation software, the kind that lets one make handwritten notes on a .pdf has the same learning beenfits as taking notes with a pen and paper.

 

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Kassandra Aguilar's curator insight, February 20, 2014 3:02 PM

When I came across this article I decided to choose this for my scoop-it page because I found it interesting that even though they that drinking this water could be harmful they still tell the residents that it is okay for them to use it. Also it caught my attention because back at my high school they would say that the water in the town was contaminated so I was able to relate to it a bit. This website is a reliable source because they are always posting any type of news that happen around the world and try to make sure that what they are saying is true.

Mayra Cecilia Ramos's curator insight, March 20, 2014 12:44 PM

The study that is being done does make you think which is more beneficial, what works better and what doesn't. I know as for myself, I work better on hands on experience having the paper in front of me instead of just looking at it online because like that I can add side notes. It is important for us college students to know how we work and learn the best so that we can be successful in our academics. 

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Annoying Ways People Use Sources | Writing Spaces

Annoying Ways People Use Sources | Writing Spaces | Thinking about reading and writing | Scoop.it
Kim Vose's insight:

This chapter from Volume 2 of Writing Spaces is a good primer on how to, and how not to, use sources in your writing.

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Carly Armstrong's curator insight, February 20, 2014 3:31 PM

It's a very good research source on how to use your sources and what are bad ways of using those sources.  This should definitely be read if you are having trouble with how to use your resources.  And if you are using them wrong it will straighten you out.

Sidney Williams-Goddess's curator insight, March 19, 2014 6:19 PM

Helpful chapter from, writingspaces.org, on incorporating sources into your essays. Discusses the rights and wrongs of sourcing.

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My Evolving Perspective on Grammar, Punctuation, and Other Conventions of Language

My Evolving Perspective on Grammar, Punctuation, and Other Conventions of Language | Thinking about reading and writing | Scoop.it
I must admit that I did enjoy reading Eats, Shoots & Leaves.  I must admit that, for many years, I fostered my tendency to spot and inwardly sigh (and, at times, snarl) at misplaced apostrophes...
Kim Vose's insight:

MacMillan's short post helps outline the beauty of an ever-evolving language.

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Lexi Chase's curator insight, March 7, 2014 3:02 AM

This was an intriguing topic to read about and I don't think it's talked about much at all. Most people get very "uptight" about correct grammar usage. I think worrying about grammar and punctuation etc. in casual settings is not really necessary. Maybe this comes from when we learned these conventional rules all through school and our grade went down if they were not used properly? The question proposed here is are we worrying too much about proper grammar and not enough about the content? As long as you can clearly understand what is being said that's all that matters, right?  However, as I can understand and agree with that perspective I think having proper grammar use to show your intelligence is a great skill. When in more professional situations such as work or business letters, e-mails, etc. you want to be able to portray your sophistication when you are not in person.