thescienceofmushrooms
27 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Ruby Leigh
Scoop.it!

'India will take at least 40 years to eliminate leprosy' - Firstpost

'India will take at least 40 years to eliminate leprosy' - Firstpost | thescienceofmushrooms | Scoop.it
New Delhi, July 28 (IANS) India's leprosy elimination programme has not been "successful" and it will take at least 40 years to completely eliminate the disease from the country, an international expert has said. In 2005, WHO had declared that India had eliminated leprosy. However, India reported an average increase of five to seven percent in the detection of new cases annually over the last five years, with an increased proportion of cases seen among children - Firstpost
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ruby Leigh
Scoop.it!

WHO Model Prescribing Information: Drugs Used in Leprosy: Treatment of leprosy

WHO Model Prescribing Information: Drugs Used in Leprosy: Treatment of leprosy | thescienceofmushrooms | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ruby Leigh from Virology News
Scoop.it!

Can the Curse of Leprosy Finally Be Lifted? - Slate Magazine

Can the Curse of Leprosy Finally Be Lifted? - Slate Magazine | thescienceofmushrooms | Scoop.it
Slate Magazine
Can the Curse of Leprosy Finally Be Lifted?

Via Ed Rybicki
more...
Ed Rybicki's curator insight, February 22, 2013 6:28 AM

Good news for a leprosy vaccine.

Rescooped by Ruby Leigh from Trending in Uganda
Scoop.it!

Leprosy still a big threat in Uganda, official says

Leprosy still a big threat in Uganda, official says | thescienceofmushrooms | Scoop.it
More than 400 people are diagnosed with leprosy in Uganda every year despite the availability of drugs and treatment centres.

Via Ugtrendz
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ruby Leigh
Scoop.it!

Mycobacterium leprae - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Mycobacterium leprae

Mycobacterium leprae , also known as Hansen's coccus spirilly, mostly found in warm tropical countries, is a gram-positive bacterium that causes leprosy (Hansen's disease). It is an intracellular, pleomorphic, acid-fast bacterium. M. leprae is an aerobic bacillus (rod-shaped) surrounded by the characteristic waxy coating unique to mycobacteria.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ruby Leigh
Scoop.it!

Leprosy Symptoms, Causes, Treatment - What is the treatment for leprosy? - OnHealth

Leprosy Symptoms, Causes, Treatment - What is the treatment for leprosy? - OnHealth | thescienceofmushrooms | Scoop.it
Learn about leprosy (Hansen's disease), a disfiguring disease caused by the Mycobacterium leprae bacteria. Read about symptoms and signs (skin lesions), history, transmission, treatment, and medications.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ruby Leigh
Scoop.it!

Leprosy (Hansen’s disease) - symptoms, treatment and prevention :: SA Health

Leprosy (Hansen’s disease) - symptoms, treatment and prevention :: SA Health | thescienceofmushrooms | Scoop.it
Leprosy or Hansen’s disease is a rare bacterial infection of the skin and nerves caused by Mycobacterium leprae and can be successfully treated
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ruby Leigh
Scoop.it!

Leprosy - Better Health Channel

Leprosy is a chronic bacterial infection that affects parts of the body and the nervous system, particularly the peripheral nerves. Leprosy is characterised by skin lesions. Leprosy is also known as Hansen's disease, Hanseniasis or HD. The disease is common in tropical and subtropical regions but is curable with multi-drug therapy.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ruby Leigh
Scoop.it!

Leprosy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Leprosy - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Leprosy is curable with treatment. Treatment for paucibacillary leprosy is with the medications dapsone and rifampicin for 6 months. Treatment for multibacillary leprosy consists of rifampicin, dapsone, and clofazimine for 12 months. These treatments are provided for free by the World Health Organization. A number of other antibiotics may also be used.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Ruby Leigh
Scoop.it!

Leprosy Symptoms, Treatments, History, and Causes

Leprosy Symptoms, Treatments, History, and Causes | thescienceofmushrooms | Scoop.it
Learn more from WebMD about leprosy, a debilitating - and often misunderstood - infectious disease.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ruby Leigh from Health & Life Extension
Scoop.it!

Leprosy is the oldest ever human disease

Leprosy is the oldest ever human disease | thescienceofmushrooms | Scoop.it

New research suggests that leprosy (or Hansen’s disease) is the oldest ever disease to infect humans, with roots that likely stem back millions of years.


Via Tonya Scholz
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ruby Leigh from Miscellaneous Topics
Scoop.it!

Is leprosy the oldest infectious disease in humans?

Is leprosy the oldest infectious disease in humans? | thescienceofmushrooms | Scoop.it
A scientist at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Centre in Houston said humans carried leprosy bacteria when departing Africa around 100,000 years ago to populate the rest of the world.

Via David Simpson
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Ruby Leigh from Amazing Science
Scoop.it!

Leprosy spreads by reprogramming nerve cells into migratory stem cells

Leprosy spreads by reprogramming nerve cells into migratory stem cells | thescienceofmushrooms | Scoop.it

The surprising modus operandi of a neglected tropical disease could lead to new stem cell therapies.

 

The bacterium that causes leprosy spreads through the body by converting nerve cells into stem cells with migratory properties, according to research published today in the journal Cell. The new findings could improve treatments for leprosy and other infectious diseases caused by bacteria, and help clinicians to diagnose them earlier. They may also provide a safe method for developing stem cell treatments for a wide variety of other conditions.

 

Mycobacterium leprae is a parasitic bacterium that can only survive inside host cells. It evades detection by the host's immune system by infecting Schwann cells, the glial cells which form the fatty myelin tissue that insulates peripheral nerves and helps them to conduct impulses. Infected cells remain healthy in the early stages of infection but, soon enough, their myelin begins to degenerate, leading to the nerve damage, loss of sensation and blistering skin sores that are characteristic of the disease. 

Anura Rambukkana of the MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine at the University of Edinburgh and his colleagues isolated Schwann cells from adult mice, grew them in Petri dishes and infected them with M. leprae. They found that the bacterium gradually turns off the genes that give Schwann cells their characteristic properties, and then activates another set of genes that transforms them into something resembling neural crest stem cells, which are only present in the embryo, and which migrate from the developing nervous along various routes to form a wide variety of tissues, including muscle, bone, cartilage, and the Schwann cells and sensory neurons of the peripheral nerves.

 

This genetic reprogramming helps to disseminate the disease – infected cells revert to a stem cell-like state, then proliferate and convert into immature muscle cells or other cell types that migrate away from the initial infection site, carrying their bacterial load with them. By hiding out in the cells, the bacteria can spread through the body without triggering an immune response.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
more...
No comment yet.