The Dust Bowl-farmers
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Rain Follows the Plow?HW3

Rain Follows the Plow?HW3 | The Dust Bowl-farmers | Scoop.it
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A number of poor land management practices in the Great Plains region increased the vulnerability of the area before the 1930s drought. Some of the land use patterns and methods of cultivation in the region can be traced back to the settlement of the Great Plains nearly 100 years earlier. At that time, little was known of the region’s climate. Several expeditions had explored the region, but they were not studying the region for its agricultural potential, and, furthermore, their findings went into government reports that were not readily available to the general public (Fite, 1966).

 
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The Dust Bowl: Dark, dirty times TD2

The Dust Bowl: Dark, dirty times TD2 | The Dust Bowl-farmers | Scoop.it
In the late 1990s, I was casting about for a new career track. "Why dont you write a book about the Dust Bowl," said my aunt, Ardith Rieke, who had grown up in the 1930s on a farm in northeastern Colorado.
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In 2006, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Timothy Egan came out with "The Worst Hard Time." In it he assembled facts into a novel-like read, later winning the National Book Award. At Tattered Cover's LoDo store, he told me one of his best and previously untapped sources was the historical society in Springfield, located in Colorado's southeast corner, in the core area of distress.

Tonight, PBS will begin broadcasting "The Dust Bowl," a two-part documentary (the second part airs Monday) by Ken Burns and Dayton Duncan. They have also co-authored a new book — "The Dust Bowl: An Illustrated History" (Chronicle Books, October 2012) — that is heavy on photographs but rich in elegant, accessible prose.



Read more:The Dust Bowl: Dark, dirty times - The Denver Posthttp://www.denverpost.com/opinion/ci_22005922/dust-bowl-dark-dirty-times-lessons#ixzz2JQwVW3UU
Read The Denver Post's Terms of Use of its content: http://www.denverpost.com/termsofuse

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Why We Come to California PD3

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Flora Robertson
Shafter, 1940

Here comes the dust-storm
Watch the sky turn blue.
You better git out quick
Or it will smother you.

Here comes the grasshopper,
He comes a-jumpin' high.
He jumps away across the state
An' never bats an eye.

Here comes the river
it sure knows its stuff.
It takes our home and cattle,
An' leaves us feelin' tough.

Californy, Californy,
Here I come too.
With a coffee pot and skillet,
I'm a-comin' to you!

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The “Dirty Thirties” (otherwise known as the Dust Bowl)PD1

The “Dirty Thirties” (otherwise known as the Dust Bowl)PD1 | The Dust Bowl-farmers | Scoop.it
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Dear Family,
Did some of you think that you had a dust storm? I’ll tell you what it was. It was

us shaking our bedding, carpets, etc.
For over a week we have been having troublesome times. The dust is something

fierce. Sometimes it lets up enough so we can see around; even the sun may shine for a little time, then we have a frenzied time of cleaning, anticipating the comfort of a clean feeling once more.

We keep the doors and windows all shut tight, with wet papers on the sills. The tiny particles of dirt sift right through the walls. Two different times it has been an inch thick on my kitchen floor.

Our faces look like coal miners’, our hair is gray and stiff with dirt and we grind dirt in our teeth. We have to wash everything just before we eat it and make it as snappy as possible. Sometimes there is a fog all through the house and all we can do about it is sit on our dusty chairs and see that fog settle slowly and silently over everything.

When we open the door, swirling whirlwinds of soil beat against us unmercifully, and we are glad to go back inside and sit choking in the dirt. We couldn’t see the streetlight just in front of the house.

One morning, early, I went out during a lull, and when I started to return I couldn’t see the house. I knew the direction, so I kept on coming, and was quite close before I could even see the outline. It sure made me feel funny.

There has not been much school this week. It let up a little yesterday and Fred went with the janitor and they carried dirt out of the church by the scoopful. Four of them worked all afternoon. We were able to have church this morning, but I think many stayed home to clean.

A lot of dirt is blowing now, but it’s not dangerous to be out in it. This dirt is all loose, any little wind will stir it, and there will be no relief until we get rain. If it doesn’t come soon there will be lots of suffering. If we spit or blow our noses we get mud. We have quite a little trouble with our chests. I understand a good many have pneumonia.

As for gardens, we had ours plowed, but now we do not know whether we have more or less soil. It’s useless to plant anything.

Grace

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events during the dust bowl - Vocab list

events during the dust bowl - Vocab list | The Dust Bowl-farmers | Scoop.it
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1.Cultivation -To improve and prepare (land), as by plowing or fertilizing, for raising crops

2.Climatologist - The meteorological study of climates and their phenomena

3.Frenzied - Affected with or marked by frenzy; frantic

4.Lull - A relatively calm interval, as in a storm

5.Pneumonia - An acute or chronic disease marked by inflammation of the lungs and caused by viruses, bacteria, or other microorganisms and sometimes by physical and chemical irritants.

6.Catastrophes - A sudden violent change in the earth's surface; a cataclysm.

7.Gypsy - A person who moves from place to place as required for employment

8.Duds - A bomb, shell, or explosive round that fails to detonate.

9.unmercifully - Having or exhibiting no mercy; merciless.

10.vulnerability - Susceptible to physical or emotional injury

 

 

 

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Coping and Recovering HW2

Coping and Recovering HW2 | The Dust Bowl-farmers | Scoop.it
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During the 1930s, many measures were undertaken to relieve the direct impacts of droughts and to reduce the region’s vulnerability to the dry conditions. Many of these measures were initiated by the federal government, a relatively new practice. Before the 1930s drought, federal aid had generally been withheld in emergency situations in favor of individual and self-reliant approaches. This began to change with the development of the Great Depression in the late 1920s and the 1933 inauguration of President Franklin Delano Roosevelt. The depression helped “soften deep-rooted, hard-line attitudes of free enterprise, individualism, and the passive role of the government”, thus paving the way for Roosevelt’s New Deal programs, which in turn provided a framework for drought relief programs for the Great Plains (Warrick, 1980).

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Does the Dust Bowl stack up to today's disasters? TD1

Does the Dust Bowl stack up to today's disasters? TD1 | The Dust Bowl-farmers | Scoop.it
'The Dust Bowl belongs on the list of the top three, four, or five environmental catastrophes in world history,' according to historian Donald Worster of the University of Kansas.
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As disastrous as this year's drought has been — with up to 65% of the USA enduring drought conditions at one point in mid-September and likely billions of dollars in crop losses — it can't really compare to the decade-long tragedy of the Dust Bowl.

How bad was the drought of the 1930s? "The Dust Bowl belongs on the list of the top three, four, or five environmental catastrophes in world history," according to historian Donald Worster of the University of Kansas.

A combination of factors, including government incentives and several unusually wet years, led farmers to plant much of the region with wheat in the 1920s. A shortsighted and ill-advised farming practice — known as "the Great Plow-up" — occurred when farmers essentially gouged out huge swaths of topsoil to plant their wheat.

"People moved in and changed the ecosystem that had been there for thousands or millions of years," says climatologist Brian Fuchs of the National Drought Mitigation Center.

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I'd Rather Not Be on Relief PD2

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Lester Hunter
Shafter, 1938

We go around all dressed in rags
While the rest of the world goes neat,
And we have to be satisfied
With half enough to eat.
We have to live in lean-tos,
Or else we live in a tent,
For when we buy our bread and beans
There's nothing left for rent.

I'd rather not be on the rolls of relief,
Or work on the W. P. A.,
We'd rather work for the farmer
If the farmer could raise the pay;
Then the farmer could plant more cotton
And he'd get more money for spuds,
Instead of wearing patches,
We'd dress up in new duds.

From the east and west and north and south
Like a swarm of bees we come;
The migratory workers
Are worse off than a bum.
We go to Mr. Farmer
And ask him what he'll pay;
He says, "You gypsy workers
Can live on a buck a day."

I'd rather not be on the rolls of relief,
Or work on the W. P. A.,
We'd rather work for the farmer
If the farmer could raise the pay;
Then the farmer could plant more cotton
And he'd get more money for spuds,
Instead of wearing patches,
We'd dress up in new duds.

We don't ask for luxuries
Or even a feather bed.
But we're bound to raise the dickens
While our families are underfed.
Now the winter is on us
And the cotton picking is done,
What are we going to live on
While weirs wqiting for spuds to come?

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