The Writer
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The Writer
"Writing... Its a profession for introverts who want to tell you a story but don't want to make eye contact while doing it." ~John Green
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The Art of Being Still

The Art of Being Still | The Writer | Scoop.it
I transform the mundane task of grocery shopping into a writing exercise, and I become my character.
Kiera Xanthos's insight:

Living in the 21st century can have its perks, like television and computers being available every waking minute of the day, or its downfalls, such as the unlimited tasks and responsibilities lined up. Silas House talks of how so many writers have difficulty writing becuase they "don't have time". When, in reality, you can write whenever. House talks of writing when you travel to work, or are doing the simple, mundane tasks that make up your day. Silas House makes a point that, to be a writer, you do not have to constantly write all the time, just think and discover new ideas.

 

I agree that so many people dwell on the fact that "writers must constantly be writing" or "there is simply not enough time to write", when, in fact, that is fear talking. In reality, whether or not you have a pen to paper, you are constantly thinking. Most of the time, the thoughts are useless- so why not put those thoughts to use and think of the endless possibilities to write about?

 

 

House, Silas. "The Art of Being Still." Opinionator. The New York Times, 1 Dec. 2012. Web. 01 Apr. 2013.

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Assault on Writers From Automated Software

Assault on Writers From Automated Software | The Writer | Scoop.it
Sure writers can always write free articles and celebrity writers -- or writers interviewing and ghostwriting for celebrities -- will always be in demand. But what about other writers?
Kiera Xanthos's insight:

A new software has been made recently that collects data and writes articles and books using just the computer. This automated writing technology could put an end to authors as we know it. Technology these days have already dominated most industries, such as editing with their auto correct and spell checker on Microsoft Word. The  advances in technology also numb skills that used to be potent in humans, such as simple math equations. Today, advanced calculators will do the work for you as you just type in a few numbers. Will the writing industry become that of a calculator; a few words are plugged in and a machine generates the story?

 

As an aspiring author, I am deeply opposed to this form of writing (if you can call it that). Stories that originate from the minds of the author have true style and character no computer can copy. Will true, original work go unappreciated as technology advances?

 

 

Scott, Gini Graham. "Assault on Writers From Automated Software." The Huffington Post. TheHuffingtonPost.com, 29 Mar. 2013. Web. 01 Apr. 2013.

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The Lure of the Writer's Cabin

The Lure of the Writer's Cabin | The Writer | Scoop.it
From Heidegger’s hut to the Unabomber’s shack, we are drawn to the spaces in which writers create their work. But what do we hope to find?
Kiera Xanthos's insight:

Hundreds of renowned authors have some sort of secluded space to write their masterpieces. These places tend to be out of the way (some even went as far as to live in the middle of the woods for a few years). Almost every writer has a place to write- but what surprises most, when they see the writing spaces, is not necessarily where the writing annexes or cabins are situated, but rather what is in them. Most of the cabins are shockingly bare on the inside, housing just a bare chair and table. On lookers are shocked to realize that a lot of their works are not influenced by some sort of material. It is thought that the room being bare helps the writer due to the lack of distractions.

 

I am almost constantly surrounded by some type of noise. As I write this, my younger brother is talking rather loudly to my mom across the room. This lack of silence and distraction leads me to not producing the best pieces I can. Writers who have a silent sanctuary are simply seeking a place where their minds can function at their peak.

 

 

Wood, David. "The Lure of the Writer’s Cabin." Opinionator. The New York Times, 9 Dec. 2012. Web. 01 Apr. 2013.

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The Accidental Writer

The Accidental Writer | The Writer | Scoop.it
A path to a career is paved with the sometimes-painful experiences we make our own.
Kiera Xanthos's insight:

In this essay, Karen E. Bender describes her path to becoming an author. Out of all the events that have taken place in her life, it seems that the events that were most painful fueled her creativity. Bender is trying to inspire readers to take all that has happened in their life and channel it into their work, regardless of the impact on their life.

 

For her, whether it was getting hit on the head with a rock by a young boy, or moving to a strange city, the writer in her found new inspirations for her works. All the setbacks in life eventually helped her move forwards in her career. Bender's lesson is not to take everything others took from you, but rather to cope with what has been given to you and, to those willing, write a story about it, or just make peace with your past and figure out how you can make that rough past into a promising future.

 

Every time anything goes awry in my life, I tend to shove it away and hope to never come across it again. Unfortunately, this tactic is not very successful and the events usually come back to haunt me. With the technique Bender describes it will be easier for me to let go of past occurrences and create new, personal ideas for new writings.

 

 

Bender, Karen E. "ESSAY; The Accidental Writer." The New York Times. The New York Times, 27 Jan. 2013. Web. 01 Apr. 2013.

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Why Do So Many Writers Use Words That Might Be Difficult for Some Readers?

Why Do So Many Writers Use Words That Might Be Difficult for Some Readers? | The Writer | Scoop.it
Why Do So Many Writers Use Words That Might Be Difficult for Some Readers? - The Huffington Post
Kiera Xanthos's insight:

Laura Copeland answered the question "Why do so many writers use words that might be difficult for some readers" perfectly. While some writers love wordplay, others go the simpler route. While one may seem more sophisticated, the other is easier to get a picture of. Using simple words in your writing is harder to capture the exact picture you are trying to paint. To jump this hurdle, most writers resort to using words beyond the reader's vocabulary. Copeland makes a good point as to say that while it may seem the writer using larger words is a better writer, sometimes that assumption is wrong.

 

While using simpler words seems easier, most times it is not. Writers may think for hours before coming up with a truly original sentence from their mind without referring to a thesaurus.

 

To me, it takes true skill to paint a picture in a readers head without having to use an aid such as a thesaurus. While using a thesaurus may be the faster route, using your own vocabulary to tell the reader your story ensures not only readability, but a touch of personality to how you think and speak in everyday life.

 

 

Quora. "Why Do So Many Writers Use Words That Might Be Difficult for Some Readers?" The Huffington Post. TheHuffingtonPost.com, 11 Mar. 2013. Web. 01 Apr. 2013.

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7 Great Things About Being a Writer (and Seven More That Suck)

7 Great Things About Being a Writer (and Seven More That Suck) | The Writer | Scoop.it
One time I got a package containing a tattered copy of my book along with a handwritten note. To a writer, this is like going up to a stranger and telling them that a) they could use some plastic surgery, and b) you'd like to perform it yourself.
Kiera Xanthos's insight:

Jason Pinter delves into his mind and writes what the pros and cons are of being a writer. Obviously, writing is not glamorous all the time, such as when no one comes to your book signing or crazy fans stalk you or publishers reject you. While you may come across hard breaks, being a professional writer does have its perks, such as the joy of holding your published books, or fans caring enough to send a small note saying how much they loved your works.

 

Even though being a writer can be "hard" or "scary" those who are writers, normally never regret it. Through the let downs and crazy fans, there is a sense of pride and joy of being a writer that no amount of hate mail will ever kill. Pinter talks of his first years, as he struggled to become an author, but eventually, as ideas started flowing, he got to where he wanted to be in life: a happy, successful author.

 

Obviously, my career choice is not completely ideal. Being a writer has its risks, and even as a child I knew this. There is just that slim chance of getting your actual work published that keeps me moving and thinking about why writing is the right career option for me.

 

 

Pinter, Jason. "7 Great Things About Being a Writer (and Seven More That Suck)." The Huffington Post. TheHuffingtonPost.com, 30 Nov. 2012. Web. 01 Apr. 2013.

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Katarina Trubelja's comment, April 2, 2013 6:35 PM
The goal of this article written by Jason Pinter is to explain the pros and cons of being a writer. He talks about his experiences of becoming a writer, from everything he had to tolerate to everything he genuinely enjoyed. In the article, there were seven great things and seven bad things about being a writer. I found the article very interesting and I completely agree with Kiera that every profession has it benefits and its disadvantages. In every career there will be obstacles that one will have to face and it will undoubtedly be strenuous and toilsome. However, like Kiera mentions, in the same manner every profession will undoubtedly have its joys and it is the aspiration of those delights that is the motivation for every person. This career is very exciting to work in and is ever-changing which makes it interesting as well. Writing is also a form of expression, so it is not rigid and there are not rules by which you must express your thoughts. Regardless, I would not pursue this career because I am not very skilled with English nor creative. Finally, Kiera did a wonderful job in her reflection!
Maahnoor Shah's comment, April 2, 2013 8:26 PM
This article is by a best-selling author, Jason Pinter, and he shares all of the pros and cons of his craft. It is evident that he loves what he does, though he does go through ups and downs. I really liked how he shared his own personal experiences; I thought that was very interesting. He tells us 7 pros and 7 cons about what he does and backs them up with his personal experiences. I really like Kiera’s insight on this article and I like how she said that even though being a writer can be hard, writers never regret it. I also really like how she said that writing is not always glamorous, because it is definitely true and I did not realize some of the cons of being a writer before reading this. Definitely, writers, like most other professionals, go through difficult times but if they really love what they do, the good outshines the bad. Kiera acknowledges the fact that a writing career will have some hardships and how it keeps her motivated, and I really liked that. Overall, Kiera did an excellent job at not only summarizing the piece, but also giving her own insight.
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Act Like a Writer

Act Like a Writer | The Writer | Scoop.it
Writing fiction draws on many of the same skills that, as an actor, I have been practicing my entire life.
Kiera Xanthos's insight:

Molly Ringwald starred in numerous films that are, today, considered classics. While she may be a believable, breathtaking actress, Molly felt confined to acting in other people's worlds. Ringwald talks of how writers forge a special bond between themselves and their characters. She says that in films where the scripts are already made, there is little freedoms to be your own character.

 

Recently, Molly has started to write some works. She finds that her background as an actress helps her understand that you need to give freedom to your character. The less description to the character you give, the more the reader's imagination runs wild. As an actress who felt restrained by the pre scripted movies, Ringwald loves the idea of creating her own characters, as most writers do. They are a product of your own mind, not plated there by others.

 

Molly Ringwald talks how creating characters and making them your own is important in the writing process. She talks of how until you know your character, it is hard to be them. Given my limited theater experience, I agree with Molly. As I move forward with becoming a writer I will take all she says into consideration from using your background as a springboard to not giving too much away for the reader to create a person of their own imagination.

 

 

Ringwald, Molly. "Act Like a Writer." Opinionator. The New York Times, 18 Aug. 2012. Web. 01 Apr. 2013.

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