Limitless learning Universe
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Limitless learning Universe
Nature and the universe are a wonder. Insufficiently explored...
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Rare #microbes lead #scientists to discover new branch on the tree of life | #CBC #News

Rare #microbes lead #scientists to discover new branch on the tree of life | #CBC #News | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Canadian researchers have discovered a new kind of organism that’s so different from other living things that it doesn’t fit into the plant kingdom, the animal kingdom, or any other kingdom used to classify known organisms.
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Standard Model: The #physics that tells us what the #Universe is made of - 61 is the magic number

Standard Model: The #physics that tells us what the #Universe is made of - 61 is the magic number | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Everything around us is made of atoms, but it turns out that the building blocks of the Universe are far stranger than that

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New #antimatter gravity experiments begin at #CERN #LHC #physics #science

New #antimatter gravity experiments begin at #CERN #LHC #physics #science | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
We learn it at high school: Release two objects of different masses in the absence of friction forces and they fall down at the same rate in Earth's gravity. What we haven't learned, because it hasn't been directly measured ...
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Artificial General Intelligence is here, #Google #DeepMind unveil Impala #AGI #AI #tech #NWO

One of the most significant Artificial Intelligence (AI) milestones in history was quietly ushered into recently, the quest for Artificial General Intelligence (AGI). This is probably the most sought after goal in the entire field of computer science. With the introduction of the Impala architecture, DeepMind, the company behind AlphaGo and the self-learning AlphaZero, now has AGI firmly in its sights, and while many people predicted the first AGI’s would emerge in or around 2035 we know know that date should be 2018. A staggering 18 years early – even if Impala is, by all interpretations, a basic first generation AGI.

 

 

Firstly let us define AGI, since it’s been used by different people to mean lots of different things, including the latest, and also revolutionary breakthrough for “General AI” which was realized earlier. Unlike today’s so called narrow AI’s that can only learn one thing very well AGI is a single intelligence, or algorithm, that can learn multiple tasks and exhibits “positive memory transfer” when doing so, sometimes called meta-learning. During meta-learning, the acquisition of one skill helps the learner to pick up another new skill faster, just as we ourselves do when we’re learning, because it applies some of its previous “know-how” to the new task. In other words, one learns how to learn — and can generalize that to acquiring new skills, the way humans do. This has been the holy grail of AI for a long time.

 

As it currently exists, AI shows little ability to transfer learning towards new tasks. Typically, it must be trained anew every time from scratch, although even the way AI’s learn is changing as new more powerful AI’s being to figure out how to evolve and self-learn, like the ones from OpenAI and Baidu, which achieved the “Zero shot learning” goal, which both hit those milestones last year. For instance, the same neural network that makes recommendations to you for a Netflix show cannot use that learning to suddenly start making meaningful grocery recommendations. Even these single-instance “narrow” AIs can be impressive though, such as IBM Watson or Google’s self-driving car tech. However, these aren’t nearly so much so an artificial general intelligence, which could conceivably unlock the kind of recursive self-improvement variously referred to as the “intelligence explosion” or “Singularity” which many estimate will happen in the mid 2040’s.


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#Scientists draw new connections between #climate change and #warming #oceans #education #science

#Scientists draw new connections between #climate change and #warming #oceans #education #science | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
It happened once before, and it could happen again.
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Belly Fat Has a Role to Play in Fighting Infections #Omentum #education #medicine

Belly Fat Has a Role to Play in Fighting Infections #Omentum #education #medicine | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Hanging in front of the abdomen like an apron, the depot of visceral fat known as the omentum helps regulate immune responses.

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"Drunken Forests" in #Alaska Are Just Another Sign of #Melting #Permafrost #climate on the road to #extinction #education

"Drunken Forests" in #Alaska Are Just Another Sign of #Melting #Permafrost #climate on the road to #extinction #education | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Human activity is bad for the climate, but what waits under the Arctic is much worse.
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The Thing: Melting Siberian #permafrost reveals terrifying creatures (PHOTOS) — RT World News

The Thing: Melting Siberian #permafrost reveals terrifying creatures (PHOTOS) — RT World News | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it

The 2,500-year-old remains of an extraordinarily well-preserved Siberian 'Princess of Ukok’ were discovered on the Ukok Plateau in the Altay Mountains in 1993. The woman's remains were replete with tattoos, and she was found buried with a troupe of horses and a small stash of cannabis.


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#Arctic sea ice decline driving ocean #phytoplankton farther north #climate realities

#Arctic sea ice decline driving ocean #phytoplankton farther north #climate realities | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Phytoplankton blooms that form the base of the marine food web are expanding northward into ice-free waters where they have never been seen before, according to new research.
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Japan's Hopping Rovers Capture Amazing Views of #Asteroid #Ryugu (Video) | #Space #AsteroidMining #STEM

Japan's Hopping Rovers Capture Amazing Views of #Asteroid #Ryugu (Video) | #Space #AsteroidMining #STEM | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it

Two tiny, hopping rovers that landed on asteroid Ryugu last week have beamed back some incredible new views of the asteroid's rocky surface.


The Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA) Hayabusa2 sample-return mission dropped the two nearly identical rovers, named Minerva-II1A and Minerva-II1B, onto the surface of Ryugu on Sept. 21. In a new video from the eyes of Minerva-II1B, you can watch the sun move across the sky as its glaring sunlight reflects off the shiny rocks that cover Ryugu's surface.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?&tag=Space

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?&tag=Asteroid+Mining

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, September 30, 9:56 AM

Two tiny, hopping rovers that landed on asteroid Ryugu last week have beamed back some incredible new views of the asteroid's rocky surface.


The Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA) Hayabusa2 sample-return mission dropped the two nearly identical rovers, named Minerva-II1A and Minerva-II1B, onto the surface of Ryugu on Sept. 21. In a new video from the eyes of Minerva-II1B, you can watch the sun move across the sky as its glaring sunlight reflects off the shiny rocks that cover Ryugu's surface.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?&tag=Space

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?&tag=Asteroid+Mining

 

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#Scientists Say They've Found The Driver of False Beliefs, And It's Not a Lack of Intelligence #education

#Scientists Say They've Found The Driver of False Beliefs, And It's Not a Lack of Intelligence #education | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it

Why is it sometimes so hard to convince someone that the world is indeed a globe, or that climate change is actually caused by human activity, despite the overwhelming evidence?


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Perovskite #semiconductors seeing right through next generation X-ray detectors #tech #media #press

Perovskite #semiconductors seeing right through next generation X-ray detectors #tech #media #press | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
From observing celestial objects to medical imaging, the sensitive detection of X-rays plays a central role in countless applications. However, the methods used to detect them have undergone an interesting evolution of their ...
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'A single piece of plastic' can kill sea turtles, says study #science

'A single piece of plastic' can kill sea turtles, says study #science | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
New study: Ingesting even a single piece of plastic exposes sea turtles to a 20% chance of death.
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Artificial #fly #brain can tell who's who #FF #education

Artificial #fly #brain can tell who's who #FF #education | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Researchers have built a neural network that mimics the fruit fly's visual system and can distinguish and re-identify flies. This provides evidence that the humble fruit fly's vision is clearer than previously thought.
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How #biologists are creating life-like cells from scratch #gentech #education #science

How #biologists are creating life-like cells from scratch #gentech #education #science | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Built from the bottom up, synthetic cells and other creations are starting to come together and could soon test the boundaries of life.

 

There were just eight ingredients: two proteins, three buffering agents, two types of fat molecule and some chemical energy. But that was enough to create a flotilla of bouncing, pulsating blobs — rudimentary cell-like structures with some of the machinery necessary to divide on their own. To biophysicist Petra Schwille, the dancing creations in her lab represent an important step towards building a synthetic cell from the bottom up, something she has been working towards for the past ten years, most recently at the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry in Martinsried, Germany. “I have always been fascinated by this question, ‘What distinguishes life from non-living matter?’” she says. The challenge, according to Schwille, is to determine which components are needed to make a living system. In her perfect synthetic cell, she’d know every single factor that makes it tick.

 

Another key to making a cell is getting the software right. Enabling a synthetic cell to follow scientists’ instructions and to replicate itself will require some way of storing and retrieving information. For living systems, this is done by genes — from hundreds for some microbes, to tens of thousands for humans. How many genes a synthetic cell will need to run itself is a matter of healthy debate. Schwille and others would like to keep it in the neighbourhood of a few dozen. Others think that synthetic cells need 200–300 genes.

 

Some have chosen to start with something living. Synthetic biologist John Glass and his colleagues at the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI) in La Jolla, California, took one of the smallest-known microbial genomes on the planet, that of the bacterium Mycoplasma mycoides, and systematically disrupted its genes to identify the essential ones. Once they had that information, they chemically stitched together a minimal genome in the laboratory.

 

This synthesized genome contained 473 genes — about half of what was in the original organism — and it was transplanted into a related bacterial species, Mycoplasma capricolum9. In 2016, the team showed that this minimal synthetic genome could ‘boot up’ a free-living, although slow-growing organism10. Glass thinks that it will be hard to decrease that number much more: take any gene away, and it either kills the cells or slows their growth to near zero, he says.

 

He and his JCVI colleagues are compiling a list of ‘cellular tasks’ based on the latest version of their creation, JCVI-syn3.0a, which could act as a blueprint of a cell’s minimal to-do list. But for about 100 of these genes, they can’t identify what they do that makes them essential. As a next step, and supported by an NSF grant of nearly $1 million, Glass and Adamala will attempt to install the JCVI-syn3.0a genome into a synthetic liposome containing the machinery needed to convert DNA into protein, to see whether it can survive. In that case, both the software and the hardware of the cell would be synthetic from the start.

 

If it could grow and divide, that would be a tremendous step. But many argue that to truly represent a living system, it would also have to evolve and adapt to its environment. This is the goal with the most unpredictable results and also the biggest challenges, says Schwille. “A thing that just makes itself all the time is not life — although I would be happy with that!” she says. “For a cell to be living, it needs to develop new functionality.”

 

Glass’s team at the JCVI has been doing adaptive laboratory evolution experiments with JCVI-syn3.0a, selecting for organisms that grow faster in a nutrient-rich broth. So far, after about 400 divisions, he and his team have obtained cells that grow about 15% faster than the original organism. And they have seen a handful of gene-sequence changes popping up. But there’s no evidence yet of the microbe developing new cellular functions or increasing its fitness by leaps and bounds.

 

A little bit of messiness in biological systems is what allows them to improve their performance. Synthetic cells could lead to insights about how life might look on other planets. And synthetic bioreactors under a researcher’s complete control might offer new solutions to treating cancer, tackling antibiotic resistance or cleaning up toxic sites. Releasing such an organism into the human body or the environment would be risky, but a top-down engineered organism with unknown and unpredictable behaviors might be even riskier.

 

Synthetic living cells can also bring other philosophical and ethical questions: Will this be a life? Will it be autonomous? Will we control it? These conversations should take place between scientists and the public, before going too far into the projects. As for concerns that synthetic cells will run amok, many scientists are less worried. Many synthetic biologists will keep pushing ahead exploring the frontiers of life. The timing seems right, and scientists have the genomes, the parts list to work with. The minimal cell needs only a few hundred genes to have something that looks sort of alive. Hundreds of parts is a tremendous challenge, but it’s not thousands and that’s very exciting.

 

Nature 563, 172-175 (2018).

doi: 10.1038/d41586-018-07289-x

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#ESA approves gravitational-wave hunting spacecraft for 2034 #astronomy #science #physics

#ESA approves gravitational-wave hunting spacecraft for 2034 #astronomy #science #physics | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it

The triplet LISA spacecraft, which will use powerful lasers to measure ripples in space-time from supermassive black holes, have been green-lit.

 

After decades of development and delays, the European Space Agency has given the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna mission, designed to study gravitational waves in space, the official green light. The triplet spacecraft are now slated for launch in 2034.

 

“I think there’s a mixture of super-excitement and ‘at last’,” says Mark McCaughrean, ESA’s senior advisor for science & exploration. “We’re finally over the starting line – it’s great.”

 

LISA will be made up of three identical satellites orbiting the sun in a triangle formation, each 2.5 million kilometres from the next. The sides of the triangle will be powerful lasers bounced to and fro between the spacecraft.

 

As large objects like black holes move through space they cause gravitational waves, ripples which stretch and squeeze space-time. The LISA satellites will detect how these waves warp space via tiny changes in the distance the laser beams travel.

 

In order to detect these tiny changes, on scales less than a trillionth of a meter, LISA will have to shrug off cosmic rays and the particles and light from the sun. The LISA Pathfinder mission, a solo probe launched in December 2015, proved that this sensitivity was possible and galvanized researchers working to realize the full LISA mission. With such high sensitivity, one challenge will be sifting through colossal amounts of data to find the signals with the most scientific promise.

 

“That’s the amazing thing – we can hear everything in the universe with gravitational waves,” says McCaughrean. The prime targets for LISA observation, he says, will be merging supermassive black holes up to millions of times bigger than the black holes mergers detected in recent years by LIGO, the premier Earth-based gravitational wave observatory.

 

Since supermassive black holes spiral towards each other and merge much more slowly than smaller ones, LISA will be able to provide prior warning of any upcoming mergers to astronomers, offering a chance to observe them with other telescopes as well

“We’ll be able to see signals for months, so we’ll have time to point all these other telescopes at that point in the sky to see if there’s any other signals coming from that area when the merger happens,” says McCaughrean. This could yield further insight into how black holes and their collisions work.


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The spraying of #America poisoning the #soil people depend on! #greed #GMO #education #EU

The spraying of #America poisoning the #soil people depend on! #greed #GMO #education #EU | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
American agriculture dumps a billion pounds of pesticides on food, producing a truly toxic harvest...
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#tech #Smartphones and #tablets are causing mental #health problems in #children as young as two #science #education

#tech #Smartphones and #tablets are causing mental #health problems in #children as young as two #science #education | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Children as young as two are developing mental health problems because of smartphones and tablets, scientists warn.

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Mass loss of #wildlife caused by #human consumption, #WWF says on the road to sixth mass #extinction

Mass loss of #wildlife caused by #human consumption, #WWF says on the road to sixth mass #extinction | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
"Exploding consumption" has wiped out 60% of wildlife since 1970, conservationists say.
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First study on #climate change impact in #Mediterranean #education

First study on #climate change impact in #Mediterranean #education | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
As the Mediterranean Basin is experiencing the impact of climate change more than ever, an international network of scientists has worked together to synthesize the effects of climate change and environmental problems, as ...
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#Tornadoes are spinning up farther east in US, #science study finds

#Tornadoes are spinning up farther east in US, #science study finds | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Over the past few decades tornadoes have been shifting—decreasing in Oklahoma, Texas and Kansas but spinning up more in states along the Mississippi River and farther east, a new study shows. Scientists aren't quite certain ...
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Manmade quakes force Dutch to face future without gas #Netherlands #GBB

Manmade quakes force Dutch to face future without gas #Netherlands #GBB | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
When Nienke Bastiaans fell in love with and bought a 17th-century thatched house in a rural Dutch village, there was one person who warned about possible earthquakes due to gas extraction.
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New Technique Heals Wounds With Reprogrammed Skin Cells #medicine #health

New Technique Heals Wounds With Reprogrammed Skin Cells #medicine #health | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Besides healing wounds, this technique could be useful for repairing skin damage, countering the effects of aging, and better understanding skin cancer.

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Single molecule control for a millionth of a billionth of a second #science #FSC #mathematics

Single molecule control for a millionth of a billionth of a second #science #FSC #mathematics | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Physicists at the University of Bath have discovered how to manipulate and control individual molecules for a millionth of a billionth of a second, after being intrigued by some seemingly odd results.
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DO YOU TRUST THIS #COMPUTER? FullHD Original Documentary #AI #Science #tech 

Science fiction has long anticipated the rise of machine intelligence. Today, a new generation of self-learning computers have begun to reshape every aspec
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http://theday.co.uk/science/ai-is-bigger-threat-than-terror-says-scientist
CineversityTV's comment, September 17, 7:00 AM
https://www.newscientist.com/article/mg23931950-600-artificial-intelligence-is-about-to-revolutionise-warfare-be-afraid/ Pentagon invests 2 billion $ and it is not for help of Mankind but for supremacy of the USempire.