Limitless learning Universe
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Limitless learning Universe
Nature and the universe are a wonder. Insufficiently explored...
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#Scientists make first 'on demand' entanglement link #quantum entanglement #psysics #tech #Internet

#Scientists make first 'on demand' entanglement link #quantum entanglement #psysics #tech #Internet | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Researchers at QuTech in Delft have succeeded in generating quantum entanglement between two quantum chips faster than the entanglement is lost. Via a novel smart entanglement protocol and careful protection of the entanglement, ...
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Free speech is dead: #WikiLeaks' Julian #Assange deserved #Nobel Peace Prize, not the loss of liberty 

Free speech is dead: #WikiLeaks' Julian #Assange deserved #Nobel Peace Prize, not the loss of liberty  | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Souraya Faas: Western countries speak of the need for democracy and free speech around the world while silencing the messengers.
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Ultrasound-powered #nanorobots clear #bacteria and #toxins from #blood | #Kurzweil

Ultrasound-powered #nanorobots clear #bacteria and #toxins from #blood | #Kurzweil | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed tiny ultrasound-powered nanorobots that can swim through blood, removing harmful bacteria and the toxins they produce.


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Casting a $20 Million Mirror for the World’s Largest Telescope #astronomy #space #science

Casting a $20 Million Mirror for the World’s Largest Telescope #astronomy #space #science | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Building a mirror for any giant telescope is no simple feat. The sheer size of the glass, the nanometer precision of its curves, its carefully calculated optics, and the adaptive software required to run it make this a task of herculean proportions. But the recent castings of the 15-metric ton, off-axis mirrors for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT) forced engineers to push the design and manufacturing process beyond all previous limits.

Building the GMT is not a task of years, but of decades. The Giant Magellan Telescope Organization (GMTO) and a team at the University of Arizona's Richard F. Caris Mirror Laboratory cast the first of seven mirrors back in 2005; they expect to complete construction of the telescope in 2025. Once complete, it’s expected to be the largest telescope in the world. The seven 8.4-meter-wide mirrors will combine to serve as a 24.5-meter mirror telescope with 10 times the resolution of the Hubble Space Telescope. This will allow astronomers to gaze back in time to, they hope, the materialization of galaxies.

Each mirror costs US $20 million dollars and takes more than two years to build. Every stage of the manufacturing process calls for careful thought and meticulous planning. To begin, more than 17,000 kilograms of special glass are ordered and inspected for flaws. Next, a crew must build a 15-metric ton ceramic structure to serve as a mold for the glass, which they carefully place one chunk at a time. The glass is slowly melted and continuously spun in a furnace to create a parabolic shape, then cooled by fractions of degrees over the course of three months. And that’s only the beginning.

Once cooled, massive machinery lifts the mirror and tilts it to a vertical position. Engineers purge the ceramic mold from the mirror, wait for it to dry, and then rotate it again. They grind and refine the back of the mirror with exacting precision. Then they reposition the mirror in order to shape and polish the front face to within 20 nanometers of perfection—a process that takes about 18 months. Along the way, it undergoes four optical tests, some of which were engineered specifically for this project.

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#Science #neurobiology Researchers recreate a brain, piece by piece | #Research

#Science #neurobiology Researchers recreate a brain, piece by piece | #Research | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it

Researchers at the University of Tokyo have created a method for growing and connecting single neurons using geometric patterns to route the neurons more precisely, cell by cell.

The article, “Assembly and Connection of Micropatterned Single Neurons for Neuronal Network Formation,” appeared in Micromachines, a journal of molecular machinery.

Thus far researchers have created simple brain matter using “in vitro cultures,” a process that grows neurons haphazardly in a clump. The connections associated with these cultures are random, thereby making the brain tissue difficult to study.

“In vitro culture models are essential tools because they approximate relatively simple neuron networks and are experimentally controllable,” said study author Shotaro Yoshida. “These models have been instrumental to the field for decades. The problem is that they’re very difficult to control, since the neurons tend to make random connections with each other. If we can find methods to synthesize neuron networks in a more controlled fashion, it would likely spur major advances in our understanding of the brain.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?&tag=Brain...

 


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Gust MEES's curator insight, May 23, 5:37 PM

Researchers at the University of Tokyo have created a method for growing and connecting single neurons using geometric patterns to route the neurons more precisely, cell by cell.

The article, “Assembly and Connection of Micropatterned Single Neurons for Neuronal Network Formation,” appeared in Micromachines, a journal of molecular machinery.

Thus far researchers have created simple brain matter using “in vitro cultures,” a process that grows neurons haphazardly in a clump. The connections associated with these cultures are random, thereby making the brain tissue difficult to study.

“In vitro culture models are essential tools because they approximate relatively simple neuron networks and are experimentally controllable,” said study author Shotaro Yoshida. “These models have been instrumental to the field for decades. The problem is that they’re very difficult to control, since the neurons tend to make random connections with each other. If we can find methods to synthesize neuron networks in a more controlled fashion, it would likely spur major advances in our understanding of the brain.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?&tag=Brain...

 

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Terrifying wave of fifteen #earthquakes strikes #NewZealand

Terrifying wave of fifteen #earthquakes strikes #NewZealand | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
The four strongest earthquakes have centred around Seddon in the South Island, and are all likely aftershocks from the devastating Kaikoura earthquake in 2016.

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Method assembles cellulose #nanofibres into a material stronger than spider silk #science

Method assembles cellulose #nanofibres into a material stronger than spider silk #science | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Researchers in Sweden have produced a bio-based material that is reported to surpass the strength of all known bio-based materials whether fabricated or natural, including wood and spider silk.

Working with cellulose nanofibre (CNF), the essential building block of wood and other plant life, the researchers report that they have overcome the difficulty in translating the incredible mechanical properties of these nanofibres into larger, lightweight materials for use in airplanes, cars, furniture and other products.

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This password-stealing #malware uses #Facebook Messenger to spread further | #CyberSecurity #CyberCrime #PyRoMine 

This password-stealing #malware uses #Facebook Messenger to spread further | #CyberSecurity #CyberCrime #PyRoMine  | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it

A form of malware which uses fake Facebook Messenger messages to spread has suddenly surged back into life and has developed new tricks to steal passwords, steal cryptocurrency and engage in cryptojacking.

First uncovered in August last year, the malware used phishing messages over Facebook Messenger to direct victims to fake versions of websites like YouTube, at which point they are encouraged to download a malicious Chrome extension.

The malware has remained under the radar since then, at least until April when it appears to have suddenly spiked in activity, targeting Facebook users around the world.

Analysis by researchers at security company Trend Micro - which has dub the malware FacexWorm - said that while the malware is still spread via Facebook and exploits Google Chrome, many of its capabilities have been completely reworked.

New abilities include the capability to steal account credentials from selected websites, including Google as well as cryptocurrency websites. It also pushes cryptocurrency scams of its own and mines infected systems for additional currency.

But in order to conduct any of this activity, the malware needs to be installed on the system of a victim. Victims received a link out of the blue from a Facebook contact which directs to a fake YouTube page.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet/?&tag=Facebook

 


Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, May 2, 7:16 AM

A form of malware which uses fake Facebook Messenger messages to spread has suddenly surged back into life and has developed new tricks to steal passwords, steal cryptocurrency and engage in cryptojacking.

First uncovered in August last year, the malware used phishing messages over Facebook Messenger to direct victims to fake versions of websites like YouTube, at which point they are encouraged to download a malicious Chrome extension.

The malware has remained under the radar since then, at least until April when it appears to have suddenly spiked in activity, targeting Facebook users around the world.

Analysis by researchers at security company Trend Micro - which has dub the malware FacexWorm - said that while the malware is still spread via Facebook and exploits Google Chrome, many of its capabilities have been completely reworked.

New abilities include the capability to steal account credentials from selected websites, including Google as well as cryptocurrency websites. It also pushes cryptocurrency scams of its own and mines infected systems for additional currency.

But in order to conduct any of this activity, the malware needs to be installed on the system of a victim. Victims received a link out of the blue from a Facebook contact which directs to a fake YouTube page.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/securite-pc-et-internet/?&tag=Facebook

 

Zaina Roberts's comment, May 2, 12:00 PM
https://avgantivirushelpsupportnumber.wordpress.com/2018/05/02/the-importance-of-avg-antivirus-software-for-computer-users/
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#Entanglement observed in near-macroscopic objects #astronomy #physics

#Entanglement observed in near-macroscopic objects #astronomy #physics | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Perhaps the strangest prediction of quantum theory is entanglement, a phenomenon whereby two distant objects become intertwined in a manner that defies both classical physics and a common-sense understanding of reality.
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Lost planet gave birth to space rock’s diamonds #science #history #education

Lost planet gave birth to space rock’s diamonds #science #history #education | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Minerals in miniature gems point to origins in the early Solar System.
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VERY interesting read: The Big Bang Wasn't The Beginning, After All | #Research #STEM 

VERY interesting read: The Big Bang Wasn't The Beginning, After All | #Research #STEM  | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it

In the beginning, there was light, and matter, and antimatter, in an expanding and cooling Universe. But something else happened before.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?&tag=Space

 


Via Gust MEES
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Gust MEES's curator insight, April 8, 3:19 PM

In the beginning, there was light, and matter, and antimatter, in an expanding and cooling Universe. But something else happened before.

 

Learn more / En savoir plus / Mehr erfahren:

 

https://www.scoop.it/t/21st-century-innovative-technologies-and-developments/?&tag=Space

 

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#Racism a problem of almost all #countries #FF and thats a sign of #IQ #LOL #scpaegoating #fascism has many forms #science but what counts is #care #compassion #love

#Racism a problem of almost all #countries #FF and thats a sign of #IQ #LOL #scpaegoating #fascism has many forms #science but what counts is #care #compassion #love | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
French players Ousmane Dembele and Paul Pogba were targeted during France’s 3-1 friendly victory over Russia on Tuesday.
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#Sandia National Laboratories: Computer & information #sciences #Zmachine #Military systems #America

#Sandia National Laboratories: Computer & information #sciences #Zmachine #Military systems #America | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
The Labs Accomplishments publication recognizes some of Sandia’s best work.
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"Gut Feelings” Are The Product Of A "Wi-Fi" Connecting Human #Brains To One Another, Claims #Scientist

"Gut Feelings” Are The Product Of A "Wi-Fi" Connecting Human #Brains To One Another, Claims #Scientist | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it

Most of us know what our intuition feels like, but what causes it?

 

Digby Tantam, a professor of psychotherapy at the University of Sheffield, UK, thinks he has the answer and explains all in his new book The Interbrain. 


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#FF #Immunotherapy - the greatest #cancer hack ever #science #health #education

#FF #Immunotherapy - the greatest #cancer hack ever #science #health #education | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Logicearth medical writers explain how immunotherapy has potential to change how we see cancer treatment in the future and improve patient outcomes....

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New Form of #Carbon is Stronger Than #Graphene and #Diamond #physics #science

New Form of #Carbon is Stronger Than #Graphene and #Diamond #physics #science | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it

Some wonder-materials you hear from once, and that's it. But not graphene. A month barely goes by these days without us hearing about a new use for this amazing carbon allotrope.


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Researchers Identify #Bacteria and #Viruses Ejected from the #Ocean by #Aerosols from Breaking Waves

Researchers Identify #Bacteria and #Viruses Ejected from the #Ocean by #Aerosols from Breaking Waves | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it

Certain types of bacteria and viruses are readily ejected into the atmosphere when waves break while other taxa are less likely to be transported by sea spray into the air, researchers reported May 22, 2018.

 

An interdisciplinary team of scientists from Scripps Institution of Oceanography, the University of California San Diego, and the J. Craig Venter Institute (JCVI) reached this conclusion after replicating a phytoplankton bloom in a unique ocean-atmosphere wave facility developed by scientists in the National Science Foundation-funded Center for Aerosol Impacts on Chemistry of the Environment (CAICE) on the Scripps campus. They found that bacteria and viruses coated by waxy substances or lipids appear in greater quantity and are enriched in sea spray aerosols. According to researchers, the results suggest that the water-repellent properties of the surfaces of these microbes are what make them more likely to be cast out of the ocean as waves break at the sea surface.

 

The team in the National Science Foundation-funded study included chemists, oceanographers, microbiologists, geneticists, and pediatric medicine specialists who are attempting to understand how far potentially infectious bacteria and viruses can travel and if those that pose the greatest risks to public health are among those most likely to escape the ocean. In previous studies, individual members of the team have characterized sea spray aerosols, which form when waves break and bubbles burst at the ocean surface.

 

“Some of the bacteria we detected have been found on skin as well as in your gut, so they could be affecting your health—at this point, no one really knows the health effects of breathing in ocean microbes,” said Kim Prather, who has a joint appointment at UC San Diego’s Scripps Institution of Oceanography and the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry.

 

“We are trying to understand sources of environmental microbes using the unique ocean-atmosphere facilities we have developed here at Scripps. By breaking waves in fresh seawater in an isolated wave channel, UC San Diego is the only place in the world that can directly measure the microbes transferred from the ocean to the atmosphere.”  

 

Prather’s research group has previously shown how microbes have a nearly worldwide reach, able to travel tens of thousands of kilometers on the wind, sometimes re-entering the ocean and re-emerging from it along the journey. As they do, their chemical attributes, their ability to infect, and their effects on cloud formation and precipitation can evolve.

 

“In CAICE, we realized that many of the chemical components found in the aerosols are derived from living microorganisms in the ocean, so one of our first goals was to find out which ones are present in the water and then understand which of them are able to hitch a ride on the aerosol particles,” said Michael Burkart, a researcher at the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry at UC San Diego.

 

The study tapped into techniques developed in the Earth Microbiome Project, which was founded by co-author Rob Knight and others in 2010 to sample as many microbial communities as possible to understand the ecology of microbes and their interactions with humans.


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Cause of polycystic ovary syndrome discovered at last #women #science

Cause of polycystic ovary syndrome discovered at last #women #science | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
The most common cause of female infertility – polycystic ovary syndrome – may be caused by a hormonal imbalance before birth. The finding has led to a cure in mice, and a drug trial is set to begin in women later this year.

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#FF #science #AI Re-Creates Activity Patterns That #Brain Cells Use in Navigation

#FF #science #AI Re-Creates Activity Patterns That #Brain Cells Use in Navigation | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Scientific American is the essential guide to the most awe-inspiring advances in science and technology, explaining how they change our understanding of the world and shape our lives.
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Extreme mobility of mantis shrimp eyes #biology #science

Extreme mobility of mantis shrimp eyes #biology #science | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
New research, led by biologists from the University of Bristol, has uncovered fresh findings about the most mobile eyes in the animal kingdom - the eyes of the mantis shrimp.
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#Plants can use underground communication to find out when neighbors are stressed #Gaya

#Plants can use underground communication to find out when neighbors are stressed #Gaya | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Corn seedlings that grow close together give off underground signals that impact the growth of nearby plants, reports a study published May 2, 2018 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Velemir Ninkovic from the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Sweden, and colleagues.

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Unprecedented wave of large-mammal extinctions linked to ancient humans, study finds #science #history

Unprecedented wave of large-mammal extinctions linked to ancient humans, study finds #science #history | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it

Homo sapiens, Neanderthals and other recent human relatives may have begun hunting large mammal species down to size — by way of extinction — at least 90,000 years earlier than previously thought, says a new study published in the journal Science.

Elephant-dwarfing wooly mammoths, elephant-sized ground sloths and various saber-toothed cats highlighted the array of massive mammals roaming Earth between 2.6 million and 12,000 years ago. Prior research suggested that such large mammals began disappearing faster than their smaller counterparts — a phenomenon known as size-biased extinction — in Australia around 35,000 years ago.

 

 

With the help of emerging data from older fossil and geologic records, the new study estimated that this size-biased extinction started at least 125,000 years ago in Africa. By that point, the average African mammal was already 50 percent smaller than those on other continents, the study reported, despite the fact that larger landmasses can typically support larger mammals. But as humans migrated out of Africa, other size-biased extinctions began occurring in regions and on timelines that coincide with known human migration patterns, the researchers found. Over time, the average body size of mammals on those other continents approached and then fell well below Africa’s. Mammals that survived during the span were generally far smaller than those that went extinct.

 

The magnitude and scale of the recent size-biased extinction surpassed any other recorded during the last 66 million years, according to the study, which was led by the University of New Mexico’s Felisa Smith. “It wasn’t until human impacts started becoming a factor that large body sizes made mammals more vulnerable to extinction,” said the University of Nebraska-Lincoln’s Kate Lyons, who authored the study with Smith and colleagues from Stanford University and the University of California, San Diego. “The anthropological record indicates that Homo sapiens are identified as a species around 200,000 years ago, so this occurred not very long after the birth of us as a species. It just seems to be something that we do.

 

“From a life-history standpoint, it makes some sense. If you kill a rabbit, you’re going to feed your family for a night. If you can kill a large mammal, you’re going to feed your village.” By contrast, the research team found little support for the idea that climate change drove size-biased extinctions during the last 66 million years. Large and small mammals seemed equally vulnerable to temperature shifts throughout that span, the authors reported.


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#Oceans' Mysterious Magnetic Field Is Mapped in Stunning Detail from Space #education

#Oceans' Mysterious Magnetic Field Is Mapped in Stunning Detail from Space #education | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
A new 3D map shows how Earth's salty oceans contribute to the protective, magnetic field that surrounds the planet.

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Cheap and #Free Alternatives to Expensive #SEO Software #web #tech

Cheap and #Free Alternatives to Expensive #SEO Software #web #tech | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
SEO software isn’t cheap. Register for SEMRush and Moz and you’ve just said goodbye to over $300 a month. If you’re doing your own SEO or you have a very small SEO business, that’s a…

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#Nature #science #Monkeys' #brains synchronize as they collaborate to perform a motor task #Oneness #education  humans too, at least some. #LOL

#Nature #science #Monkeys' #brains synchronize as they collaborate to perform a motor task #Oneness #education  humans too, at least some. #LOL | Limitless learning Universe | Scoop.it
Though their purpose and function are still largely unknown, mirror neurons in the brain are believed by some neuroscientists to be central to how humans relate to each other. Deficiencies in mirror neurons might also pla
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