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Art, ingenuity and originality; our unique and personal expression
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Family by Lucy Tasseor Tutsweetok

Family by Lucy Tasseor Tutsweetok | cree8 | Scoop.it
Lucy Tasseor is from Arviat, the southernmost community on the Nunavut mainland, close to the geographical centre of Canada. The local stone, a tough grey steatite, is harder than the steel tools traditionally used by Arviat carvers. In the 1960s, Tasseor began creating a unique style of sculpture, simply by using an axe to chip away the hard stone. As Inuit Art expert Ingo Hessel explains: “[Arviat sculptors] communicate essential ideas of form and content with a minimum of elaboration.” Tasseor’s work is recognizable by its flat planes, with a distinct and simple use of incised line.
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Swampcat the slayer by Kawanabe Kyōsai

Swampcat the slayer by Kawanabe Kyōsai | cree8 | Scoop.it

Kawanabe Kyōsai (May 18, 1831–April 26, 1889) was a Japanese artist, in the words of a critic, "an individualist and an independent, perhaps the last virtuoso in traditional Japanese painting".

 

Living through the Edo period to the Meiji period, Kyōsai witnessed Japan transform itself from a feudal country into a modern state. Born at Koga, he was the son of a samurai. After working for a short time as a boy with Utagawa Kuniyoshi, he received his artistic training in the Kanō school, but soon abandoned the formal traditions for the greater freedom of the popular school.

 

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"The Painted Meadow" by Marilyn Kirsch

"The Painted Meadow" by Marilyn Kirsch | cree8 | Scoop.it

Contemporary Ar by Marilyn Kirsch

 

"The Painted Meadow":

(Painting, oil on canvas, 2010, 238.8 x 152.4 x 3.8 cm)

"I usually work in oil paint on canvas but also paint and draw on paper using gouache, pastel or pencil. Over the past few years I have also been working with photography and photo-collages.

The imagery in my work is somewhere between abstract and completely non-objective, except for some of my photographs. The photography often reveals the sources in the real world of my abstract work."

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Thorsten Dittrich, “Frühlingsantrag”

Thorsten Dittrich, “Frühlingsantrag” | cree8 | Scoop.it

Thorsten Dittrich, “Frühlingsantrag”, mixed media on paper canvas texture

 

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Seated Couple

Seated Couple | cree8 | Scoop.it

Seated Couple, 19th century (or earlier?)
Dogon Peoples, Mali
Sculpture, wood with applied coatings, copper alloy, ferrous metal, 58 x 31 x 14 cm

 

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Liu Bolin - The Real Life Invisible Man

Liu Bolin - The Real Life Invisible Man | cree8 | Scoop.it

 

Liu Bolin was moved to create his “Hiding in the City” series after the Chinese government destroyed Beijing artist village Suo Jia Cun in November 2005. At the time of this destruction, Liu Bolin had been working in Suo Jia Cun, which had been previously named Asia’s largest congregation of artists. Prompted by his emotional response to the demolition of this site, Liu decided to use his art as a means of silent protest, calling attention to the lack of protection Chinese artists had received from their own government.

 

Why do you choose urban landscapes for the majority of your work?

 

Bolin: In the development of Chinese society, we experienced movements which were against humanity and purged people’s minds. I chose to camouflage my body into the environment because this way, people will pay more attention to the background’s social property, and the meaning of my body disappeared in this environment as an individual. In one aspect, my works record the history of the development of Chinese society. Concern about the situation of Chinese reality is one important theme of my works. I am trying to ask, “How does our society develop? What are the problems in our society? Where is our direction leading?”

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House in Tamugimata by Morimura Ray in 1999

House in Tamugimata by Morimura Ray in 1999 | cree8 | Scoop.it

Morimura Ray has to be one of my favorite artists at the moment. Born in Tokyo, Japan in 1948, he graduated from Tokyo Gakugei University, and began his career as a painter using abstract, geometric forms. Later he turned to woodblock printmaking.

He is well established as a printmaker with regular solo exhibitions in Japan and the United States.

The use of geometric forms can still be found in the artist's print designs, making his work unique and forward thinking. He is an innovator that uses traditional techniques; marrying the old with the new to create beautiful imagery such as this:

House in Tamugimata by Morimura Ray in 1999

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Structure With Earth Tones by John McCaw

Structure With Earth Tones by John McCaw | cree8 | Scoop.it

John McCaw, “Structure With Earth Tones”, mixed media

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Joyfully I see Ten Caribou

Joyfully I see Ten Caribou | cree8 | Scoop.it

Joyfully I see Ten Caribou, 1959
Pootoogook (Canadian, 1889 - 1959)
stonecut, print

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