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Want Proof That Advertising Junk Food To Children Increases Obesity? Look At Quebec

Want Proof That Advertising Junk Food To Children Increases Obesity? Look At Quebec | The Web Assessor | Scoop.it
While the rest of North America has been letting advertising to young children run rampant, one smart Canadian province took a stand against fast-food companies. 32 years ago, Quebec put a ban on fast-food advertising to kids in electronic and print media. And guess how that turned out?


According to a recent study done by the University of British Columbia as reported by The New York Times, here’s the results.
Researchers found that a 32-year ban on fast-food advertising to kids in electronic and print media in Quebec resulted in a 13 percent reduction in fast-food expenditures and an estimated 2 billion to 4 billion fewer calories consumed by children in the province. While the rest of Canada has been experiencing the same explosion in childhood obesity seen here in the United States, Quebec has the lowest childhood obesity rate in Canada.

 

Read more: http://mommyish.com/childrearing/want-proof-that-advertising-junk-food-to-children-increases-obesity-look-at-quebec-778/#ixzz286ByCsi1

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Immigration and National Border Security (2011)

Immigration and National Border Security (2011) | The Web Assessor | Scoop.it

Immigration and National Border Security (2011)


The primary concern of immigration law is to maintain national security through border control and the ability of federal authorities to detect and deter threats from foreign terrorists on U.S. soil.

 

Entry-Exit Controls and Border Security

 

Every year, millions of foreigners enter the U.S. as "nonimmigrants" (visitors or workers of some type) for a limited period. Although they are expected to return home at the end of their visit, there is no effective means for detecting those who do not. In 1996, Congress passed the Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act, or IIRAIRA, with a provision (Section 110) requiring the former INS to set up a database to track this information within two years. But, due to objections from the tourism industry and others, full implementation was delayed.

 

After the terrorist attacks, Congress again mandated the implementation of a computerized entry-exit database. This database, called US-VISIT, was initiated in 2002 and began collecting biometric records on arriving foreign visitors in 2004. However, it still does not match them with departure records because no consistent exit system is in place. We rely on visitors to turn in their departure paperwork, which not only leaves us with inaccurate data of who remains in the country, but wastes resources on tracking down individuals who have already left. US-VISIT is currently applicable to nearly all international visitors, including Visa Waiver Program participants. However, it does not apply to some classes of Mexican and Canadian citizens or to foreign nationals admitted under certain visas, providing a loophole for terrorists and criminals to exploit.
Border security without coordinated exit-entry controls offers the U.S. no way of noticing whether a nonimmigrant overstays his visa in violation of immigration law. In the absence of such a system, enemies of our national security can more easily enter the U.S. as nonimmigrants and remain to threaten us from within. Most of the September 11 hijackers entered as nonimmigrants, and several overstayed their legal visas, undetected by law enforcement.
Monitoring Foreign Students (SEVIS)

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