The Translator- Darfur
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Tragedy

Tragedy | The Translator- Darfur | Scoop.it
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This photo exemplifies how sorrowful the region became during and after the genocide of Darfur. The man in the photo just look accustomed to death while holding a human skull. It just goes to show how poor and shattered the area became, physically and emotionally. 

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Darfur Genocide

Darfur Genocide | The Translator- Darfur | Scoop.it
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Even though this is probably a staged picture, it shows how excruciating the Darfur genocide was to the region. It is a shame that the group of people in this picture is only a slight proportion of the people affected by tragedy in central Africa. 

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The Translator: A Memoir: Daoud Hari: 9780812979176: Amazon.com: Books

The Translator: A Memoir

~ Daoud Hari (author) More about this product
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The Translator: A Memoir [Daoud Hari] on Amazon.com. *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. The young life of Daoud Hari–his friends call him David–has been one of bravery and mesmerizing adventure. The Translator is a suspenseful
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The Translator is about the life story of a boy named Daoud Hari, who is also the author of the book. It documents his journey which starts in his hometown which was invaded and destroyed by the Sudanese military. Much of the story resembles the life of Ishmael Beah without the child soldier part. One very excruciating scene is when he through a desert in Chad. David found a woman who had hung herself by a shawl, he asked the surviving villagers her story. He learned that her previous home was broken into by the Janjaweed and she and her three children were kidnapped and dropped off in the middle of this desert to die. Apparently this was not uncommon because the Janjaweed felt it was just as effective as shooting them, without wasting the bullets. Daoud spends much of his time roaming through Chad, Sudan, and Darfur trying to find a safe place. The reason he continues to go to new places is also to be a translator for reporters who are covering the story. He helps out media members from The United States, Canada, and all over Europe. David bounced in and out of camps, jails, and prisons. He went to Israel, Cairo, Chad, Sudan, and more. But he reached his final goal which was peace. He made it to America and now he works to report true accounts of Darfur as well as helping the people of Darfur return to their homes in peace.

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The Darfur Tragedy (washingtonpost.com)

The Darfur Tragedy (washingtonpost.com) | The Translator- Darfur | Scoop.it
Now in its fifth year, the conflict in the Darfur region of Sudan has claimed as many as 450,000 lives, displaced 2.5 million people and left up to 4 million dependent on outside aid. It also has made Sudan the world's most unstable nation for the second year in a row, according to an annual index of failed states. Though Sudan has tentatively agreed to allow more peacekeepers, Darfur's prospects for peace remain uncertain.
Matt Patterson's insight:

The Washington Post lists an interesting series of events in Sudan that stems from when Sudan first became a country in 1956. Just two years later, a military group pushed the government out for an Islamic state. Then in 1969, a large amount of oil was discovered in Sudan which led to conflicts because oil is crucial to the economy of African countries. Later on in 2003, the Darfur tragedy began. The article says two groups, the Sudanese Liberation Army and the Justice and Equality Movement, joined together in an attempt to overthrow the Sudanese government. However, the Janjaweed, a militia, was created in order to fend them off. The website lists events like, "Omar al-Bashir heads provisional government established under 2005 peace treaty." These events happened regularly in Sudan and Chad. I am under the impression that there was a new coup, militia, or civilian rule" running the government every 5 years or so. This goes to show how shattered Sudan was and how much they had to put up with as a nation. The website also says how Ali Muhammad Ali Abd-al-Rahman was charged for "war crimes against a state minister of humanitarian affairs". This account proves what kind of criminal action the Janjaweed committed and that they were eventually being charged which was a step in the right direction.

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This article talks about a meeting between the UN and the AU in order to monitor Chad and Sudan in hopes of finding peace between the two. As of 2008, tensions were still relatively hostile. The Sudanese government was still attacking Chad, despite the presidents of each country signing a resolution agreement. According to African News Service, over 200,000 people were killed in the Darfur but over 2.2 million people lost their homes. This has become the biggest problem because between Chad, Sudan and other neighboring countries, there is an enormous amount of homeless people but no place to put them.  Another problem is that if people were to join the village, that is just more mouths to feed, and food was limited. What is worse is that the fighting continued. Jan Eliasson claimed in the article, "And if there is no military solution, there is only a political solution. And for a political solution to come about, we have to sit down and talk." This means countries had to take a longer and diplomatic approach to this huge problem. But as they peacefully talked it out, citizens of Darfur, Sudan, and Chad kept dying. Eliasson also says, "The splintering of the movements is hindering the formation of a single negotiating team for any serious talks." He is mentioning the problems forming internally and saying the sides are being pushed further apart and therefore further from agreement. At this point, there is no end in sight for this battered region.

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Stopping the genocide in Darfur: Media plays a key role

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This is a personal record of the Darfur catastrophe from a person living in the African region. She says that the physical conflict is bad enough but the negligence of the world enhances it. People were being killed by the Janjaweed and other militia-like organizations, but they also died from lack of food and water. This is troubling because mass malnutrition in a country-wide spectrum is usually something that the USA and other dominant countries provide to other countries in times of need. Even worse is that the countries attempting to report on the story were the same ones that could substantially help the Darfur region. As of 2005 though, conferences were being held to determine the role of certain countries and what they need to do to assist Darfur (McNally). The article continues to talk about how certain investigative organizations are gathering information but it never talks about actions they plan to take. That goes to show the outlying problem in Darfur, outside countries were just talking the talk instead truly helping.

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The Janjaweed - Genocide in Darfur - YouTube

Video created by Johnathan Chen and Marcus Yee Notice: The video may contain images that could be disturbing to some. Viewer discretion is advised. NHD Docum...
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This small video clip displays the Janjaweed, a militaristic group that acted as an antagonist in the whole genocide. Daoud Hari, the author of "The Translator", can relate to this video because his village and many around him were destroyed by the Janjaweed. This undoubtedly, made the life of many Africans rougher than they ever would have been.

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Darfur Map

Darfur Map | The Translator- Darfur | Scoop.it
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As hot as Darfur is, this not the type of place to visit. The region of Darfur, which is between Chad and Sudan, is very rundown, unstructured, and not an ideal vacation spot. Unless you are looking for a place to do some volunteering by helping an impoverished country, don't visit Darfur.

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Sudan: History of a Broken Land

Sudan: History of a Broken Land | The Translator- Darfur | Scoop.it
From the author: It was the giant of Africa: a nation which once represented the greatest hope for peaceful coexistence between Arab and African, Muslim...
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The title, "Sudan: History of a Broken Land", perfectly describes the preeminent problem in the country of Sudan. The north and south were divided since day of the country's independence in 1956. Religion was a large aspect of the cultural division between the two. According to the video, the distribution of religion was so evenly cut that a man claimed he was discriminated against once he moved from North Sudan to South Sudan. That man was interviewed and he said when he was in school, he was taught Islamic studies. But he did not believe in this religion, plus he spoke English which was not used in his new hometown. But religion and language was only the beginning of Sudans problems. Britain played a major role in the country's internal conflict. Britain urged the nation to split and would not take no for an answer. The video says British officers would go into the north and shoot any political leaders who attempted to connect the halves of Sudan back together. The country seemed to have changed its governmental system every 5 or 6 years. Sudan bounced between coup or "civilian rule" or presidents. But none of these methods worked properly for the country. If anything, it made the citizens of Sudan choose sides just to have their sides abolished. The conflicts did not stop when the systems stopped working however. 

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For starters, the article 'Sudan's Final Solution' was written by Nicholas Kristof. Kristof happens to be one of the main characters in "The Translator" which is based on a the true story of Daoud Hari. Nicholas Kristof is the reporter the Daoud Hari translates for as the travel throughout Darfur getting information about the war. The article itself starts by telling how the Janjaweed consistently stormed into the villages of the Zaghawa tribes. Kristof even tells tragic stories of the cruel and unusual things that the Janjaweed did to certain villages throughout the African region between Chad and Sudan. One especially cruel tale was that of a boy who "had been shot in the neck and mouth and left for dead, but he was still alive." He then had to continue life without the support of his parents, who had been shot and killed by the terrorist-like militia. Kristof later mentions the intense discrimination by the Janjaweed saying, "There were 45 corpses, all killed because of the color of their skin, part of an officially sanctioned drive by Sudan's Arab government to purge the western Sudanese countryside of black-skinned non-Arabs."

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Stopping the genocide in Darfur: Media plays a key role

Stopping the genocide in Darfur: Media plays a key role | The Translator- Darfur | Scoop.it
Matt Patterson's insight:

This is a personal record of the Darfur catastrophe from a person living in the African region. She says that the physical conflict is bad enough but the negligence of the world enhances it. People were being killed by the Janjaweed and other militia-like organizations, but they also died from lack of food and water. This is troubling because mass malnutrition in a country-wide spectrum is usually something that the USA and other dominant countries provide to other countries in times of need. Even worse is that the countries attempting to report on the story were the same ones that could substantially help the Darfur region. As of 2005 though, conferences were being held to determine the role of certain countries and what they need to do to assist Darfur (McNally). The article continues to talk about how certain investigative organizations are gathering information but it never talks about actions they plan to take. That goes to show the outlying problem in Darfur, outside countries were just talking the talk instead truly helping.

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