The Business Start-Up scooped by Kirstine Østergaard
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The Business Start-Up scooped by Kirstine Østergaard
The Business Start-Up scooped by Kirstine Østergaard
Running a Start-up business separates the boys from the men, the women from the girls. So here's helping hand

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Scooped by Kirstine Østergaard
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5 TED Talks That Will Inspire You to Be a Better Entrepreneur

5 TED Talks That Will Inspire You to Be a Better Entrepreneur | The Business Start-Up scooped by Kirstine Østergaard | Scoop.it
Watch these videos when you have some down time or when you need a little extra motivation.
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Business Lessons From LinkedIn's Reid Hoffman

Business Lessons From LinkedIn's Reid Hoffman | The Business Start-Up scooped by Kirstine Østergaard | Scoop.it
Reid Hoffman is the  co-founder and executive chairman of LinkedIn, partner, Greylock. Reid has completely changed how companies find employees, how employees find jobs and how business people stay...
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Are You Taking Advantage of Your Unfair Advantage? (7 Examples)

Are You Taking Advantage of Your Unfair Advantage? (7 Examples) | The Business Start-Up scooped by Kirstine Østergaard | Scoop.it
I recently started to collect voicemail messages from my audience so that I could share their questions (and my answers) right in the middle of a podcast sess
Kirstine Østergaard's insight:

Besides your USP - Do you know your "unfair advantage "? Read on...

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KIDPRENEURS - Entrepreneurship for Kids

KIDPRENEURS - Entrepreneurship for Kids | The Business Start-Up scooped by Kirstine Østergaard | Scoop.it
Young Entrepreneurs with BIG ideas!
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I Started My Own Company: Ten Lessons I Learned ~ Levo League

I Started My Own Company: Ten Lessons I Learned ~ Levo League | The Business Start-Up scooped by Kirstine Østergaard | Scoop.it
ten lessons I learned in the first three months since I started my own company that may help you too.
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FI.co: Startuptelling: Startup Storytelling the SMART Way

FI.co: Startuptelling: Startup Storytelling the SMART Way | The Business Start-Up scooped by Kirstine Østergaard | Scoop.it
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Startuptelling: Startup Storytelling the SMART Way

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Founder Insight Posted by Joe Garza on 2015-04-04

The article, "Startuptelling: Startup Storytelling the SMART Way", was written by Ben Larson, the Director of the Summer 2015 Semester of the San Francisco Founder Institute. It has been republished with permission below.

I recently returned to Silicon Valley from an amazing whirlwind trip through Europe where I had the opportunity to work closely with early stage startup entrepreneurs in Athens, Lisbon, and Berlin. It all culminated in sharing the stage with some other incredible traveling entrepreneurs; such as Ziv Gillat (Founder of Eye-Fi), Adriana Gascoigne (Founder of Girls in Tech), Eren Bali (Founder of Udemy), and many others; at the Valley in Berlin conference.

As I traveled from city to city giving talks to aspiring entrepreneurs, there was one common theme I heavily addressed during each keynote. Through my involvement with the Founder Institute and educating international founders, I've discovered that early-stage entrepreneurs lack the ability to engage, inspire, and sell, which is basically an ineptitude to tell a story.

STARTUPTELLING
Whether you're an entrepreneur, wantrepreneur, or simply working on "the startup of you," you need to be aware of a problem plaguing the global professional world. People are having the most difficult time conveying their ideas to their audience in an inspiring manner. In the startup world, we refer to this as the pitch, but it's as simple as answering the question, "what do you do?"

The root of the problem lies in the approach. You can't just tell people what you're doing. There is no structure there. Then there is the old saying in Silicon Valley, "Don't tell me. Show me." But this only works if someone knows what they're looking at and why they're looking at it. So, how do we get people to truly understand your story?

It's really quite simple. 



SMART STORYTELLING
Storytelling is a very powerful tool when engaging your audience. It involves adjoining various unique elements into the explanation of "what you do." I've created a simple framework for you to consider the next time you pitch your product or self. This is storytelling the SMART way.

S: SET THE STAGE

When you set the stage, you are preparing your audience for the story they are about to hear. You can influence their vantage point, their disposition, and their level of empathy for your customer. Perhaps they are your customer. Here are a few examples of how you can set the stage:

Immersion: "Imagine you are walking down the street. You do this every day. And you encounter..." 
You've essentially placed your audience in the story and are building the narrative around them. When done effectively, you can then speak directly to their personal needs.
Empathy: "Meet Jane. Jane is a teacher. Every day, Jane has to..."
In this situation, you are introducing the audience to Jane's world and making them understand Jane's position through empathy.
Volume: "There were 250 million vehicles registered last year in the US, in which 90% of the owners reported..."
This is kind of a brute-force method where you are putting a large market size in front of the audience, then hopefully indicating a significantly large problem that you will be addressing.
Regardless of the tactic, your goal here is to immerse your audience into the world in which your story exists. You want them to feel the problem you are addressing. That being said, hopefully, you are addressing a problem, but that's a completely different discussion.

M: MANAGE EXPECTATIONS

After effectively engaging the audience, you then have the ability to guide the conversation. If you're pitching with a slide deck, you should be leading your audience along so that each following slide is answering a question that you've deliberately placed in their head. That's why we often start with the problem statement after setting the stage. Usually, the next logical slide is a solution. How you accomplish that solution is typically your product. So on and so forth.

Ensure that whatever information you are presenting is building up anticipation for what you are presenting next. Part of this is being careful about the information you choose to present. Irrelevant information could lead the audience off on a tangent, in which you then lose control. Manage the expectations of your audience by being very deliberate about the information you present and the questions you want them asking in their head.

A: ANSWER YOUR QUESTIONS

This is very obvious. You embed a question into the mind of your audience, and then you provide an answer. Simple enough? Do this properly, and everything flows perfectly.

R: REPEAT THE PROCESS

Continue this process of presenting information, embedding a question, and then answering the question. This will help you find the most logical way to navigate your presentation and present yourself as a very polished speaker.

T: TAKE ADVANTAGE

When you've effectively driven the conversation, you've placed yourself in a very powerful position. You've answered the questions you've wanted to answer as a part of a flowing narrative, and any loose-ends would be questions that intentionally drive the dialog after your pitch. Before you get to additional questions, however, there is the conclusion of the story.

It is at this point you want to end strong; emphatically. You confidently conclude the conversation with a concise statement that reiterates your inspirational goal, and you ASK for the audiences involvement. If it's an investor, you ask for money. If it's a potential team member, you tell them to jump on the rocketship. If it's a customer, you ask them to buy it now. Here's an example:

With the SMART storytelling framework, you will be able to engage and inspire your audience, and sell your product or services more effectively than ever before. I encourage you to give it a try, and let me know your thoughts below.



There is one last thing. The story is half the battle. The other half is you. In my next article, I will be discussing the three sole factors that make a successful entrepreneur. Stay tuned!

If you'd like to launch a company in Berlin, the Berlin Founder Institute is currently accepting applications. Apply today!
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5 Practical Tips for Perfecting Your Startup Pitch

5 Practical Tips for Perfecting Your Startup Pitch | The Business Start-Up scooped by Kirstine Østergaard | Scoop.it
We are living in the age of the entrepreneur -- more people are starting up, and it's ever important to stand out in the crowd.
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Learn how to launch your startups from successful entrepreneurs

Learn how to launch your startups from successful entrepreneurs | The Business Start-Up scooped by Kirstine Østergaard | Scoop.it
The Brain Twist a collection of interviews with successful entrepreneurs and doers. Steve Blank, Alex Osterwalder, Xavier Damman, Janice Fraser, Hiten Shah
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Pitching Sequoia? Here's the big question you'll need to answer

Pitching Sequoia? Here's the big question you'll need to answer | The Business Start-Up scooped by Kirstine Østergaard | Scoop.it
For the past six years we've held rehearsals for the LAUNCH Festival at Sequoia Capital's offices on Sand Hill Road. Startups from around the country and the world fly in for at least two mandatory...
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Seth Godin's Startup School podcast on Earwolf

Seth Godin's Startup School podcast on Earwolf | The Business Start-Up scooped by Kirstine Østergaard | Scoop.it
Seth Godin is a thought leader in the marketing and business world. In this rare live recording, hear Seth as he guides thirty entrepreneurs through a workshop exploring how they can build and run their dream business.
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