The Romantics
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John Keats : The Poetry Foundation

John Keats : The Poetry Foundation | The Romantics | Scoop.it
John Keats, who died at the age of twenty-five, had perhaps the most remarkable career of any English poet. He published only fifty-four poems, in three slim volumes and a few magazines. But at ...
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John Keats- Poets.org - Poetry, Poems, Bios & More

John Keats- Poets.org - Poetry, Poems, Bios & More | The Romantics | Scoop.it
English Romantic poet John Keats was born on October 31, 1795, in London.
The oldest of four children, he lost both his parents
at a young age. His father, a livery-stable keeper, died when Keats was eight;
his mother died of tuberculosis six year...
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge Quotes at BrainyQuote

Samuel Taylor Coleridge Quotes at BrainyQuote | The Romantics | Scoop.it
Enjoy the best Samuel Taylor Coleridge Quotes at BrainyQuote. Quotations by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, English Poet, Born October 21, 1772. Share with your friends.
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge- Poets.org - Poetry, Poems, Bios & More

Samuel Taylor Coleridge- Poets.org - Poetry, Poems, Bios & More | The Romantics | Scoop.it
Samuel Taylor Coleridge, a leader of the British Romantic movement, was born on October 21, 1772, in Devonshire, England. His father, a vicar of a parish and master of a grammar school, married twice and had fourteen children.
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William Blake : The Poetry Foundation

William Blake : The Poetry Foundation | The Romantics | Scoop.it
In his Life of William Blake (1863) Alexander Gilchrist warned his readers that Blake
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The William Blake Archive Homepage

The William Blake Archive Homepage | The Romantics | Scoop.it
A hypermedia archive sponsored by the Library of Congress and supported by the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
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William Blake - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

William Blake (28 November 1757 – 12 August 1827) was an English poet, painter, and printmaker. Largely unrecognised during his lifetime, Blake is now considered a seminal figure in the history of the poetry and visual arts of the Romantic Age. His prophetic poetry has been said to form "what is in proportion to its merits the least read body of poetry in the English language".[1] His visual artistry led one contemporary art critic to proclaim him "far and away the greatest artist Britain has ever produced".[2] In 2002, Blake was placed at number 38 in the BBC's poll of the 100 Greatest Britons.[3] Although he lived in London his entire life (except for three years spent in Felpham),[4] he produced a diverse and symbolically rich corpus, which embraced the imagination as "the body of God"[5] or "human existence itself".[6]

Considered mad by contemporaries for his idiosyncratic views, Blake is held in high regard by later critics for his expressiveness and creativity, and for the philosophical and mystical undercurrents within his work. His paintings and poetry have been characterised as part of the Romantic movement and "Pre-Romantic",[7] for its large appearance in the 18th century. Reverent of the Bible but hostile to the Church of England (indeed, to all forms of organised religion), Blake was influenced by the ideals and ambitions of the French and American revolutions,[8] though later he rejected many of these beliefs he maintained an amiable relationship with Thomas Paine, he was also influenced by thinkers such as Emanuel Swedenborg.[9] Despite these known influences, the singularity of Blake's work makes him difficult to classify. The 19th-century scholar William Rossetti characterised him as a "glorious luminary,"[10] and "a man not forestalled by predecessors, nor to be classed with contemporaries, nor to be replaced by known or readily surmisable successors".[11]

William Blake was born on 28 November 1757 at 28 Broad Street (now Broadwick St.) in Soho, London. He was the third of seven children,[13][14] two of whom died in infancy. Blake's father, James, was a hosier.[14] He attended school only long enough to learn reading and writing, leaving at the age of ten, and was otherwise educated at home by his mother Catherine Wright Armitage Blake.[15] The Blakes were dissenters, and believed to have belonged to the Moravian Church. Blake was baptised at St James's Church, designed by Sir Christopher Wren, Piccadilly, London. The Bible was an early and profound influence on Blake, and remained a source of inspiration throughout his life.

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BBC - History - Historic Figures: William Wordsworth (1770-1850)

BBC - History - Historic Figures: William Wordsworth (1770-1850) | The Romantics | Scoop.it
18th-19th century Romantic poet
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William Wordsworth- Poets.org - Poetry, Poems, Bios & More

William Wordsworth- Poets.org - Poetry, Poems, Bios & More | The Romantics | Scoop.it
On April 7, 1770, William Wordsworth was born in Cockermouth, Cumbria, England. Wordsworth's mother died when he was eight--this experience shapes much of his later work.
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The Romantic Period

This presentation was prepared in order to introduce The Romantic Period in England for undergraduate students who want to become an English Teacher.
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Poet: John Keats - All poems of John Keats

Poet: John Keats - All poems of John Keats | The Romantics | Scoop.it
Poet: John Keats - All poems of John Keats. poetry
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John Keats - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

John Keats (/ˈkts/; 31 October 1795 – 23 February 1821) was an English Romantic poet. He was one of the main figures of the second generation of Romantic poets along with Lord Byron and Percy Bysshe Shelley, despite his work only having been in publication for four years before his death.[1]

Although his poems were not generally well received by critics during his life, his reputation grew after his death, so that by the end of the 19th century he had become one of the most beloved of all English poets. He had a significant influence on a diverse range of poets and writers. Jorge Luis Borges stated that his first encounter with Keats was the most significant literary experience of his life.[2]

The poetry of Keats is characterised by sensual imagery, most notably in the series of odes. Today his poems and letters are some of the most popular and most analysed in English literature.

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Poet: Samuel Taylor Coleridge - All poems of Samuel Taylor Coleridge

Poet: Samuel Taylor Coleridge - All poems of Samuel Taylor Coleridge | The Romantics | Scoop.it
Poet: Samuel Taylor Coleridge - All poems of Samuel Taylor Coleridge. poetry
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Samuel Taylor Coleridge - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Samuel Taylor Coleridge (21 October 1772 – 25 July 1834) was an English poet, literary critic and philosopher who, with his friend William Wordsworth, was a founder of the Romantic Movement in England and a member of the Lake Poets. He wrote the poems The Rime of the Ancient Mariner and Kubla Khan, as well as the major prose work Biographia Literaria. His critical work, especially on Shakespeare, was highly influential, and he helped introduce German idealist philosophy to English-speaking culture. He coined many familiar words and phrases, including the celebrated suspension of disbelief. He was a major influence on Emerson, and American transcendentalism.

Throughout his adult life, Coleridge suffered from crippling bouts of anxiety and depression; it has been speculated by some that he suffered from bipolar disorder, a condition not identified during his lifetime.[1] Coleridge suffered from poor health that may have stemmed from a bout of rheumatic fever and other childhood illnesses. He was treated for these concerns with laudanum, which fostered a lifelong opium addiction.

Coleridge was born on 21 October 1772 in the country town of Ottery St Mary, Devon, England.[2] Samuel's father, the Reverend John Coleridge (1718–1781), was a well-respected vicar of the parish and headmaster of Henry VIII's Free Grammar School at Ottery. He had three children by his first wife. Samuel was the youngest of ten by Reverend Coleridge's second wife, Anne Bowden (1726–1809).[3] Coleridge suggests that he "took no pleasure in boyish sports" but instead read "incessantly" and played by himself.[4] After John Coleridge died in 1781, 8-year-old Samuel was sent to Christ's Hospital, a charity school founded in the 16th century in Greyfriars, London, where he remained throughout his childhood, studying and writing poetry. At that school Coleridge became friends with Charles Lamb, a schoolmate, and studied the works of Virgil and William Lisle Bowles.[5] In one of a series of autobiographical letters written to Thomas Poole, Coleridge wrote: "At six years old I remember to have read Belisarius, Robinson Crusoe, and Philip Quarll – and then I found the Arabian Nights' Entertainments – one tale of which (the tale of a man who was compelled to seek for a pure virgin) made so deep an impression on me (I had read it in the evening while my mother was mending stockings) that I was haunted by spectres whenever I was in the dark – and I distinctly remember the anxious and fearful eagerness with which I used to watch the window in which the books lay – and whenever the sun lay upon them, I would seize it, carry it by the wall, and bask, and read."

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Poet: William Blake - All poems of William Blake

Poet: William Blake - All poems of William Blake | The Romantics | Scoop.it
Poet: William Blake - All poems of William Blake. poetry
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William Blake- Poets.org - Poetry, Poems, Bios & More

William Blake- Poets.org - Poetry, Poems, Bios & More | The Romantics | Scoop.it
William Blake was born in London on November 28, 1757, to James, a hosier,
and Catherine Blake. Two of his six siblings died in infancy.
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William Wordsworth : The Poetry Foundation

William Wordsworth : The Poetry Foundation | The Romantics | Scoop.it
Discussing prose written by poets, Joseph Brodsky has remarked, “the tradition of dividing literature into poetry and prose dates from the ...
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William Wordsworth - Biography and Works. Search Texts, Read Online. Discuss.

William Wordsworth - Biography and Works. Search Texts, Read Online. Discuss. | The Romantics | Scoop.it
William Wordsworth. Biography of William Wordsworth and a searchable collection of works.
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William Wordsworth - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

William Wordsworth (7 April 1770 – 23 April 1850) was a major English Romantic poet who, with Samuel Taylor Coleridge, helped to launch the Romantic Age in English literature with the 1798 joint publication Lyrical Ballads.

Wordsworth's magnum opus is generally considered to be The Prelude, a semiautobiographical poem of his early years which he revised and expanded a number of times. It was posthumously titled and published, prior to which it was generally known as "the poem to Coleridge". Wordsworth was Britain's Poet Laureate from 1843 until his death in 1850.

The second of five children born to John Wordsworth and Ann Cookson, William Wordsworth was born on 7 April 1770 in Wordsworth House in Cockermouth, Cumberland[1]—part of the scenic region in northwest England, the Lake District. His sister, the poet and diarist Dorothy Wordsworth, to whom he was close all his life, was born the following year, and the two were baptised together. They had three other siblings: Richard, the eldest, who became a lawyer; John, born after Dorothy, who went to sea and died in 1805 when the ship of which he was Master, the Earl of Abergavenny, was wrecked off the south coast of England; and Christopher, the youngest, who entered the Church and rose to be Master of Trinity College, Cambridge.[2] Their father was a legal representative of James Lowther, 1st Earl of Lonsdale and, through his connections, lived in a large mansion in the small town. Wordsworth, as with his siblings, had little involvement with their father, and they would be distant from him until his death in 1783.[3]

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A Brief Guide to Romanticism- Poets.org - Poetry, Poems, Bios & More

A Brief Guide to Romanticism- Poets.org - Poetry, Poems, Bios & More | The Romantics | Scoop.it
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English literature: The Romantic Period | Infoplease.com

The Romantic Period At the turn of the century, fired by ideas of personal and political liberty and of the energy and sublimity of the natural
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