The Reluctant Fundamentalist Racism
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Lahore_Montage.JPG (501x596 pixels)

Lahore_Montage.JPG (501x596 pixels) | The Reluctant Fundamentalist    Racism | Scoop.it
Sezay Youssein's insight:

ALthough my book seems to have a dark and controversial theme of racism, the beauty of Pakistan is also mentioned quite frequently.  Changez's story is told in Lahore Pakistan, which is shown above.  You can see that this is a beautiful city and why Changez is constantly ready to talk about it to the foreigner.

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The Reluctant Fundamentalist (2012)

The Reluctant Fundamentalist (2012) | The Reluctant Fundamentalist    Racism | Scoop.it
Directed by Mira Nair. With Riz Ahmed, Kate Hudson, Liev Schreiber, Kiefer Sutherland. A young Pakistani man is chasing corporate success on Wall Street.
Sezay Youssein's insight:

This was a movie based off my book that is still in the works and will be comming out soon.  I like the idea that this great book could be made into a motion picture, but as usual the movie is straying from the point of the book.  From the general looks of it, the movie looks as if it focuses on the American that talks to changez and his mission, rather than the racism that Changez  had to face. However, I would still watch this movie to fully view how it compares and contrasts to the book.

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USATODAY.com - Post-9/11 workplace discrimination continues

Nearly four years after the terrorist attacks, Muslim, South Asian and Arab-American employees continue to report discrimination on the job.
Sezay Youssein's insight:

Post-9/11 workplace discrimination continuesis an article featured in USA Today. This article goes into the factor of work place discrimination in the work place for Muslim, South Asian and Arab-American employees from the moment after the attack all the way up to 2005. According to the article, “Nearly 280 claims of discrimination in the workplace were received by CAIR in 2004” (Stephanie, Post) Although the discrimination claims were lowered compared to the first two years of the attack, it is still stating the fact that it is still out in our very own jobs. The article gives in depth situations that have occurred in certain work workplaces such as the New York Plaza hotel and Fairmont Hotel Management lawsuits that came in 2001. In these lawsuits workers were called things along the lines of “Stupid Muslims” and it even went as far to have things like workers having “Taliban” written on their key holders by upper management. The lawsuit was later settled for $525,000.00. In conclusion, this article was mainly focused on the documented examples of workplace harassment geared towards people of Middle Eastern decent.

 

The article I chose was fitting to my theme of racism because of the facts given. This article gave specific accounts of racism much like Changez faced. For example, the article goes to describe a situation in which a hotel staff member of middle eastern decent was constantly harassed with vicious remarks of “Terroist” and “Osama bin Laden” This relates to my book because in one passage as changez was leaving work he was approached by a worker of the place he was evaluating which threatened to fight him and later scorned “Fucking Arab” (Hamid,117) in his direction. This was only one of the instances in which a situation from the article was like one in my book. I overall found this to be a great source because it gave a wide range of statistics with credible sources that would be excellent to use in a persuasiive website or a argument for a website.

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The convergence of civilizations.(THE OPTIMIST)

Sezay Youssein's insight:

The article of The convergence of civilizations by Charles Kenny is an article that states the many differences and similarities in values that Islamic countries such as Pakistan have compared to America. Overall this was an article that was mainly based of certain statistics and surveys taken within various countries in the middle east, while similar surveys were also being collected in America. The various topics that were mentioned in said surveys were female schooling, gay’s rights, environmental protection, democracy, and last but not least Racism. Overall the article found that in some instances the Middle eastern countries actually were more liberal than expected, and even went as far as being more liberal on the topic of Democracy then America its self ( 92% of Iran was for a democratic system, while only 86% of the US population in the survey was for it) Overall I really liked this article because of just how much I learned about the moral values of middle eastern countries and it also caught me up in my own theme of generalizing certain countries to be against liberal values.

 

Kenny’s piece overall did have a connection to my theme in the area of generalization and racism, due to how he examined what other countries ideals were over a period of time. Within my book The Reluctant Fundamentalist everyone views people of middle eastern descent as being close minded and violent people, but through this article it can be seen that generally the opinions are more liberal then thought. This was overall a great source because it connects to racism in a way that fights the stereotypes that the racist ideals within my book is based off of.

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The aftermath of September 11, 2001: The targeting of Arabs an Muslims in America.

Sezay Youssein's insight:

Changez constantly faces racism in the aftermath of this terrible attack. This article is perfect for stating and analyzing the cause and effects of racism. The article goes on to analyze the variety of aspects that build to the racism. One aspect described is the vicious propaganda spread into such major groups as the Jewish-American group of the ADL. The ADL is known to have a wide spectrum of influence in the Jewish community in America, with all this influence along with the natural hate going on with Islam in a moment of attack, the ADL decides to discredit all remarks of Islam Defenders to try and silence the racial struggle. Basically speaking the ADL blocks out all Arabian racism from media and newspapers, as if it isn’t going on, with all the influence this huge group has. One other major aspect was also discussed, patriotic racism. Patriotic racism is explained as, “a well-documented high correlation between international or domestic crises in which American citizens are seen as victims of foreign aggression and an increase in hostility towards non-white, non-Christian people the U.S.” (Akram) These two were just some of the many discussed. There was also talk of stereotyping, media-film demonizing, and political rationalization.

 

The Targeting of Arabs and Muslims in America was such a great piece on my topic simply because it was an exact description of what is described in my book. For example one of the topics discussed in the article was how media would blow-over or hardly go in depth into major acts of racism as if the media was not interested in the harsh realities of an Arab in the aftermath of the attack. The main character changez came into contact with this first hand when he was finding out about, “Pakistani cabdrivers were being beaten to with an inch of their lives; the FBI was raiding mosques, shops, and even people’s houses”(Hamid, 94) in a deli rather than the news or the paper. There are many other factors that connect in this piece because the piece focuses on Arab based racism much like what Changez, the main character, faces in this book. In general I found this article to be an in-depth examination of the conflicts within my book.

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The Reluctant Fundamentalist

The Reluctant Fundamentalist | The Reluctant Fundamentalist    Racism | Scoop.it
At a café table in Lahore, a bearded Pakistani man converses with an uneasy American stranger. As dusk deepens to night, he begins the ta...
Sezay Youssein's insight:

On a warm Pakistan summer day, a confused and possibly lost American wanders the street of Lahore, only to stumble upon a local, little does he know that he is far from a local. This Local is named Changez and has lived a temporary American dream which he gladly shares. Changez came to America on a scholarship to Princeton, shortly after his arrival he gradually climbs to the top of this Ivy League school, and earns prestigious ranks in the top ten. His life only gets better… for the moment. He earns a position in a high earning financial review firm while also maintaining a steady relationship with the girl of his dreams, everything was going well up until the attacks of September 11th, 2001, and his world is turned upside down. Soon after Changez is faced with harsh discrimination and struggles that change is dream life. How he is seen by others all affect him greatly for being Pakistani: he loses his job, his dream girl, and is ultimately forced to leave his dreams behind.

 

The overall theme of this book could best be characterized as equality. Don’t group all people from a certain country or race as the same; the actions of other people unknown to you should never have to have an effect on your life. Changez was a man that has worked harder than many in his field and earned the relationships he has built, yet he is shunned by society due to the attack. The theme is also heavily carried throughout because of all the potential Changez has for America and simply due to bigoted ideals his skills are simply ignored. Even his own boss exclaims how much he excels when he states, “Your instructors say you’ve got a bit of the warrior in you”(Hamid,44) All in all this theme is the perfect theme for this book, it related to it perfectly, contains various examples of said theme, and lastly it is a theme that is the soul foundation of the story.

 

The book the reluctant fundamentalist by Mohsin Hamid was in my opinion, a great read that I would gladly recommend to others. This book was great because of the relation I saw within this book. With the last name Youssein and of Muslim decent I could connect to some of the differences in treatment my family received after the attacks September 11. I had noticed that airport searches had become oddly more specific or that my father would get occasional remarks on his heavy accent. Overall this book was one that i would recommend to someone who loves a book that will fill you with different emotions.

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AMIDEAST

AMIDEAST | The Reluctant Fundamentalist    Racism | Scoop.it
AMIDEAST is a leading American non-profit organization engaged in international education, training and development activities in the Middle East and North Africa.
Sezay Youssein's insight:

Amid East was a great advocy find in the department of education.  I found this group to be very helpful in how they focus on helping ensure a strong educational bond between America and the Middle East.  This company helps create projects for American students abroad in middle eastern countries that help benefit the comunity and the local economy. Personally I  would gladly donate because of the shared benefits to everyone involved in these projects.

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Possible attack sites

Possible attack sites | The Reluctant Fundamentalist    Racism | Scoop.it
Sezay Youssein's insight:

My map shows the region of Air bases that were set up in Pakistan to monitor terrorist activity.  Although one would think that having more air bases in the country could provide safety to the country from the U.S., it is actually more targets.  Al Qaeda was known to specifically target U.S. air bases with mortar attacks and IED placement durring this war on terror. 

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THE RIGHT 9/11 PROBE.(Editorial)(Editorial)

Sezay Youssein's insight:

The article “The Flight 9/11 Probe” was an article within the New York Post. This article greatly focused on the aftermath of 9/11 and how this affected the foreign policy of America. The article overall greatly focuses on the new legislation passed by president Bush to enforce stricter immigration, a more stern security review team in homeland security, and last but not least a call for “more patriotic” (Right) employers in big government review fields. The article was one that focused on just some of the legal aftermath of 9/11, rather than just damage control concerning fixing the city up physically.

 

 

Within my book, the main character Changez faced with discrimination by authority figures almost immediately after the attack. For example after 9/11 once he was coming back into the country he was harassed by airport security for hours on end, compared to his coworkers who just had a simple walk through the security. Overall this article connects to my book because it deals with foreign policy strictness that he had to deal with almost immediately, once legislation was passed to basically make racial profiling of certain ethnicities perfectly legal. He was viewed as a threat by all almost immediately. A fair example of him being viewed as a threat was shown on his trip back from Manilla,"I was dispatched for a secondary inspection in a room where I sat on a metal bench next to a tattooed man in handcuffs" (75,Hamid) Overall this article relates to one of the conflicts of racism that Chagnez had to deal with, which was constantly being viewed as a threat until proven innocent.  This article was a great find for me because I obtained the knowledge to further understand just how it was legal for Changez to have to go through all of this.

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The global impact of terror: 9/11 and the India-Pakistan conflict - Udini

The events on 11, September 2001, have perceptibly transformed the conduct of international politics on several dimensions.
Sezay Youssein's insight:

The main character within my book Changez, is on constant deep thoughts on the struggle within his home country of Pakistan. This in depth commentary of the article The Global Impact of Terror: 9/11 and the India-Pakistan Conflict describes his fears perfectly. The commentary goes to summarize how after 9/11 president Bush was determined to face the threat of terrorism, while also recruiting as much foreign forces as possible. One of the forces that allied with America on this democratic crusade was India. India was a major factor for the U.S. in Intel, but also a major lead in skewed information. India was in a constant political and military rivalry with Pakistan, stating, "consider terrorism a state sponsored rather than a fringe activity"(Bhattacharya) Basically speaking this article summary is stating that India was a main lead in feeding the U.S. information that Pakistan sponsored the terrorist activity and their fore was worth sending troops into. Overall this article greatly goes into detail of Pakistan’s involvement in many ways including rumors of rival countries.

Changez was born and raised in Lahore, Pakistan. Throughout the book he makes various references as to just how much this home had mattered to him. However as the aftermath of the attacks progress he starts to fear more and more for his home country. Changez's fears are first noted as soon as he receives enough money to visit he states, " I was confronting the possibility that soon my country could be at war" (Hamid, 121) This article was a great connection because at first I couldn't comprehend why he would be worrying this early into the aftermath about Pakistan. Later on however, it made sense Changez knew of the possible conflict as soon as he heard about an assault on Indian parliament. Once India was involved, they would do all they could to out Pakistan as the true designated origin of the terrorism. The commentary in the article was perfect therefore making this article perfect because it was simple but also gave me the background of Pakistan and their role within the "future" war on terror in Changez's case.

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Carry Me Down

Carry Me Down | The Reluctant Fundamentalist    Racism | Scoop.it
John Egan is a misfit — "a twelve year old in the body of a grown man with the voice of a giant" — who diligently keeps a "log of lies." ...
Sezay Youssein's insight:

The book Carry my down, is based on a 12 year old boy John Egan that is seen as odd by many, but also claims to be a human lie detector.  This book seems like it would partially be a good read, but based off the short summary it seems to be really ocnfusing.  I like the idea of misunderstood boy, however I can't understand what theme or moral he would give to the story.  In general it looks liek it could actually come out to be a decent book, but I really can't see too much of a connection to " The Reluctant Fundamentalist" as it is.

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The 9/11 Decade - The Intelligence War

Immediately after 9/11, the US announced that 'the gloves were coming off' in the fight against al-Qaeda. In the first of three films on the aftermath of 9/1...
Sezay Youssein's insight:

The 9/11 Decade: Intelligence War is a documentary filmed by Aljazeera English, based on the U.S. tracking of the terrorist group Al Qaeda, responsible for the September 11th attacks on the world trade center. Within this documentary I saw a step by step breakdown on the search and the war on terror. Throughout the movie we see that Al Qaeda travels from Afghanistan, to Torra Borra (border of Afghanistan and Pakistan), to Pakistan, and then gradually flows into Iraq. The documentary itself was a great find because it was not only showing the movements of the terrorists, but also the aftermath. For example once Al Qaeda had moved from the Torra Borra Mountains into Pakistan territory, the U.S. could not fully engage due to being allied with Pakistan in this struggle. Al Qaeda had known this, The U.S. could only conduct small scale CIA raids, rather than bringing in actual military. The documentary goes on to show the struggle that local citizens of Pakistan faced in this time, such as suicide bombings and Al Qaedian raids. The documentary also fully dissects possible questions such as why the U.S. couldn’t engage (because of not being able to lead full on military operations on allied soil).

 

This documentary was a great connection to one of my sub-themes of 9/11 because it full on showed how Al Qaeda was traced within the Middle East but also the aftermath that was left of this operation. In relation to my main character Changez's situation, the aftermath that was discussed in this documentary, was the exact fears Changez had. Changez was seeing bits and pieces of the raids on possible terrorist bunkers through the news and was worried of this raids moving from Afghanistan to Pakistan. This documentary showed how his fears weren't too irrational, because the tensions within Pakistan were a legitimate issue. The U.S. targets did in fact go to Pakistan which is what Changez was constantly keeping updated on and ultimately fired for. This film was personally above the other films on my topic of 9/11 because while other films were mainly focusing on the aftermath in the U.S., this movie did some of that but also greatly followed the situation in the Middle East. Overall by doing that this film helped me get more insight into a specific country (Pakistan) more clearly.

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