Risk profiling, big data and the quantified self
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Risk profiling, big data and the quantified self
A look at some of the game-changing developments that will impact insurance pricing, underwriting, policyholder relationships and claims management
Curated by Karin Lloyd
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Orca Health’s new apps help MDs educate patients | mobihealthnews

Orca Health’s new apps help MDs educate patients | mobihealthnews | Risk profiling, big data and the quantified self | Scoop.it
Karin Lloyd's insight:

Enhances patient understanding and also useful for claims assessors to understand precisely what claimants are going through.

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FwdHealth Tracks And Reports Your Health To Employers In An Effort To Cut Insurance Costs

FwdHealth Tracks And Reports Your Health To Employers In An Effort To Cut Insurance Costs | Risk profiling, big data and the quantified self | Scoop.it
“ There's no doubt that the cost of healthcare in the U.S. is a hot topic of debate, but a new startup called FwdHealth is looking to join the conversation. The idea is pretty simple.”
Via Alex Butler
Karin Lloyd's insight:
Another way that organised groups can pool their data and, for now, partially underwrite themselves to demand the best insurance rates.
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IBM wants to use big data to predict heart disease long before it strikes

IBM wants to use big data to predict heart disease long before it strikes | Risk profiling, big data and the quantified self | Scoop.it
“ Can big data predict heart disease before today's doctors can? IBM thinks so. The company, joined by Sutter Health and Geisinger Health Systems, has received a $2 million grant to use big data anal...”
Via Alex Butler
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Where is wearable tech headed?

Where is wearable tech headed? | Risk profiling, big data and the quantified self | Scoop.it
Wearable technology is all the rage, and it’s only the beginning of an array of connected devices that will invade our homes, cars and even our bodies. Imagine a small adhesive strip that can collect intimate biological data and tell your smartphone that you need to apply sunscreen or hydrate. How about a sensor for service dogs that enables them to transmit “verbal” commands to their handlers? Around the world, researchers are working behind the scenes and around the clock on jaw-dropping applications for wearable technology, driving innovation into areas that were considered science fiction just a few years ago. We no longer just use technology. The fact that tech is now all around us, on us, and even in us has given birth to a new buzz phrase, the internet of things. The very diversity of internet of things applications is staggering, ranging from smart consumer products to devices that monitor health and behavior—human or animal. The first entries in the wearable tech space were watches and corrective lenses. Evolution brought health and fitness monitors to the scene. After that came smart watches and activity trackers. Samsung recently unveiled its new Android-powered Galaxy Gear smart watch, a touch-screen timepiece that acts as an extension of your smartphone to stream music, track exercise and fitness goals, install apps and make phone calls. With just one small wristband, Jawbone UP tracks sleeping, movement and eating patterns—real-time vital information for a holistic approach to optimal health. The driving force behind the development and adoption of IoT is the wireless connectivity that frees technology to be anywhere and do anything. Sensor-embedded devices can transmit our personal data to the cloud for analysis and safekeeping, but they can also connect to processors like smartphones and tablets that can negotiate data from multiple wearable devices. Wearable technology has the potential to enhance our surroundings, improve our health and change the way we interact with each other. The only two ingredients anyone needs to make the future a reality is imagination and a strong foundation of standards-based connectivity technology. So exactly where is wearable tech heading? The answer is the internet of everything!
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Consolidate this: Quantified self edition

Consolidate this: Quantified self edition | Risk profiling, big data and the quantified self | Scoop.it
“ There are too many choices available for consumers when it comes to devices and apps that track your steps or daily activities. What needs to happen is consolidation across the industry and a focus on storytelling, not just activity.”
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The Tricorder Is Here, And I've Used It On Myself

The Tricorder Is Here, And I've Used It On Myself | Risk profiling, big data and the quantified self | Scoop.it
“ Scanadu is getting closer to delivering the Scout, a portable device that could replace your thermometer and much, much more.”
Via Alex Butler
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A Social Network for Crohn’s Disease | MIT Technology Review

A Social Network for Crohn’s Disease | MIT Technology Review | Risk profiling, big data and the quantified self | Scoop.it
“ Patients are collaborating for better health — and, just maybe, radically reduced health-care costs.”
Via Alex Butler
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The Extremely Quantified Self: Meet Rachel Kalmar ... - AllThingsD

The Extremely Quantified Self: Meet Rachel Kalmar ... - AllThingsD | Risk profiling, big data and the quantified self | Scoop.it
“It's a stunt of giving up her body for science, and kind of a cool punk fashion statement -- and a daunting amount of syncing and charging.”
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Social Media and Patient Self-Care

Social Media and Patient Self-Care | Risk profiling, big data and the quantified self | Scoop.it
As more and more people use social media, ways to connect with others increase as well. One such use in recent years has been an increase in patients looking to social media for help in self-care. To see what role social media plays in this, we first have to look at what self-care means. A quick search for the term brings over 500,000 results. Self care definition While traditionally, this means taking time to relax and regroup (with my personal favorite way being to get a massage), joining an in-person support group, or even just going to regular doctor visits. Patients have now discovered social media as a very useful tool for them and their families. What are some ways social media is being used for self-care? Online Forums – Online forums have been around since the early 1970s in the form of online bulletin boards and electronic mailing lists. These have evolved over the years to very theme/topic specific forums. This gives groups of various sizes a chance to connect and exchange tips and tricks on how to deal with symptoms, find the best doctors for specific illnesses, and to simply connect with people who have the same diagnosis. Facebook groups and pages – Facebook has also proven itself as a great way to connect. WEGO Health is one such place that connects people with various diagnoses with peer and professional support, as well as providing them with a large source of information gathered from across the Internet.Tweet Chats – Thanks to the use of hashtags, Twitter has become popular for various groups to connect for weekly Tweet Chats. Based on a pre-arranged hashtag, patients and health activists can chat about various issues. One such longstanding chat is the weekly #PPDChat, which connects moms and dads dealing with PPD (Post Partum Depression) and PPMD (Post Partum Mood Disorder). Personal Blogs – The list of people sharing their own personal stories continues to grow as people reach out to help others dealing with similar situations. These bloggers often build a strong support system for each other to lean on and to help people new to whatever they are going through. The topics covered range from parents with children diagnosed with various illnesses, to patients blogging about their own struggle with diabetes, cancer or eating disorders. How does this translate to self-care? Thanks to the often-strong connections, forged due to shared experiences, these patients and caretakers have turned into health activists by reaching out to a larger community. This allows them and others to continue to improve their own health by having access to a larger pool of information than they normally would without the use of social media. It helps patients find new ways to take care of themselves and discover additional methods of tracking and maintaining their health. All of these are valuable tools in a large self-care arsenal needed to combat often-difficult situations and illnesses. For patients and caregivers located in remote locations and removed from more traditional methods, it is at times one of the few ways, sometimes the only way, to improve personal health maintenance.
Karin Lloyd's insight:
Another part of the healthcare revolution jigsaw...we are familiar with expert patients in GP practices, now they are everywhere and easily accessible. Once you have quantified yourself, you can connect with others to share health experiences, treatments, etc, or simply to link up with others with the same profile. Imagine you are able to improve your risk profile by following advice from your health community, or you are super healthy and you want to self-organise into a group to demand cheap insurance rates...
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Your doctor is going digital: What the rise of medtech means for you

Your doctor is going digital: What the rise of medtech means for you | Risk profiling, big data and the quantified self | Scoop.it
Five years into the future, doctors will be empowered with a wide array of exponential technologies and will become the most efficient they have ever been. Physicians or artificial intelligence systems will have the ability to know your health status, perhaps even before you do, thanks to the combination of three important factors: artificial intelligence, electronic medical records/digital medicine and sensor technology.
Karin Lloyd's insight:
What is the future of underwriting when a person's smartphone is more sophisticated than current underwriting tools? And when people know way more about their health risks than their choice of insurer? And when big data aggregation leads to more accurate risk profiling? ...
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