The Physics of Gymnastics and the Balance Beam
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A guide to gymnastics - Catalog - UW-Madison Libraries

A guide to gymnastics - Catalog - UW-Madison Libraries | The Physics of Gymnastics and the Balance Beam | Scoop.it
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A Guide to Gymnastics

 

Summary:

This book is another informative source on a few of the skills I would like to talk about in terms of physics and all of the forces and momentum that are going on while performing these skills.  It lacks on the physics information, but does an excellent job of describing each skill and how it should be executed. 

 

After doing all of this research I'm excited to get started on this paper, because gymnastics is something I'm very passionate about.

 

 

 

Musker, Frank; Casady, Donald; Irwin, Leslie. A Guide to Gymnastics. New York: The Macmillan Company, 1968. Print.

 

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Education in movement--gymnastics - Catalog - UW-Madison Libraries

Education in movement--gymnastics - Catalog - UW-Madison Libraries | The Physics of Gymnastics and the Balance Beam | Scoop.it
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Education in Movement

 

Summary:

This book doesn't have much information for physics on gymnastics, but the things I did find in it are jumping, takeoffs, and landings.  When you teach jumping and landing the first thing to emphasize is that the quality of the jump and landing is important.  When teaching landings, you should first be taught a yeilding landing  and it is important to use the balls of your feet.  A yeilding landing is one where the body absorbs the energy of the jump.

 

As I had mentioned before they is slim picking with this source for information, but they are a few key points.

 

 

 

Pleasance, Peggy; Cameron, W. McD. Education in Movement-Gymnastics. Oxford: Alden Press, 1971. Print.

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A scientific approach to women's gymnastics - Catalog - UW-Madison Libraries

A scientific approach to women's gymnastics - Catalog - UW-Madison Libraries | The Physics of Gymnastics and the Balance Beam | Scoop.it
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A Scientific Approach to Women's Gymnastics

 

Summary:

This book covers many gymnastics skills and how physics effects them.  From this source I plan on talking about takeoffs, landings, leaps, jumps, front walk over, front tuck, cartwheels, back handspring, and backward rotation.  A little insight on a few of the topics; angular momentum for a front walkover is initiated by the same technique used to assume a handstand position then after the hand placement, a forceful thrust from the free leg and a strong

push from the support leg.  This translates the body forward and at the same time, rotates it about an axis through the hands.  The object of a walkover is to continue rotating forward through the handstand position, a force must be exerted at takeoff to allow for rotation of the body.

 

 That is just one of many indepth explanations this book has about the physics of gymnastics.

 

 

 

Schmidt, Darlene Kraklow. A Scientific Approach to Women's Gymnastics. Salt Lake City: Brighton Publishing Company, 1980. Print.

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The AfterMatter » The Physics of Gymnastics: Vaulting and Newton’s Laws of Motion

"In gymnastics, gymnasts learn to manipulate their bodies in order to take advantage of Newton’s Laws of Motion so that they can pull off spectacular tricks. So, how do they do it?"

Amy Hart's insight:

The Physics of Gymnastics

 

Summary:

I found this article helpful with the physics aspect of gymnastics, as appose to just giving a description of gymnastics and how to do a particular skill.  It analyzes rotational velocity, air time, gravity, force, acceleration, Newton's Third Law of Motion, and angular momentum.  A brief description of how to increase the downward force when vaulting with a springboard.  One example is to just run faster toward the vault and springboard, because a higher velocity means a higher momentum.  This allows the gymanst to exert a greater downward force on the springboard, which launches her further into the air.

 

Caplan, Theo. The Physics of Gymanstics: Vaulting and Newton's Law of Motion. The Aftermatter, 2013. Internet (Web).

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Daneil Avery's curator insight, November 15, 2013 11:29 PM

 

 

Summary:

This article did give some examples of Newton's laws along with angular momentum in English. It was a good place. I would like to use this in the start of my paper explaining why the other topics I'm going to talk about act the way they do. The reader would benefit from something explained so well. I look forward to being able to use this.

 

 

 

"The AfterMatter » The Physics of Gymnastics: Vaulting and Newton’s Laws of Motion."The AfterMatter. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Nov. 2013.

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Physics and Gymnastics

Illustration of physics principles by two gymnasts enrolled in Jeremy Levy's physics 0110 course at the University of Pittsburgh.
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This ISN'T one of my 10 sources, but I wanted to scoop it because it was slightly informative.

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Credo Reference > Where Are You From?

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Gymnastics-The Columbia Encyclopedia

 

Summary:

Gymnastics became popular in the United States in the 20th century, but the Romans started practicing gymnastics in the 19th century and the Greeks were the ones who invented the gymnasium.  The sport is both a mens and womens sport, but each gender has different events they compete on.  Men compete on the rings, pommel horse, parallel bars, horizontal bar, vault, and floor exercise.  The women compete on the balance beam, uneven bars, floor exercise, and vault.  This article also touches on rhythmic gymnastics, but that is something slightly different that I won't be elaborating on.

 

"gymnastics." The Columbia Encyclopedia. New York: Columbia University Press, 2013. Credo Reference. Web. 29 October 2013.

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Complete book of gymnastics - Catalog - UW-Madison Libraries

Complete book of gymnastics - Catalog - UW-Madison Libraries | The Physics of Gymnastics and the Balance Beam | Scoop.it
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Complete Book of Gymnastics

 

Summary: A few of the main skills I want to explain are cartwheels, front tucks, and back handsprings.  This book is a good source for explaining these skills.  It doesn't touch a whole lot on the physics of gymnastics, but I was think I would be able to use my other sources that do a better job of explain physics of gymnastics.

 

 

 

Loken, Newton; Willoughy, Robert. Complete Book of Gymnastics. Englewood Cliffs: Pretice-Hall Inc., 1959. Print.

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A movement approach to educational gymnastics - Catalog - UW-Madison Libraries

A movement approach to educational gymnastics - Catalog - UW-Madison Libraries | The Physics of Gymnastics and the Balance Beam | Scoop.it
Amy Hart's insight:

A Movement Approach to Educational Gymanstics

 

Summary:

Timing factor of gymnastics skills, jumping, takeoffs and landings are the main pieces of information I will be taking out of this book.  Specfically the timing factor of gymnatics skills is important which is one of the things you are taught when you take a gymnastics class, but you are never told the physics of it.  The time factor is concerned with speed of motion and the amount of time used in an action.  Never, in natural movement is the speed quite as uniform , it all depends on the needs of the action. 

 

 

 

Morison, Ruth. A Movement Approach to Educational Gymanstics. Boston: Plays Inc., 1974. Print.

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Teaching gymnastics - Catalog - UW-Madison Libraries

Teaching gymnastics - Catalog - UW-Madison Libraries | The Physics of Gymnastics and the Balance Beam | Scoop.it
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Teaching Gymnastics

 

Summary:

In this book they talk about many topics, but the few things I will be using for my paper are balance, take offs, and landings.  Balance is considered an advanced theme but the beginnings  of balance are found in the basic ways of managing the body.  Weight bearing and stillness are the two movement ideas which together bring about equilibrium.  In order to understand balance it is helpful to consider the three phases of gaining, maintaining, and losing balance. 

 

When a gymnast is taking off, the aim of this is to get the body into the air and to do this gravity has to be overcome.  The last thing I will touch on with this source is landings.  The way to make a landing effective will depend upon what the body has been doing while in the air.

 

 

Mauldon, Elizabeth; Layson, J. Teaching Gymnastics. London: Macdonald & Evans Ltd, 1965. Print.

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The Twisted Physics of 5 Olympic Sports

The Twisted Physics of 5 Olympic Sports | The Physics of Gymnastics and the Balance Beam | Scoop.it
Take a look at the physics behind swimming, diving, gymnastics, archery and badminton.
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The Twisted Physics of 5 Olympic Sports

 

Summary:

This article has solidified what I have read in other sources.  Angular momentum is obviously a huge part of gymnastics--spinning and rotating in a turn or a tuck position.  The speed of a gymnast tumbling will increase to make up the difference and keep her total angular momentum constant.  Newton's Third Law of Motion is also very important in gymnastics.  In gymnastics this is done by pushing hard against the floor, balance beam, or vault, in turn these surfaces push back hard against the gymnast, which gives her lift into the air.

 

Moskowitz, Clara. The Twisted Physics of 5 Olympic Sports. Live Science Senior Writer, August 1, 2012. Internet (Web).

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Daneil Avery's curator insight, November 15, 2013 11:21 PM

 

 

Summary:

This was somthing is something I'm going to use for an extra example of why the diver needs to be in the air for a long time before they enter the water.This artical even though it's short provids a wonderful explonatin that is extremly conceptual. 

 

 

 

 "The Twisted Physics of 5 Olympic Sports." LiveScience.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 16 Nov. 2013.

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Gymnastics kinesiology : a manual of the mechanism of gymnastic movements - Catalog - UW-Madison Libraries

Gymnastics kinesiology : a manual of the mechanism of gymnastic movements - Catalog - UW-Madison Libraries | The Physics of Gymnastics and the Balance Beam | Scoop.it
Amy Hart's insight:

Gymnastics Kinesiology

 

Summary:

This book doesn't have an immense amount of information that I found for my topic, but it does explain gymnastics with gravity, inertia, and leverage.  An explanation about gravity for example if you raise your arm sideways  the abductors of your shoulder joint are still active in checking or controlling the speed of the movement.  This relates to many skills in gymnastics as in the back handspring or cartwheel.  Inertia comes into play because when you increase your speed in a tumbling pass you gain more powerful muscular contractions.  Where does leverage happen?  It appears when the amount of force necessary in the production of a movement depends on the other things on the relative leverage of the active muscles on one hand and of the weight on the other.

 

Skarstrom, William. Gymnastics Kinesiology. Springfield: American Physical Education Association, 1913. Print.

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British Gymnastics: What's Next? | The Couch Gymnast

British Gymnastics: What's Next? | The Couch Gymnast | The Physics of Gymnastics and the Balance Beam | Scoop.it

As the gym world will know, British gymnastics has all but lost its iconic star, Beth Tweddle, who has already stated that the London games would be her last, even if she stays in the sport for a little longer.


Via Sophia Thompson
Amy Hart's insight:

Britis Gymnastics: What's Next?

 

Summary:

Gymnastics talent is slowly deminishing in Britain unless Beth Tweddle decides to continue competing.  She stated at the London Olympics that it might be her last appearance.  Beth is now 28 years old which is very uncommon for someone her age to still be competing in gymnastics.  The time when people usually call it quits is early to mid-twenties.  She said she will know for sure about continuing to compete or not, if she can't physically do it or if her heart isn't in it anymore.

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