The original inhabitants of the local community area
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Reference List

Clay, M. M. (1991). Introducing a New Storybook to Young Readers. The reading Teacher, 45 (4), 264

 

NSW DET (2004). Aboriginal Education Training Policy. 

 

Gilbert, R. & Hoepper, B. (2014). Teaching Society and Environment. 5th Edition. South Melbourne: Cengage Learning Australia.

 

Mishra, P., & Koehler, M. J. (2006). Technological Pedagogical Content Knowledge: A new framework for teacher knowledge. Teachers College Record 108 (6), 1017-1054.

 

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The Rocks Dreaming Aboriginal Heritage Tour - The Rocks

The Rocks Dreaming Aboriginal Heritage Tour - The Rocks | The original inhabitants of the local community area | Scoop.it
Be touched by the most ancient human culture on earth in a 90-minute leisurely walkabout with an Aboriginal guide in The Rocks, and journey into DreamTime, the culture of Aboriginal People.
Joanna Lee's insight:

The Rocks Dreaming Aboriginal Heritage Tour highlights the unique cultural changes that have taken place in the heart of modern Sydney and its magnificent Harbour environment (The Rocks Dreaming Aboriginal heritage Tour, last viewed 13/04/14). This 90 minute walking excursion is a wonderful experiential and inquiry based learning activity ( Global Perspectives: A Framework for global education in Australian Schools, 2011) that will allow students to experience how the Gadigal people of Sydney lived in The Rocks area, how their culture was, and still is affected by British colonisation, and how the Gadigal people live today.  Students will discover how the Gadigal people, and their culture, have significantly contributed to the identity of the The Rocks suburb. The students will be welcomed traditionally by the Gadigal welcome to Country.

 

Teaching idea:

Pre excursion: Students are to discuss as a class their prior knowledge of the Gadigal People. By drawing on their prior knowledge , teachers can question and modify the students assumptions and beliefs of Indigenous cultures (Gilbert and Hopper, 2013). Ultimately, the excursion should then bring their facts/knowledge of the Gadigal people to life.

 

During excursion:  Students are to complete the entire walking excursion filling in a worksheet as they proceed. The worksheet will ask students to note key facts and sketch the sites visited or objects viewed. The worksheet will also ask questions on the excursion content to ensure content comprehension.

 

Post excursion/literacy task/ informal assessment: Children to discuss findings and opinions in class. The following activities could then take place:

Students could paint a dot painting as seen at the Rocks Discovery Museum, relating it to a Gadigal Dream Time story.Write a narrative from a Gadigal person’s perspective of life before colonisation.Write a narrative ( e.g letter to family in Britain or Diary entry) from a British settler perspective on the lifestyle, culture  and customs of the Cadigal people.

 

Formal assessment/literacy task: Students to write a factual account of the excursion, detailing the most interesting fact they learnt that day and why. 

 

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Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art :: The Collection :: Art Gallery NSW

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander art :: The Collection :: Art Gallery NSW | The original inhabitants of the local community area | Scoop.it
Joanna Lee's insight:

Integral to the Indigenous Australian culture is ‘identity’, that is, belonging to a clan, family, kinship group, language, stories and place, and most importantly ‘country’ (Gilbert and Hoepper, 2014). This concept may be foreign to many Stage 2 students, therefore, The New South Wales Art Gallery’s permanent exhibition ‘Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art’ provides great insight into the Indigenous Australian culture, exploring themes of Aboriginal and Torres Strait identity, belonging and religion.  Visiting ‘The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Art’ exhibition provides the students with the opportunity to ‘learn through a concrete experience’ (Global Perspectives: A framework for global education in Australian Schools, 2011) , and to be an active learner. The Exhibition is a permanent exhibition,  available for school groups to visit  free of charge ( bookings necessary).

Generic study notes are available to complement the learning experience and interactive workshops are available at an additional price.  

 

Teaching Idea: Students are to fill in a worksheet as a learning scaffold for a future assessment task. The worksheet will have two spaces available for the student to sketch two Indigenous Art works, and space for a short description of each. Students are to detail the artist, year and where the artwork came from.  Students are encouraged to select artworks produced in different mediums , for example, a bark painting, dot painting , sculpture or artifact, as well as from a different Indigenous nation group or area,  and era.

 

Assessment idea: Students will select one artwork they sketched, and conduct further research of the culture of the clan from which the artwork came, which can be either modern or traditional.  Students will present a three minute presentation of their chosen artwork explaining its cultural and religious significance, and give a short description of where the artist came from. The completion of this assessment demonstrates that students have synthesised their findings in a meaningful way ( Gilbert and Hopper, 2013) by communicating their findings to others.

 

Students’ work can be collated into a class book.

 

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Twelve Canoes

Twelve Canoes | The original inhabitants of the local community area | Scoop.it
12 Canoes is a broadband website presenting, in an artistic, cultural and educational context, the stories, art and environment of the Yolngu people who live around the Arafura swamp in north-eastern Arnhem Land.
Joanna Lee's insight:

12 Canoes ‘Language’ clip is a great tool to introduce the abstract concept of  the importance of meaning in Aboriginal  language. The English Language is a social construct or product of the society in which we live, and therefore does not respect the complexity and spiritual depth of Indigenous languages. The ‘Language’ link on the 12 Canoes website helps students to understand that Indigenous languages are integral to Indigenous Identities.

 

Aboriginal perspectives are incorporated into the HSIE syllabus to provide all students with the opportunity to learn about the Aboriginal history, society and cultures (DET 2004). The 12 canoes ‘Language’  link provides an opportunity for stage 2 students to ‘see’ and understand the Australian landscape, and indigenous culture through the lens of an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander.

 

Teaching Idea:

Discuss the following Inquiry questions prior to watching ‘Language’.

What is the importance of language?How can language enrich a culture?How can the integration of English and Aboriginal language damage Indigenous cultures?

 

After viewing ‘Language’/Informal assessment:

Discuss  what was meant by  ‘our language describes a different universe’.How does Aboriginal language differ from English? Why?Identify which Aboriginal language is used within the school’s local community.Students could then map out the different Aboriginal languages  of Australia to help students  visualize their multiplicity and highlight their diversity. 
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Dust Echoes: Ancient Stories, New Voices

Dust Echoes: Ancient Stories, New Voices | The original inhabitants of the local community area | Scoop.it
Ancient Stories, New Voices. Dust Echoes is a series of twelve animated dreamtime stories from Central Arnhem Land in Northern Australia
Joanna Lee's insight:

Dust Echoes is an interactive, multiplatform website created for Primary School students, as a tool to explore Ancient Dream Time stories of the Arnhem Land clans. Complex themes such as the diverse landscape of the Northern Territory, the Aboriginal Moiety and kinship systems, Indigenous spiritual beliefs, power and responsibility in the community, safety and survival in the bush, Indigenous ceremonies and traditional art and craft techniques, duty to ‘country’ and Aboriginal custom and law are authentically represented. The content is relatable to children, through the medium of animation ( Punya and Koehler, 2006). This website meets the Aboriginal Education k-12 selection criteria, and is endorsed by the Djilpin Arts Aboriginal Corporation in Arnhem Land.

 

Teaching Idea : Before introducing the Dust Echoes Dream Time stories, ask students to brainstorm stories they know, for example, religious stories, fairy tales, ghost stories, stories they know from picture books/television programs. Establish the idea that stories are integral in our everyday lives.  Ask students to identify who tells stories in their lives ,and question the purpose of why these stories are told. Next, ask the class if they are familiar with any Indigenous Australian Dream Time stories, and ask what is the purpose of these stories. By drawing on students prior knowledge, ‘experiences and interests as starting points ( Gilbert and Hoepper, 2013, pg 59) the content becomes more relatable and engaging.

 

After viewing the website and watching a few clips as a class, students are then to discuss the major similarities and differences of Dream Time stories and other types of stories in regards to content, purpose and cultural value (informal assessment). Teachers could then divide students into groups and let the students explore the website further. Teachers could extend this learning experience by inviting a local Indigenous story teller to the class,  to tell a Dream Time story from the local community.

 

Assessment:

Research and present an Aboriginal Dream Time story from the students’ local areas.

 

Literacy strategy/informal assessment:

Create a story board of one of the Dust Echoes Dream Time stories, detailing film techniques. 
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Mapping Indigenous Cultures: Population and Cultural Database of Indigenous Ethnic Communities

Mapping Indigenous Cultures: Population and Cultural Database of Indigenous Ethnic Communities | The original inhabitants of the local community area | Scoop.it
Mapping Indigenous Cultures: Research ethnic communities throughout the globe with this indigenous community database documenting native cultures and tribal populations.
Joanna Lee's insight:

This website can be used to demonstrate to students that Indigenous people live sparsely around the globe, and that Indigenous cultures significantly contribute to their local, national and international identities. This website is not geared for stage 2 students, however with adequate planning and scaffolding, the students can be guided by the teacher/ worksheet. This website lists multiple Indigenous cultures from Africa, Asia and Latin America accompanied by photographs of children and families within these cultures.  This website is a wonderful tool to introduce the sheer volume of Indigenous cultures that exist around the world to Stage 2 students, and is a great research platform to start students developing ideas about different indigenous cultures,  their lifestyle and religions. This website helps students to learn about the whole world, and to appreciate people from all cultural groups from their classroom and beyond. Importantly, this website enables students to ‘think critically about bias and stereotypical images ‘ (Browett and Ashman, 2010, pg 7) and preconceived assumptions held about Indigenous people.

 

Teaching Idea: Students are to discuss the following inquiry questions before looking at the website.

What does indigenous mean?What is identity? Can it be shared?What is culture?What are values, beliefs and attitudes?What does it mean to be from a country? E.g  Australian  or Japanese or Peruvian?What is a citizen? What is a global citizen?

Ideas to be displayed on the white board.  

 

Once these concepts have been critically examined and students are satisfied with the answers produced, students are then introduced to the website, with a worksheet provided. The worksheet will ask students to chose an Indigenous group from the list on the website  ( teacher to ensure no double ups).  The work sheet will ask them to use the internet to research the name of the Indigenous culture, language/s spoken, religious beliefs, population, lifestyle ( traditional or contemporary), average life expectancy including birth and death rates, ceremonies and  rituals.

 

Informal assessment :

Students will create a Venn Diagram to list the similarities and differences between Australian culture and their chosen culture.  As a class, discuss as to why the lives of these Indigenous people are different from their  their own, developing an interpretive form of knowledge, where students are thinking about why things are the way they are ( Gilbert and Hoepper, 2011, p. 48). As a class, students can then label the geographic location of their indigenous culture on a class map, so students can visualize the geographical diversity of Indigenous cultures from around the world. 

 

Assessment idea:

Students could present their Indigenous culture to the class in the form of a poster. 
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