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The Mobile Health Paradox: Why Data Isn’t Nearly Enough

The Mobile Health Paradox: Why Data Isn’t Nearly Enough | The mobile health (salud móvil) | Scoop.it

With almost five billion mobile phone users in the world, of which two billion are smartphones, mobile health (also known as m-health or connected health) has been lauded as an attractive solution to address the challenges of the rising costs of chronic morbidities.

 

Moreover, the ubiquity of smartphones has led to a burgeoning market for m-health apps and wearable devices, resulting in more health data being collected than ever before. This has given rise to a phenomenon known as “the quantified self,” the process of tracking everyday activities to learn more about yourself.

 

For example, it is now possible for individuals to know their average time spent in REM sleep over three months and whether their sleep quality correlates with bad weather. One can now check their blood pressure, oxygen saturations and ECG in a single device, receive a fullgenetic analysis for less than $100 and soon be able to keep track of real-time glucose levels thanks to Bluetooth enabled contact lenses.

 

A simple look at Apple’s Health app yields no less than 79 different health records, spanning Vitamins A through E, variations in body temperature and caffeine levels.

 

A new mobile app takes the obsession to quantify into the bedroom, by helping individuals track their sexual encounters on their smartphones. The app collects information on the sexual duration and noise levels in order to quantitatively assess the user’s performance, presenting the data in a series of attractive graphs.

 

http://techcrunch.com/2016/02/10/the-mobile-health-paradox-why-data-isnt-nearly-enough/

 

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The mobile health (salud móvil)
Salud movil, mhealth, apps de salud, salud digital, salud a través de dispositivos móviles, ... http://www.saludsocialmedia.com
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MHealth in Clinical Trials Report: Just 37% of companies utilize technologies

MHealth in Clinical Trials Report: Just 37% of companies utilize technologies | The mobile health (salud móvil) | Scoop.it

Based on 261 responses representing pharma, CROs and service providers split across North America, Europe and Asia, the survey results offer an insight into perceptions and implementation of technological innovations in clinical trials today. The results reveal mHealth to be one of the brightest hopes within clinical trials, but also that a number of challenges first need to be overcome before full implementation.

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Apple Is Researching How iPhones Can Be Used To Monitor Parkinson's Patients

Apple Is Researching How iPhones Can Be Used To Monitor Parkinson's Patients | The mobile health (salud móvil) | Scoop.it
The company is looking into whether its devices can be used to monitor data in real time on well-being of patients, say three sources.
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MHealth: How apps are helping the healthcare sector - Digital Health Age

MHealth: How apps are helping the healthcare sector - Digital Health Age | The mobile health (salud móvil) | Scoop.it
Healthcare technology is now a major disruptor in an industry where population is stretching the resources on the NHS. With 1.5 billion global unit sales of smartphones this year. Ten years from now everyone from teens to the elderly will be carrying a smartphone, and these mobile devices will be far smarter than they are today. In addition to being location aware, the smartphone of the future will be situationally and contextually aware. The market for mobile health apps this year has quadrupled to $400 million, according to ABI Research, radically changing the way health care is delivered and accessed.

 An example of this, last year, Pocket App, the UK’s largest independent app developer, launched a new ‘Breast Awareness’ mobile app. The app was designed as an innovative method of engaging with a wider audience via mobile to raise awareness of the symptoms of breast cancer. The interactive app was developed in collaboration with Breast Cancer Care, it featured a quiz that encourages women to become more breast aware by identifying whether a series of breast changes are the result of breast cancer or not. Dependent upon their answers, women are then provided with information educating them on the signs and symptoms of breast cancer and can share their results on social media to further raise awareness of the app and of the issues surrounding the disease.
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Study: Smartphone app that listens to breathing, determines respiratory diseases is 89% accurate

Study: Smartphone app that listens to breathing, determines respiratory diseases is 89% accurate | The mobile health (salud móvil) | Scoop.it
A smartphone-based system for diagnosing respiratory diseases achieved an accuracy of 89 percent in a recent clinical study of 524 pediatric patients conducted by the company at Joondalup Health Campus (JHC) and Princess Margaret Hospital (PMH) in Perth, Western Australia.
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The Mobile Health Paradox: Why Data Isn’t Nearly Enough

The Mobile Health Paradox: Why Data Isn’t Nearly Enough | The mobile health (salud móvil) | Scoop.it

With almost five billion mobile phone users in the world, of which two billion are smartphones, mobile health (also known as m-health or connected health) has been lauded as an attractive solution to address the challenges of the rising costs of chronic morbidities.

 

Moreover, the ubiquity of smartphones has led to a burgeoning market for m-health apps and wearable devices, resulting in more health data being collected than ever before. This has given rise to a phenomenon known as “the quantified self,” the process of tracking everyday activities to learn more about yourself.

 

For example, it is now possible for individuals to know their average time spent in REM sleep over three months and whether their sleep quality correlates with bad weather. One can now check their blood pressure, oxygen saturations and ECG in a single device, receive a fullgenetic analysis for less than $100 and soon be able to keep track of real-time glucose levels thanks to Bluetooth enabled contact lenses.

 

A simple look at Apple’s Health app yields no less than 79 different health records, spanning Vitamins A through E, variations in body temperature and caffeine levels.

 

A new mobile app takes the obsession to quantify into the bedroom, by helping individuals track their sexual encounters on their smartphones. The app collects information on the sexual duration and noise levels in order to quantitatively assess the user’s performance, presenting the data in a series of attractive graphs.

 

http://techcrunch.com/2016/02/10/the-mobile-health-paradox-why-data-isnt-nearly-enough/

 

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Survey: 31 percent of patients use app or device to manage a heart condition

Survey: 31 percent of patients use app or device to manage a heart condition | The mobile health (salud móvil) | Scoop.it
Some 31 percent of heart patients are using digital health tools to manage their condition, according to a HealthMine survey of 501 consumers with known heart disease or heart disease risk. The survey was fielded by Survey Sampling International (SSI) in January and all respondents are enrolled in a health plan.
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State of Mobile Health Apps Security: Perception vs. Reality 

State of Mobile Health Apps Security: Perception vs. Reality  | The mobile health (salud móvil) | Scoop.it

55 percent of consumers expect their mobile health apps to be hacked within the next six months, according to a recent report from Arxan Technologies. Executive IT leaders (48%) who have oversight or insight into the security of the mobile healthcare and produce apps also share the same concerns.


For the report, “State Application Security,” Arxan Technologies surveyed 318 consumers and 80 IT executives with security oversight or insight into mobile health apps in the US, UK, Germany, and Japan. 

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The Best And Worst Rated Health And Fitness Apps For 2016 - ARC

The Best And Worst Rated Health And Fitness Apps For 2016 - ARC | The mobile health (salud móvil) | Scoop.it

ARC from Applause authored this report to help health & fitness brands understand how U.S. customers perceive their flagship Android and iOS app quality. ARC winnowed its initial data pull of nearly 8,000 apps to narrow in on the 65 most popular brands, based on volume of app store feedback (see Figure 2). After crunching approximately 4 million app store reviews, the Applause Health & Fitness App Quality Index is comprised of the brands with more than 10,000 reviews collectively.


http://arc.applause.com/2015/12/30/best-health-and-fitness-apps-2016/


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Cinco maneras en las que las Sociedades Médicas pueden acelerar la adopción de herramientas de Salud Digital

Cinco maneras en las que las Sociedades Médicas pueden acelerar la adopción de herramientas de Salud Digital | The mobile health (salud móvil) | Scoop.it

Ha habido muchos roles establecidos de sociedades médicas profesionales, incluyendo la normalización de la atención (mejores prácticas), la promoción de la salud pública, ymejorar el liderazgo en la medicina.  Todas estas funciones pueden ser equipadas con tecnologías sanitarias digitales. La mayoría de las sociedades profesionales están reconociendo el beneficio para sus miembros de todo tipo de herramientas digitales, incluyendo aplicaciones móviles.

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El reto de ayudar a los pacientes con enfermedad crónica a través de la salud móvil

El reto de ayudar a los pacientes con enfermedad crónica a través de la salud móvil | The mobile health (salud móvil) | Scoop.it

Debido a que estas condiciones son silenciosas y porque la mayoría de las personas prefieren que no se les recuerde que tienen una enfermedad, encontramos que es necesaria una plataforma de compromiso fuerte para llamar la atención de la gente. También encontramos que tenemos que crear herramientas que empujen a la gente a adoptar y mantener un estilo de vida saludable en lugar de ignorar nuestras tendencias naturales de ignorar estas condiciones silenciosas e involucrarse en conductas no saludables.


Con los años, esto me ha llevado a hacer algunas (aparentemente) declaraciones polémicas, tales como, "No podemos dar a la gente lo que quieren." Esta declaración audaz se hizo en el contexto de este enigma de la tendencia a ignorar silencio enfermedad y participar en el estilo de vida poco saludables. Yo también estaba poniendo esto en el contexto de desarrollo de aplicaciones móviles, donde la gente parece confundir el éxito de aplicaciones como WhatsApp y SNAPCHAT con el éxito potencial de aplicaciones móviles de salud. Una vez que un comentarista me llamó a cabo en este sentido. Veo cómo aparece arrogante sacado de ese contexto. El desafío sigue siendo, sin embargo, que con nuestra cultura libertaria en los EE.UU. y la mínima responsabilidad individual, ya sea para los costos de atención médica o de salud preventiva, que necesitamos algún tipo de herramienta para conseguir que la gente participe en los estilos de vida más saludables. Es un imperativo social, si vamos a hacer frente a estas enfermedades crónicas que representan el 70 por ciento de los costos de atención de salud.


leer completo en

http://www.kevinmd.com/blog/2015/06/the-challenge-of-helping-patients-with-chronic-illness-with-mobile-health.html


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mHealth: Tecnología inalámbrica que salva vidas

mHealth: Tecnología inalámbrica que salva vidas | The mobile health (salud móvil) | Scoop.it

Decir que aplicaciones para smartphones hay muchísimas es una obviedad, pero que existan casi 100.000 aplicaciones destinadas a la salud, da que pensar. Una «aplicación móvil» (app) es un programa de software que se ejecuta sobre un dispositivo móvil con tecnología inalámbrica, ya sean teléfonos inteligentes, tabletas, portátiles o cualquier dispositivo electrónico con conectividad sin cables (wearables, smartwatch...). Una «aplicación médica móvil» es una app, que tiene como finalidad realizar una función médica (prevención, diagnóstico, curación, tratamiento o mitigación de una enfermedad, o bien a que afecten a las funciones o morfología del cuerpo). A este subconjunto de apps de la salud y su ecosistema de dispositivos específicos lo denominamos mHealth (Salud Móvil).

Algunas cifras de mHealth que muestran cómo de grande es este mercado:

 

*En EEUU, la monitorización de  pacientes con dispositivos móviles generó en 2010 unos 6.100 millones de dólares. En 2017 está previsto que este mercado alcance los 8.000 millones de dólares. Fuente: Patient Monitoring Devices Market to 2017 - GBI Research.

 

*En Latinoamérica, la salud móvil generará un volumen de negocio de 1.600 millones de dólares con un crecimiento de un 50% anual para los próximos 6 años. Fuente: Fuente: Touching lives through mobile health - GSMA.

 

Más en el Mundo Economía

http://www.elmundo.es/economia/2015/02/20/54e712b022601df4728b4588.html?cid=SMBOSO25301&s_kw=twitter

 

Ignacio Fernández Alberti's insight:

Yo creo que estos datos están ya desactualizados y habría que revisar el informe de marzo de 2012

http://www.gbiresearch.com/report-store/market-reports/medtech/remote-patient-monitoring-devices-market-to-2017-chronic-disease-prevalence-and-government-curbs-on-hospital-spending-to-driv

 

 

Un estudio de la consultora BCC Research publicado en abril 2013

http://www.bccresearch.com/pressroom/hlc/healthcare-information-technology-market-projected-grow-approximately-$26.1-billion-2017

 

 

ya aportaba que el mercado total de las TICs aplicadas a la salud alcanzó los 9.500 millones de dólares en 2011 y casi 11.200 millones de dólares en 2012. Así mismo, el estudio preveía que el mercado crecería hasta los 26.100 millones de dólares en 2017, con una tasa de crecimiento anual del 18,5% durante los próximos cinco años

.

 

En mi opinión, con estas tasas de crecimiento, la monitorización de  pacientes con dispositivos móviles tendrá que estar en cifras muy superiores en 2017

 

 

 

 

 

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Report: How mobile is transforming healthcare

Report: How mobile is transforming healthcare | The mobile health (salud móvil) | Scoop.it

According to a new survey, mobile technology has the potential to profoundly reshape the healthcare industry, altering how care is delivered and received.

 

Key findings include:64% of healthcare executives say mobile health could dramatically improve outcomes by giving people greater access to medical information79% of healthcare professionals say that mobile technologies are providing education and informationIn five years, 50% predict that mobile health will enable patients to participate more proactively in their own careHowever, nearly half (49%) of survey respondents think consumer wariness about privacy violations could be a stumbling block for adoption, while just over half (51%) say data privacy risks are their biggest concern

 

 

infographic and download full report in

http://www.economistinsights.com/analysis/how-mobile-transforming-healthcare

 

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El laboratorio clínico en el móvil | El mundo

El laboratorio clínico en el móvil | El mundo | The mobile health (salud móvil) | Scoop.it

Un pinchazo en el dedo, un móvil, 15 minutos y... diagnóstico hecho. Un grupo de investigadores ha desarrollado un accesorio que, conectado a un smartphone, es capaz de detectar dos enfermedades de transmisión sexual: sífilis y VIH, como si de un laboratorio clínico se tratara. Y, dados los resultados que los autores muestran en su artículo, publicado este miércoles en la revista ScienceTranslational Medicine', puede que llevar el dispositivo de análisis sanguíneo en el bolsillo sea una realidad cercana.

De hecho, no es el único estudio que analiza las posibilidades del teléfono móvil como herramienta sanitaria, pensando especialmente en países con recursos limitados, donde el acceso a los servicios de salud es muy pobre y la existencia de laboratorios es residual. Concretamente, un grupo de científicos del Instituto holandés Royal Tropical describieron en 2011 en la revistaPLoS ONE un sistema con el que a través de la cámara de fotos del móvil y un software específico se podían transferir los datos de la imagen tomada al servidor de un laboratorio que, aunque estuviera localizado lejos, transmitía el diagnóstico con un sencillo mensaje de texto o de voz.

 

En esta ocasión, el director del trabajo, Samuel Sia, y su equipo de ingenieros biomédicos de la Escuela de Salud Pública Mailman (Columbia, EEUU) han diseñado un accesorio de bajo coste (unos 34 dólares) que, unido a un teléfono móvil, hace las veces de una prueba denominada Elisa (que se utiliza de forma estandarizada en el sistema sanitario para la detección precoz del VIH. Como explican los autores, "replica, por primera vez, las funciones mecánicas, ópticas y electrónicas de un análisis de sangre en un laboratorio".

 

En unos 15 minutos, y con unas gotas de sangre (extraídas mediante un pinchazo en el dedo), el dispositivo móvil no sólo detecta los marcadores del VIH, también los de la sífilis, enfermedades muy prevalentes en países en vías de desarrollo. Se trata de una prueba serológica que, al igual que Elisa, permite detectar antígenos mediante el uso de anticuerpos y enzimas. En el dispositivo, relata el estudio, se produce "un acoplamiento de microfluidos con los últimos avances de la electrónica" que se convertirán, a través de un hardware específico, en un diagnóstico que se leerá a través del móvil.

 

 

Leer completo en "El Mundo"

http://www.elmundo.es/salud/2015/02/04/54d269cce2704ef7548b4575.html?cid=SMBOSO25301&s_kw=twitter

 

 

Ignacio Fernández Alberti's insight:

Un ejemplo donde SI hay claras ventajas en la ehealth, es que ya vamos viendo mucha cosa inútil... 

 

o poco práctica....

 

o muy cara para el poco beneficio...

 

o muy compleja...

 

o poco pensada para el usuario (paciente, profesional)

 

...

 

 

 

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MOCAcare Review: Heart Monitor in Your Pocket and Blood Pressure Cuff on Your Wrist - The Medical Futurist

MOCAcare Review: Heart Monitor in Your Pocket and Blood Pressure Cuff on Your Wrist - The Medical Futurist | The mobile health (salud móvil) | Scoop.it
The essence of digital health is making patients the point of care – no matter how unexpected the method. Could you ever imagine that there will be a time when you could measure your heart rate with a device slipped into your key chain holder or your blood pressure on your wrist? MOCAcare does both of that. Moreover, it provides its measurements in good quality and gives meaningful information even for laypeople.
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What ‘mobile’ should mean for healthcare

What ‘mobile’ should mean for healthcare | The mobile health (salud móvil) | Scoop.it
Ask a set of healthcare professionals about the future and they’ll answer: “Mobile.”

Mobile technology is nearing ubiquity in America; a Pew Research report shows 64 percent of all adult Americans own a smartphone, and ownership rates among millennials reach above 80 percent. It’s clear that to stay relevant and access the next generation of patients, the healthcare industry must innovate its mobile efforts.

But after a number of recent discussions with healthcare executives, I’ve noticed the industry is lacking a clear definition of what “mobile” really means. Continue the conversation with the same set of professionals being asked about the future and you might notice some use “apps” and “mobile” interchangeably. Others use it as a term to refer to anything digital. A few might not be able to define it at all.
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4 Critical Success Factors for Hospitals Deploying Mobile Communication

4 Critical Success Factors for Hospitals Deploying Mobile Communication | The mobile health (salud móvil) | Scoop.it
63 percent of hospitals and health systems surveyed have deployed or plan to deploy a mobile communications platform supporting more than 500 smartphones over the next 12 to 18 months, according to study conducted by Spyglass Consulting Group.

The report, “Large-scale Smartphone-based deployments enable hospital-wide communications” identifies the market opportunities and challenges for hospital IT shops to widely deploy a smartphone‐based communications platform to support patient care teams and other mobile hospital workers across the enterprise.

These deployments address the mission- and patient-critical communications required by nurses and other mobile hospital workers across the enterprise.  The average size deployment included 1,100 smartphones while the largest deployment included more than 5,000 smartphones.


Spyglass found that forty-four percent of organizations surveyed had developed comprehensive mobile communications strategies to address the current and future communications and collaboration requirements of nurses, care team members, and other mobile hospital workers. 
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American Optometric Association urges FDA to take action against smartphone eye exam

American Optometric Association urges FDA to take action against smartphone eye exam | The mobile health (salud móvil) | Scoop.it
Smartphone-based eye exams, the province of a growing number of digital health startups, has caught the attention of the American Optometric Association, who penned a letter to the FDA yesterday asking that the agency impose stricter guidance on Opternative, a smartphone-based eye exam startup that raised $6 million earlier this year. Politico first spotted the news.

Opternative is registered with the FDA as a Class 1 device, which do not require pre-market approval. CEO Aaron Dallek told MobiHealthNews in February that the technology is robust and validated.

"We’ve done an independent clinical trial that’s proven that our technology is statistically equivalent [to an office visit] and our satisfaction is over 99 percent with the prescriptions that are dispensed from our service to date. So we are very confident that patients will get a prescription they’re satisifed with using our technology," Dallek said at the time.

The AOA isn't sold. In their 11-page missive, the organization argues that not only is the technology unproven, but it will lead patients to skip eye health exams and endanger their wellbeing.

"The Opternative device relies on unproven technology that has never, to our knowledge, been shown to be safe or effective in accurately determining a lens prescription," AOA President Steven Loomis wrote. "Specifically, the device relies on new, self-administered tests of visual performance to generate a prescription, rather than on assessment by an eye care professional of the underlying eye conditions affecting vision. There are many reasons to doubt the accuracy of prescriptions generated by this approach. Worse yet, use of the device will result in the forgoing of an examination by an eye doctor that is designed to detect a variety of conditions that could affect vision or general health and that require medical treatment."
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Mobile Phone Program Increases Muscle Strength and Reduces Inflammation in COPD Patients

Mobile Phone Program Increases Muscle Strength and Reduces Inflammation in COPD Patients | The mobile health (salud móvil) | Scoop.it

A home-based, individualized endurance exercise training program at an intended walking speed controlled by a pre-set tempo of music with the assistance of a mobile phone significantly improves exercise capacity, strength of limb muscles and a decrease in inflammation markers in patients with Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).In this pilot clinical study conducted byresearchers at a tertiary medical center in Taiwan, it was reported that all 12 patients in the mobile-phone group were still exercising 4 to 6 days per week at the end of the 6 months study, while only 7 of the 14 patients in control group reported regular walking at the end of study.

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mHealth para evitar la transmisión del VIH. Entrevista con Olivia Vélez

mHealth para evitar la transmisión del VIH. Entrevista con Olivia Vélez | The mobile health (salud móvil) | Scoop.it
Olivia se dedica desde hace casi una década a la implementación de programas de salud móvil para prevenir la mortalidad materno infantil. En esta entrevista nos habla de su nuevo reto, implementar un programa para evitar la transmisión del VIH de la madre al bebé en Sudáfrica y también de los beneficios que aporta la salud móvil a los sistemas de salud.

Via ChemaCepeda
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ChemaCepeda's curator insight, January 14, 2016 11:43 AM

La salud móvil está resultando muy eficaz en países en desarrollo, haciendo llegar la información a aquellas personas que lo necesitan  y mejorando su toma de decisiones en salud. Y este es un buen ejemplo de ello

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Apple's Health app will soon help direct users to third party health, wellness apps

Apple's Health app will soon help direct users to third party health, wellness apps | The mobile health (salud móvil) | Scoop.it
Apple has released a preview for the new version of iOS, 9.3, which will feature updates across a number of Apple’s own apps, including Health.
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¿Es posible una Clínica sin papeles?

¿Es posible una Clínica sin papeles? | The mobile health (salud móvil) | Scoop.it

ViDSigner es la solución de firma electrónica manuscrita que se integra con tu software de gestión clínica y que te permitirá gestionar de una forma mucho más eficiente los documentos relevantes que requieren la firma de pacientes y facultativos, como los formularios de alta o los consentimientos informados

 

Tienes una ‪‎clínica‬ médica? 


pues puedes OLVIDARTE DE LOS PAPELES ... visita

www.clínicasinpapeles.com

 


Via ViDSigner
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HelloHeart, app breaks down confusing medical data to help improve your heart health

HelloHeart, app breaks down confusing medical data to help improve your heart health | The mobile health (salud móvil) | Scoop.it

If you have a history of heart disease or are at risk for heart-related issues, then you’re probably already tracking your blood pressure. Instead of jotting down results on a piece of paper, you might want try out Hello Heart for iOS and Android.


Hello Heart provides real-time explanations of what your blood pressure readings mean, and tells you how you’re doing overall. You’ll receive weekly BP reports to see trends and get reminders to check your blood pressure levels or take your pills, so that you can take control of your health.

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Europa se posiciona en materia de mHealth | ConSalud.es

Europa se posiciona en materia de mHealth | ConSalud.es | The mobile health (salud móvil) | Scoop.it

La Comisión Europea está comprometida con la mHealth, sobre todo en materia de seguridad de datos y confianza de los usuarios a nivel de aplicaciones móviles de salud y otras tecnologías como los wearables.

Ahora, publica los resultados de la consulta pública que lanzó en 2014 tras la publicación del “Libro Verde de la mHealth”, que se integra dentro del programa eHealth Action Plan 2012-2020. Varios agentes de este sector sanitario han participado en la consulta. De las 211 respuestas recogidas, casi la mitad apunta que “son necesarias mejores y más fuertes herramientas de privacidad y seguridad (como el encriptado de datos y los mecanismos de autenticación) para construir la confianza de los usuarios”.

 

http://www.consalud.es/seenews.php?id=15752

 

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WHAT IS IMAGINE EXPRESS 2015 ?

WHAT IS IMAGINE EXPRESS 2015 ? | The mobile health (salud móvil) | Scoop.it

Imagine Express is a program aimed to generate businesses in the Mobile sector. Imagine Express will take place during a 4-day trip by train that will travel from Barcelona-Paris-London.

The participants (12 creative minds, 12 software engineers and 12 business students), who will have the challenge to form groups of 3 with the goal of generating apps for one of the 4 strategic sectors selected (health, tourism/culture, social, and open theme).

The ideas will be presented to investors in London and the best team of each sector will receive funding and mentorship to carry out their project successfully.

During the trip back to Barcelona, the winning projects will be set up as a company. On arrival to Barcelona these teams will pitch their project at the Barcelona Mobile World Congress. 

 

http://express.imagine.cc/2015/

 

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In a study 10 percent of diabetes patients actively used app when “prescribed” | mobihealthnews

In a study 10 percent of diabetes patients actively used app when “prescribed” | mobihealthnews | The mobile health (salud móvil) | Scoop.it

A recently-published 8-week study of diabetes patients, published in the Journal of Medical Internet Research, showed that only about 20 percent used an app provided by their clinician with any sort of regularity. Of those, only half were active users.

In the small study, a group of Singaporean researchers recruited 84 patients with type 2 diabetes, many of whom were recently diagnosed. They picked patients who had familiarity with smartphones and could read English, but hadn’t ever used this particular app before.

Patients were instructed in the use of the interactive Diet and Activity Tracker, or iDAT app, which was created by Singapore’s government. The app doesn’t track blood glucose, but does help users track their caloric intake and activity, which it tracks via a built-in GPS step counter. It also helps users set goals and track progress, and to share their progress on Facebook.

 

After eight weeks, the researchers analyzed the usage of the app and found that 76.8 percent of the study participants were “minimal” users, 11.9 percent were “intermittent to waning” users, and 9.5 percent were “consistent” users.

 

http://mobihealthnews.com/40302/in-a-study-10-percent-of-diabetes-patients-actively-used-app-when-prescribed/?__scoop_post=52ccbf20-adea-11e4-e59e-90b11c3d2b20&__scoop_topic=1169649#__scoop_post=52ccbf20-adea-11e4-e59e-90b11c3d2b20&__scoop_topic=1169649

 

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