The Long Poiesis
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The Long Poiesis
Accelerating The MInd of The Future
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Yanis Varoufakis: Marx predicted our present crisis – and points the way out | News | The Guardian

Yanis Varoufakis: Marx predicted our present crisis – and points the way out | News | The Guardian | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
The long read: The Communist Manifesto foresaw the predatory and polarised global capitalism of the 21st century. But Marx and Engels also showed us that we have the power to create a better world.
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The idea of creating a new universe in the lab is no joke | Aeon Ideas

The idea of creating a new universe in the lab is no joke | Aeon Ideas | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Physicists aren’t often reprimanded for using risqué humour in their academic writings, but in 1991 that is exactly what happened to the cosmologist Andrei Linde at Stanford University. He had submitted a draft article entitled ‘Hard Art of th
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AI just took a big step towards becoming more human

AI just took a big step towards becoming more human | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
In recent months, researchers at OpenAI have been focusing on developing artificial intelligence (AI) that learns better.

Their machine learning algorithms are now capable of training themselves, so to speak, thanks to the reinforcement learning methods of their OpenAI Baselines.

Now, a new algorithm lets their AI learn from its own mistakes, almost as human beings do.

The development comes from a new open-source algorithm called Hindsight Experience Replay (HER), which OpenAI researchers released earlier this week.

As its name suggests, HER helps an AI agent "look back" in hindsight, so to speak, as it completes a task. Specifically, the AI reframes failures as successes, according to OpenAI's blog.

"The key insight that HER formalizes is what humans do intuitively: Even though we have not succeeded at a specific goal, we have at least achieved a different one," the researchers wrote.

"So why not just pretend that we wanted to achieve this goal to begin with, instead of the one that we set out to achieve originally?"

Simply put, this means that every failed attempt as an AI works towards a goal counts as another, unintended "virtual" goal.

Think back to when you learned how to ride a bike. On the first couple of tries, you actually failed to balance properly.

Even so, those attempts taught you how to not ride properly, and what to avoid when balancing on a bike. Every failure brought you closer to your goal, because that's how human beings learn.

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DARPA Is Planning to Hack the Human Brain to Let Us "Upload" Skills

DARPA Is Planning to Hack the Human Brain to Let Us "Upload" Skills | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
The DARPA Targeted Neuroplasticity Training (TNT) program is exploring ways to speed up skill acquisition by activating synaptic plasticity.
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The surprising math of cities and corporations

The surprising math of cities and corporations | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Physicist Geoffrey West has found that simple, mathematical laws govern the properties of cities -- that wealth, crime rate, walking speed and many other aspects of a city can be deduced from a single number: the city's population. In this mind-bending talk from TEDGlobal he shows how it works and how similar laws hold for organisms and corporations.
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The Third Wave of AI – Becoming Human

The Third Wave of AI – Becoming Human | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it

Over the decades, combinations of various programming techniques have enabled slow spotty progress in AI — punctuated by occasional breakthroughs such as certain expert, decision and planning systems, and mastering Chess and Jeopardy! These approaches, and in particular those focused on symbolic representations, are generally referred to as GOFAI (Good Old-Fashioned AI). Importantly, a key characteristic that they share is that applications are hand-crafted and custom engineered: Programmers figure out how to solve a particular problem, then turning their insights into code. This essentially represents the ‘First Wave’.


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Spaceweaver's curator insight, October 7, 2017 8:26 AM
Very informative and clear article. Worth reading.
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Psychedelics work by violating our models of self and the world – Philip Gerrans & Chris Letheby | Aeon Essays

Psychedelics work by violating our models of self and the world – Philip Gerrans & Chris Letheby | Aeon Essays | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Psychedelics have a remarkable capacity to violate our ideas about ourselves. Is that why they make people better?
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Is There a Multidimensional Mathematical World Hidden in the Brain’s Computation?

Is There a Multidimensional Mathematical World Hidden in the Brain’s Computation? | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Two thousand years ago, the ancient Greeks looked into the night sky and saw geometric shapes emerge among the stars: a hunter, a lion, a water vase. In a way, they used these constellations to make sense of the random scattering of stars in the fabric of the universe. By translating astronomy into shapes, they …
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The Myth of a Superhuman AI – Backchannel

The Myth of a Superhuman AI – Backchannel | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Debunking the myth of a superhuman artificial intelligence: Hyper-intelligent algorithms are not going to take over the world for these five reasons.
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The Guardian view on immortality: not for the faint-hearted | Editorial

The Guardian view on immortality: not for the faint-hearted | Editorial | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Editorial: The faithful and the futurologists imagine life without death. But living forever may not be all it’s cracked up to be, and then what?
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“Love drugs” will soon be a reality. But should we take them?

“Love drugs” will soon be a reality. But should we take them? | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Love potions have been a plot point in fairytales for centuries. Now, thanks to dramatic advances in our understanding of the neuroscience behind love, they’re close enough to reality to be studied by Oxford University researchers.

Anders Sandberg, a neuroethicist at Oxford University’s Future of Humanity Institute, will discuss the role of romance drugs at an upcoming Institute of Art and Ideas conference “Love in the Time of Tinder”. He says that while we can’t buy romance pills yet, it’s only a matter of years before they exist. His work combines neuroscience and philosophy to unpack the ethical consequences of such pills, and just how they’ll fit into our lives.

“All our emotions are built on the foundations of neuroscience,” Sandberg says—whether that’s fear or anger or love. Recently, neuroscientists have begun to map out just what happens in the brain when we’re in love, bringing us closer to artificially recreating those neurochemical processes. “While there’s still not anything you can find in the supermarket or approved, we’re getting towards the point where they probably will show up,” he says.

Neuroimaging studies of brains show that love is, well, extremely complicated. (No surprises there.) Different subsystems of the brain are involved in that initial lustful attraction, the rush that comes when you fall in love, and then the commitment and affection of long-term partnership. It’s that last, lengthy phase of love that romance drugs are likely to focus on, effectively re-booting the romance for existing couples.

“It’s very different to the love potion in fairytales where you drink it and then fall in love with the next person who comes in,” Sandberg says. “From an ethical standpoint, that’s very worrisome… I would imagine a future love drug would be something you take together with your partner, and that causes a slow, long-term experience.”

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Abstract living 's curator insight, April 19, 2017 8:07 PM
#LoveIsTheDrug #RealLove
 
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Yuval Harari on why humans won’t dominate Earth in 300 years

Yuval Harari on why humans won’t dominate Earth in 300 years | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
"It's not because I overestimate the AI. It's because most people tend to overestimate human beings."

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What Does The Amazon Echo Look Mean For Personal Style?

What Does The Amazon Echo Look Mean For Personal Style? | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Algorithms are deciding how we dress — but it’s always been this way.
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A startup is pitching a mind-uploading service that is “100 percent fatal”

A startup is pitching a mind-uploading service that is “100 percent fatal” | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Nectome will preserve your brain, but you have to be euthanized first.
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Designing Fictional Futures - Monika Bielskyte - CTW 2017 - YouTube


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Alessio Erioli's curator insight, February 26, 5:55 AM

let's move beyond dystopian visions of the future once and for all

"Nostalgia is poison, but so is tecnofetishism"

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Four ethical priorities for neurotechnologies and AI

Four ethical priorities for neurotechnologies and AI | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Artificial intelligence and brain–computer interfaces must respect and preserve people's privacy, identity, agency and equality, say Rafael Yuste, Sara Goering and colleagues.

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The Rise of the Machines – Why Automation is Different this Time

Automation in the Information Age is different. Books we used for this video: The Rise of the Robots: http://amzn.to/2sFQTed The Second Machine Age
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Do We Need a Speedometer for Artificial Intelligence?

Do We Need a Speedometer for Artificial Intelligence? | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Measuring how quickly machines are getting smarter could help us prepare for the consequences for society and the economy.

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A Blueprint for Coexistence with AI | Backchannel

A Blueprint for Coexistence with AI | Backchannel | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
There's no getting around the fact that artificial intelligence will upend our world—but human empathy can't be coded.

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This Machine Could Print Synthetic Life Forms on Demand, And Our Minds Are Reeling

This Machine Could Print Synthetic Life Forms on Demand, And Our Minds Are Reeling | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Back in 2016, biologist Craig Venter achieved something extraordinary. He built a new species of bacteria from scratch in the lab - the simplest genetic life form known to science, made entirely through chemical synthesis of a custom-made genome.

Now, he's unveiled a new machine that could print these synthetic life forms on demand - simply feed in a genome design, and let the 'ink' form the building blocks of life. The invention could see us colonise Mars with synthetic life without ever setting foot on the Red Planet, and Venter and Elon Musk have teamed up to make this happen.

Called 'biological teleportation', the technique could allow scientists to email the genome from Earth to a printer on Mars, theoretically allowing us to colonise the Red Planet from afar.

"I think biological teleportation is what is going to truly enable the colonisation of Mars," Venter told his biographer Ashlee Vance back in 2015.

"Elon and I have been talking about how this might play out."

The new tabletop prototype, called the digital-to-biological converter (DBC), is the first machine that can receive genetic sequences via the internet or radio waves.

That means it can print the four chemical bases of DNA - guanine, thymine, cytosine, and adenine (G, T, C and A) - via remote control to form various biological components.

"Just like a printer, it needs cassettes, but instead of colours, it's bottles of chemicals," Venter told Jordan Pearson at Motherboard.

"It's packaging complex biology that each of our tiny cells do remarkably well at a much, much smaller scale."

Venter has been working on this prototype for years now, but a new study describes how it's finally been able to produce biological compounds such as DNA templates, RNA molecules, proteins, and viral particles without any human intervention.

The printer has also made functional influenza viral particles (H1N1), and bacteriophages that can fight bacterial infections.

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Tensions Flare as Scientists Go Public With Plan to Build Synthetic Human DNA

Tensions Flare as Scientists Go Public With Plan to Build Synthetic Human DNA | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
One of the greatest ethical debates in science - manipulating the fundamental building blocks of life - is set to heat up once more.

According to scientists behind an ambitious and controversial plan to write the human genome from the ground up, synthesising DNA and incorporating it into mammalian and even human cells could be as little as four to five years away.

Nearly 200 leading researchers in genetics and bioengineering are expected to attend a meeting in New York City next week, to discuss the next stages of what is now called the Genome Project-write (GP-write) plan: a US$100 million venture to research, engineer, and test living systems of model organisms, including the human genome.

Framed as a follow-up to the pioneering Human Genome Project (HGP) – which culminated in 2003 after 13 years of research that mapped the human genetic code – this project is billed as the logical next step, where scientists will learn how to cost-effectively synthesise plant, animal, and eventually human DNA.

"HGP allowed us to read the genome, but we still don't completely understand it," GP-write coordinator Nancy J. Kelley told Alex Ossola at CNBC.

While those involved are eager to portray the project as an open, international collaboration designed to further our understandings of genome science, GP-write provoked considerable controversy after its first large meet-up a year ago was conducted virtually in secret, with a select group of invite-only experts holding talks behind closed doors.

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nukem777's curator insight, May 5, 2017 6:33 AM

This is not your grandma's DNA

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Researchers Have Successfully Grown Premature Lambs in an Artificial Womb

Researchers Have Successfully Grown Premature Lambs in an Artificial Womb | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
The technology could be used on humans in 3-5 years.
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The ‘untranslatable’ emotions you never knew you had

The ‘untranslatable’ emotions you never knew you had | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
Learning to identify and cultivate these feelings could give you a richer and more successful life
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Preparing for our posthuman future of artificial intelligence | KurzweilAI

Preparing for our posthuman future of artificial intelligence | KurzweilAI | The Long Poiesis | Scoop.it
(credit: iStock) By David Brin “Each generation imagines itself to be more intelligent than the one that went before it, and wiser than the one that
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