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5 Tips for Talking About Politics on Social Media

5 Tips for Talking About Politics on Social Media | The internet and politics | Scoop.it

With the election right around the corner, follow these tips when mentioning politics on social media.

 

Sometimes when we talk about things we're passionate about, conversations can get heated. One topic to tread carefully with is politics, especially when it comes to social media.

 

The third and final U.S. presidential debate is tonight in Boca Raton, Fla. But before you take to Twitter or Facebook to share your opinions about the candidates and what they say, stop and ask yourself this: Would I say this to a client or business partner? It's easy to forget that what's said over social media is visible to everyone, and can turn out to be embarrassing or even disastrous for your brand.

 

If the leadership at your company feels strongly about publicly supporting a candidate over social media, do so with a simple statement such as, "Acme Rocket Company is proud to support Wiley Coyote for president, we look forward to the future." But, as a general rule, don't socialize personal opinions from a corporate brand unless you are the brand itself. Stick to your personal Twitter or Facebook page for that kind of thing.

 

If you don't think a single post can cause trouble, consider what happened after home appliance company KitchenAid sent an errant tweet about Obama's deceased grandmother during the first debate. The backlash was so severe that KitchenAid's senior director had to take to Twitter herself, apologizing and fielding all of the abuse.

 

If you can't resist the temptation to socialize your thoughts on the debate, and politics in general on your personal social media pages, here are five rules to follow.

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Social Media Can Start a Revolution

Social Media Can Start a Revolution | The internet and politics | Scoop.it

I wholeheartedly embrace social media. The fact that I can post videos on my Twitter of my 4-year-old son talking about how much he loves salami, or as he calls it "meat pancakes", or his mispronunciation of the word for his testicles as "nucksack" is pretty much parental gold. Despite my obvious gross misuse of a fantastic social tool, I do have more respectable uses for social media, and ultimately my own voice.

 


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For Lessons on How to do ePolitics, You've Got to Go Back to the Beginning - Huffington Post UK

For Lessons on How to do ePolitics, You've Got to Go Back to the Beginning - Huffington Post UK | The internet and politics | Scoop.it
For Lessons on How to do ePolitics, You've Got to Go Back to the Beginning Huffington Post UK In August 1999, in its coverage of what was emerging as an important trend in the democratic process, USA Today summed up the kind of argument used by...
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Does Social Media Save or Sour Politics? - Huffington Post Canada

Does Social Media Save or Sour Politics? - Huffington Post Canada | The internet and politics | Scoop.it
Does Social Media Save or Sour Politics?
Huffington Post Canada
Social networks' participatory power and our unfettered access to data is transforming politics -- and democracy itself.
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FDA spending $182,814 to ‘better understand’ social media

FDA spending $182,814 to ‘better understand’ social media | The internet and politics | Scoop.it
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is paying six figures to a group that worked for the Obama for America campaign to monitor its social media platforms so it can be more effective on Facebook and Twitter.
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