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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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FuturistSpeaker.com – A Study of Future Trends and Predictions by Futurist Thomas Frey » Blog Archive » Future Libraries and 17 Forms of Information Replacing Books

FuturistSpeaker.com – A Study of Future Trends and Predictions by Futurist Thomas Frey » Blog Archive » Future Libraries and 17 Forms of Information Replacing Books | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"People who think libraries are going away simply because books are going digital are missing the true tectonic shifts taking place in the world of information.


Libraries are not about books. In fact, they were never about books."

 

"Libraries have always had a mandate to archive the records of their service area, but it has rarely been pursued with more than passing enthusiasm. Archives of city council meetings and local history books made the cut, but few considered the library to be a good photo or video archive.
Over time, many of the newspapers, radio, and television stations will begin to disappear. As these businesses lose their viability, their storerooms of historical broadcast tapes and documents will need to be preserved. More specifically, every radio broadcast, newspaper, and television broadcast will need to be digitized and archived.
With the advent of iCloud and other similar services libraries will want to expand their hosting of original collections, and installing the equipment to digitize the information. The sale of this information to the outside world through an iTunes-like service could become a valuable income stream for libraries in the future.
Final Thoughts
Libraries, much like any living breathing organism, will have to adapt to the complex nature of the ever-changing world of information. As information becomes more sophisticated and complex, so will libraries.
Libraries are here to stay because they have a survival instinct. They have created a mutually dependent relationship with the communities they serve, and most importantly, they know how to adapt to the changing world around them.
I am always impressed with the creative things being done in libraries. As Eleanor Roosevelt once said, “The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.” There are a lot of beautiful dreams taking place that will help form tomorrow’s libraries."
By Futurist Thomas Frey


Via Dennis T OConnor
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Have a look at the future Kirkintilloch library

Have a look at the future Kirkintilloch library | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
THIS is how Kirkintilloch’s popular library will look in three months time.

 

"The library area’s floor space will be reduced and a customer services zone created – including interview and meeting rooms, self-service computers, telephone and enquiry booths, and customer service pods.

The revamped library will feature a new children’s section, a cafe, a study group area and learning suite, free Internet access and a self-service point where users can check books in and out.

A central seating area, staffed desks, self-service payment kiosks and a multi-media display are also part of the plans."


Via Patrick Provencher
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Future U: Library 3.0 has more resources, greater challenges | Ars Technica

Future U: Library 3.0 has more resources, greater challenges | Ars Technica | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by Curt Hopkins:

"Libraries are changing, despite their facades. And they're changing to high-tech service companies with embedded librarians, according to some library professionals."

 

"This transition time is one of great opportunity for those involved in libraries, but all transitions, all borders and verges, are places of great vulnerability as well. Grand changes are possible here, but so are operatic failures. The future seems promising. It’s the present that worries some librarians.

“The myth that the information scholars need for research and teaching is, or soon will be available for free online is a dangerous one,” said Bourg, “especially when it is used as an excuse to cut funding to libraries. Right now libraries face enormous but exciting challenges in maintaining print collections and services where they are still necessary, while simultaneously developing strategies for collecting, preserving, organizing, and providing access to digital objects. I fear that if libraries across the nation don’t get the resources we collectively need to meet these challenges that we may be at risk of losing big chunks of our cultural record because of a lack of funding for digital collecting and preservation."

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Library Boy: Future Trends in Law Libraries

Library Boy: Future Trends in Law Libraries | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Michel-Adrien:

"At a session this morning at the annual conference of the Canadian Association of Law Libraries (CALL) in Toronto, New York-based consultant Nigel Holloway outlined some of the results of a survey conducted earlier this year among CALL members."

 

"Some 140 law librarians responded, about one quarter of the CALL membership, with two fifths of respondents coming from law firms, a bit over one third from from courthouse libraries, and about one sixth from universities. More than 50% of respondents worked in small libraries (1-3 staff), more or less 20% in medium-sized libraries (4-9), and about one quarter in libraries with more than 10 staff members."

[...]

"The survey is quite revealing about the trend toward digital content. Right now, some 45% of respondents state that more than 40% of their content is in digital format. 70% of respondents expect this to be the situation by 2014."

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10 Changes to Expect from the Library of the Future | Online Universities

10 Changes to Expect from the Library of the Future | Online Universities | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Staff Writers:

"In honor of School Library Month, check out the ways libraries are going to blossom in the coming years."

 

"[...] the almost uncanny ability to consistently adapt to the changing demands of the local populace and emerging technology alike. The library system probably won’t disappear anytime soon, but rather, see itself blossoming into something new and exciting in congruence with today’s myriad informational demands."

 

1. More technology

2. Sensory story times

3. Better outreach to ESOL and ESL adults & children

4. Automation

5. Emphasizing community space

6. More social media savvy

7. Digital media labs

8. Electronic outposts

9. Crowdsourcing

10. More active librarians

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Masters of the digital multiverse: can public libraries save the day? > The Conversation

Masters of the digital multiverse: can public libraries save the day? > The Conversation | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
We all know the internet has enabled the creation of digital worlds of multi-layered, interconnected online information.

"But who’s going to protect this information for current and future generations?

Online publishing is moving away from its embryonic phase – consisting mostly of electronic surrogates of paper or print artefacts – towards a new, fully-fledged networked information paradigm.

Traditional information forms such as encyclopedias and journals are morphing into dynamic, interactive digital objects. Most prominent among these is Wikipedia, the Web 2.0 flagship, which provides a mechanism for open, collaborative and dynamic information authoring and sharing, fostering the co-production of knowledge.

We’ve already seen a proliferation of free information services: Google Books, Google Maps, AustLII, and the ABS Database, to name just a few. Portals such as Health InCite open digital doorways to virtual meta-collections of specialised information."

[...]

"There is a place here for the great public library institutions of the world to work in partnership with commercial providers.

By providing trusted, sustainable archiving of dynamic web knowledge and culture, they can continue to fulfil their vital, ongoing societal role as protectors of our information heritage."

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