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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
Curated by Karen du Toit
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People Who Can and Should Influence Change in Libraries #librarians

People Who Can and Should Influence Change in Libraries #librarians | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"As library systems struggle with finding their relevance within the continuously and rapidly changing digital world, there are a number of things which we (library staff) all need to keep in mind.

 

Not only do libraries need to re-invent themselves, we also need to do it while conveying the message externally (in a way that addresses some of the traditional perceptions of libraries the community has come to know – an institution where people still experience barriers to accessing information or having social exchanges)."


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Digital Preservation for Real Archivists in Small Archives, 2011

"It's been a while since I've posted here purely on digital preservation issues: my work has moved in other directions, although I did attend a number of the digital preservation sessions at the Society of American Archivists’ conference...

 

...from a small archives perspective, I think the key development has been the emergence of several digital curation workflow management systems – Archivematica, Curator’s Workbench, the National Archive of Australia’s Digital Preservation Software Platform (others…?) – which package together a number of different tools to guide the archivist through a sequenced set of stages for the processing of digital content.

 

The currently available systems vary in their approaches to preservation, comprehensiveness, and levels of maturity, but represent a major step forward from the situation just a couple of years ago."

 

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School Librarians’ Role in ‘Crap Detection’ Cited — The Digital Shift

School Librarians’ Role in ‘Crap Detection’ Cited — The Digital Shift | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Librarians fostering information literacy: assessing content/"crap detection" http://t.co/iv8QzcxQ...

 

The crisis of information literacy, a familiar issue within the library community, is getting some wider attention.

In this month’s Wired, Clive Thompson cites a recent study that reveals the paucity of search skills among so-called digital natives at both high school and college levels. Importantly he gets to the vital role school librarians play in fostering information literacy, including the critical approach to content, dubbed “crap detection” by Howard Rheingold."


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Karen du Toit's comment, November 9, 2011 7:38 AM
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Axiell presents award to the Digital Cultural Institution of 2011

"Axiell presents award to the Digital Cultural Institution of 2011. The winner, Jönköping School Library Service, Sweden, was chosen for its tremendous success...

 

UK and Scandinavian cultural services and technology expert, Axiell, regularly presents an award to recognise the Digital Cultural Institution of the Year.

This year the award was presented at its prestigious two-day symposium ‘Rethinking Libraries?’, held in London on 2-3 November, for senior managers from archives, museums and libraries across Scandinavia and the UK.

 

The 2011 theme for the award was “going digital to increase value for end users”.

 

"The winner, Jönköping School Library Service, Sweden, was chosen for its tremendous success in enabling students, teachers and parents to work digitally 24/7 through its use of Axiell Arena’s library web portal to develop an online digital knowledge bank and to support learning in innovative ways. In the proposal it was mentioned that the school library service in Jönköping has been a front runner and the first school system to develop its services in such an innovative way." 

 

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100 Extensive University Libraries from Around the World that Anyone Can Access

100 Extensive University Libraries from Around the World that Anyone Can Access | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Universities house an enormous amount of information and their libraries are often the center of it all. You don't have to be affiliated with any university to take advantage of some of what they h...

 

"From digital archives, to religious studies, to national libraries, these university libraries from around the world have plenty of information for you. There are many resources for designers as well. Although this is mainly a blog that caters to designers and artists I have decided to include many other libraries for all to enjoy.

 

- Digital libraries

- International Digital libraries

- Books & texts

- Medical libraries

- Legal libraries

- National Libraries of Europe

- World Religion libraries

- Specialized Collections

- Academic Research

- American Universities

- International Universities

 

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Helen Lynch's curator insight, September 22, 2013 4:50 AM

Very useful list...

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Saving libraries but not librarians [Blowback]

Saving libraries but not librarians [Blowback] | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Dan Terzian, a fellow at the legal clinic New Media Rights and a lecturer at the Peking University School of Transnational Law, responds to The Times' Oct. 26 Op-Ed article, "Libraries can't run themselves," on saving librarians' jobs.

 

The digital revolution, while improving society, has gutted many professions.

 

 Machines have replaced assembly-line workers, ATMs have replaced bank tellers, Amazon has replaced bookstores and IBM's Watson may even replace doctors and lawyers. And now, the Internet is replacing librarians.

Or at least it should be.

 

The digital revolution has made many librarians obsolete. Historically, librarians exclusively provided many services: They organized information, guided others' research and advised community members. But now, librarians compete with the Internet and Google. Unlike libraries, the Internet's information is not bound by walls; from blogs and books to journals and laws, the Internet has them all. And Google makes this information easily accessible to anyone with an Internet connection."

 

 

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Libraries and Their Role in the Digital Economy

Libraries and Their Role in the Digital Economy | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Libraries and Their Role in the Digital Economy - Public Libraries Australia Chair, Ross Duncan recently...

This presentation raised both the profile and relevance of public libraries to Australia’s economic development, especially in the context of the NBN rollout. A PDF copy of the PowerPoint presentation isavailable from the home page of the Public Libraries Australia website (www.pla.org.au)

 

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Digital Media Collections: Archivists Need To “Take Control” Back From IT — Digital Asset Management News

RT @DAMNEWS: Digital Media Collections: Archivists Need To "Take Control" Back From IT - http://t.co/gnbqsSaJ...

"Joshua Ranger writing on the AudioVisual Preservation Solutions blog discusses how “Digital Media Collections Are an IT Problem But Not an IT Solution”.

The essence of Joshua’s post is that while archivists must collaborate with IT professionals to enable digital collections to be established, it is the archivists who should have primary control over core elements such as the development of metadata models and choice of formats based on the long-term preservation objectives of the organisation."

 

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A Bibliographic Framework for the Digital Age (October 31, 2011): Bibliographic Framework Transition Initiative (Library of Congress)

"The Working Group of the Future of Bibliographic Control, as it examined technology for the future, wrote that the Library community’s data carrier, MARC, is “based on forty-year-old techniques for data management and is out of step with programming styles of today.” [1] The Working Group called for a format that will “accommodate and distinguish expert-, automated-, and self-generated metadata, including annotations (reviews, comments, and usage data.”

 

"Recognizing that Z39.2/MARC are no longer fit for the purpose, work with the library and other interested communities to specify and implement a carrier for bibliographic information that is capable of representing the full range of data of interest to libraries, and of facilitating the exchange of such data both within the library community and with related communities.”

 

http://www.loc.gov/marc/transition/news/framework-103111.html

 

 

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Keeping Up with Technology - Resources for Library Staff

Keeping Up with Technology - Resources for Library Staff | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Keeping Up with Technology - Resources for Library Staff: http://t.co/3cpuLkZE...

 

"On March 14, 2007, Jim Duncan and Sharon Morris of the Colorado State Library presented a workshop at the CLiC spring workshops on the subject of keeping up with technology. The following resources were used in the workshop and available for library staff development and general use.

 

Lists compiled:

General Libraries Resources

Non-Library Technology Resources

Librarian Blogs

Library and Technology Podcasts

Library Organizations and Online Publications

Library Listservs

Online Courses and Webinars"

 

 

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