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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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The rise of e-reading - Pew Internet Research

The rise of e-reading - Pew Internet Research | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
21% of Americans have read an e-book. The increasing availability of e-content is prompting some to read more than in the past and to prefer buying books to borrowing them.
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The Future of Libraries : Beyond Search, by Cynthia Murrell

Cynthia Murrell:

"News and Information from ArnoldIT.com about Search and Content Processing" (New blog post: The Future of Libraries http://t.co/T41wMdxQ...)...

 

"The Republic perceives the inevitable winds and encourages us to adjust our sails in “The Bookless Library.” No matter how much some of us would like to believe otherwise, the traditional library with its stacks upon stacks of wood pulp tomes is on its way out. In a lengthy article that is worth a read, journalist David A. Bell suggests we proactively manage the shift in a way that will best benefit society.
This paragraph was particularly poignant to me:
“Specialized scholars will always have reasons to consult the original paper copies of books. Marginalia, watermarks, paper quality, binding, and many other features of the physical book that digitization cannot always capture offer valuable clues about how the books were produced, circulated, and read, how they created meaning. But this sort of research . . . involves a small number of readers. Far more readers, of course, appreciate physical books for their aesthetic qualities: the feel of the paper, the crisp look of print on the page, the elegant binding, the pleasant heft of the volume in the hand, the sense of history embedded in a venerable edition that has gone through many owners. But this sort of pleasure, real and meaningful as it is, is harder to justify financially, as resources grow increasingly scarce.”

 

Read the article by David A. Bell here: http://www.tnr.com/article/books-and-arts/magazine/david-bell-future-bookless-library

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E-books in Libraries: A Briefing Document developed in preparation for a Workshop on E-Lending in Libraries | Berkman Center

By David O'Brien:

"Beginning with a brief overview of the history and the current state of the e-book publishing market, the document traces the structure of the licensing practices and business models used by distributors to make e-books available in libraries, and identifies select challenges facing libraries and publishers. Where possible, we have made an effort to incorporate stakeholder perspectives and real-world examples to connect analysis to the actual questions, issues, and challenges that arise in practice. The document concludes with a number of informative resources – including news articles, whitepapers, stakeholder and trade association reports, and other online sources – that might inform future conversations, investigations, pilot projects, and best practices in this space."

 

Paper here: http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2111396

 

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E-Books: What a Librarian Wants - PageView - The Chronicle of Higher Education

E-Books: What a Librarian Wants - PageView - The Chronicle of Higher Education | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Jennifer Howard:

 

James R. Mouw  (University of Chicago Library):

First, if there are going to be print and digital versions, they should be available at the same time, so the library can decide which best suits its needs.

Second, digital monographs need to be made available in a way that allows the library to pick and choose and not make duplicate purchases.

Third, the Chicago library strongly prefers to buy digital content that’s guaranteed be permanently accessible, “so we essentially own it,” Mouw said.

 

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Ebook Strategy and Public Libraries: Slow Just Won’t Work Anymore — The Digital Shift

Ebook Strategy and Public Libraries: Slow Just Won’t Work Anymore — The Digital Shift | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Pat Losinski

 

 

"OK, it’s time for a little tough love for public library leaders. We haven’t been as visionary, vigilant and assertive as we need to be when it comes to mapping our future in the ebook world. And unfortunately, too much of our time has been spent reacting to business models that seemingly reflect only commercial interests, rather than boldly advocating for business models that also serve the public’s interests.

Our primary role is to champion the rights of access for our users. Our ebook strategy needs a serious overhaul, and it needs to happen right now. Unless we move quickly, the technology divide that we’ve all been battling the last 20 years will look like a minor skirmish compared to the content divide that is mounting."

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EXTRA ETHER: eBooks Gone in 5 Years? | Hugh McGuire

EXTRA ETHER: eBooks Gone in 5 Years? | Hugh McGuire | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

by Porter Anderson:

The distinction between “the Internet” and “books” is arbitrary, and will disappear in 5 years. Start adjusting now"


Via Trudy Raymakers
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FuturistSpeaker.com – A Study of Future Trends and Predictions by Futurist Thomas Frey » Blog Archive » Future Libraries and 17 Forms of Information Replacing Books

FuturistSpeaker.com – A Study of Future Trends and Predictions by Futurist Thomas Frey » Blog Archive » Future Libraries and 17 Forms of Information Replacing Books | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Futurist Thomas Frey:

"Libraries are not about books. In fact, they were never about books.
Libraries exist to give us access to information. Until recently, books were one of the more efficient forms of transferring information from one person to another. Today there are 17 basic forms of information that are taking the place of books, and in the future there will be many more…"

 

"Here is a list of 17 primary categories of information that people turn to on a daily basis. While they are not direct replacements for physical books, they all have a way of eroding our reliance on them. There may be more that I’ve missed, but as you think through the following media channels, you’ll begin to understand how libraries of the future will need to function:
Games 
Digital Books 
Audio Books 
Magazines 
Music 
Photos 
Videos 
Television 
Movies
Radio 
Blogs 
Podcasts 
Apps 
Presentations 
Courseware 
Personal Networks 
Each of these forms of information has a place in future libraries. Whether or not physical books decline or even disappear has little relevance in the overall scheme of future library operations."


Via Dennis T OConnor
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Digital Public Library of America faces uncertainty over functions, by Chris Meadows

Digital Public Library of America faces uncertainty over functions, by Chris Meadows | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

By Chris Meadows

"On MIT’s Technology Review, Nicholas Carr takes an in-depth look at the creation of the Digital Public Library of America, an attempt at a non-commercial universal electronic library (which I also mentioned last month) that hopes to provide universal access to as much of human knowledge as it can. Carr first looks at Google’s attempt to create Google Book Search, and the negotiated settlement that was thrown out as too overreaching. Though Google is moving ahead with its legal defense, the search market has shifted toward social networking meaning that a book search might not be as attractive to Google as it once was."

 

"But the biggest problem facing the DPLA may be the same one facing Google Books: the question of copyright. While the DPLA’s nonprofit status does open some doors to it that remain shut to Google Books (such as possibly working out the kind of licensing agreements with publishers that have given the commercial Google such trouble), it doesn’t give it carte blanche to offer works that are still under copyright. Having a truly comprehensive digital library could require Congress to pass new laws."

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2012 top ten trends in academic libraries

A review of the trends and issues affecting academic libraries in higher education ACRL Research Planning and Review Committee

"Three leaders in academic librarianship were the catalysts for this discussion: Martin Halbert, dean of libraries at University of North Texas; Joan Lippincott, associate director of Coalition for Networked Information (CNI), and Mark Puente, director of diversity and leadership programs, Association of Research Libraries (ARL). This discussion forum augmented the trends identified by the committee.

These top trends are listed alphabetically. Each trend includes a brief discussion and references to the literature. The committee also compiled additional resources that may be of interest."

 

- "Communication value

- Data curation

- Digital preservation

- Higher education

- Information technology

- Mobile environments

- Patron driven e-book acquisition

- Scholarly communication

- Staffing

- User behaviours and expectations"

 

The committee would like to thank Erin Hood, research assistant at OCLC Research, for her assistance in producing this document."

 

   
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eBook Options for Libraries (draft)

An investigation into viable ways for libraries to offer ebooks (Summary of current eBook options for libraries — http://t.co/EnGBiQ0Q...)...

 

"Viable ebook options either provide libraries with ownership privileges or are free of digital rights management (DRM) software, ideally both. DRM is an inherently flawed technology that can be replaced either by creating better software or, more likely, by developing models that enable libraries to acquire ebooks and authors, editors, and others involved in publishing to get paid for their work. This is a draft and an outline. The material on this page will soon be published as a narrative."

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Oregon's wired libraries are a digital delight

Oregon's wired libraries are a digital delight | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
If you still think of libraries as a place only for books of the paper kind, think again. Libraries nationwide -- including those in the metro area and beyond -- are going digital with downloadable resources, from e-books to online language programs.

 

"Since Multnomah County began offering downloadable books and videos in 2010, use of the service has skyrocketed, said Jeremy Graybill, a spokesman for the county library system. Ten months into the fiscal year, checkouts have already more than doubled last year's numbers, with more than 189,000 checkouts of electronic titles. Similar trends are seen in Clackamas and Washington counties.

To meet the increasing demand, libraries throughout the metro area are increasing their collections of downloadable books, audio and video. But navigating the ever-expanding options can be overwhelming. Library visitors so regularly request help with their e-readers, tablet computers and smartphones that Flotten has launched a weekly hourlong session to answer their questions."

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Florida libraries adopt QR codes to offer free music and books - QR Code Press

Florida libraries adopt QR codes to offer free music and books - QR Code Press | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Broward County Library FL using QR codes to promote  and access OverDrive and Freegal Music

-- spotted by @johnfoleyjr 

 

 Written by John Montgallo

"QR codes may help drive traffic to local libraries:

County officials believe that this initiative will be successful and help consumers grow more attached to local libraries. The services will be available at all hours of the day, even when libraries are closed. Those using the OverDrive application will be able to download books and music while at home instead of having to make a trip to local libraries. These consumers will still have the opportunity to find and scan QR codes as a way to gain access to digital content.

Broward County is not alone in its adoption of QR codes. Palm Beach County has also begun offering downloadable e-books via QR codes. The county does not have any intention of joining the Freegal Music Service at this time, however."


Via Doug Mirams
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