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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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Librarians in the Digital Age | American Libraries Magazine

Librarians in the Digital Age | American Libraries Magazine | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
ALA President Sari Feldman and President-Elect Julie Todaro respond to a recent Wall Street Journal editorial about librarians in the age of Google.
"Nothing could be further from the truth than the outdated stereotype of libraries and librarians that Steve Barker presents in his January 11 article. In Boston at our national conference this past week, we heard repeatedly from colleagues among the thousands gathered that this might be the most exciting time of opportunity in libraries and for librarians. Attendees included librarians of all ages and demographics, librarians who—whether in school, public, academic, or special library settings—take pride in playing an integral role in the educational, cultural, and information experiences of their patrons. Examples? Consider Multnomah County Library’s Lyndsey Runyan, a librarian who specializes in rethinking how to use existing space in public libraries for 21st-century learning and creation. She’s overseeing a new facility near Portland, Oregon, for underserved teenagers to build science, technology, engineering, arts, and math skills by making electronic music, building robots, utilizing 3-D printers, and more. How about Kristina Holzweiss, Bay Shore Middle School librarian, who developed “GENIUS Hour,” a teamwork-based program in which students create original presentations while exploring their own passions from robotics to coding? Or George Washington University Gelman Librarian Bill Gillis who co-teaches a required freshmen writing class where students learn to use research and sources to expand their horizons and strengthen their writing? Rather than being pushed aside by the information revolution, our public libraries alone continue to host more than 1.5 billion visits annually—or about 4 million per day. Our school and academic libraries are destinations for millions of students daily for research and information literacy assistance from expert librarians. In fact, recent findings from the Pew Research Center reveal that librarian assistance is the most important library service we provide, after free access to books and media (just ahead of free access to computers and the internet)."
Karen du Toit's insight:
Future of librarians very exciting!
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The top technologies every librarian needs to know - ed. Kenneth Varnum / @facetpublishing

The top technologies every librarian needs to know - ed. Kenneth Varnum / @facetpublishing | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
The Top Technologies Every Librarian Needs to Know: titles from @facetpublishing http://t.co/PJLGk8JSNB

 

Edited by Kenneth J Varnum

In this much needed book, Kenneth Varnum and his hand-picked team of contributors look ahead over the most important technologies likely to impact library services over the next five years. It shows librarians where to invest time and money to receive the greatest benefits. Their ideas will stimulate strategic thinking and help library staff make informed decisions about meeting user expectations and delivering services.

Highly informative for any library, the diverse chapters include: 

Impetus to Innovate: Convergence and Library Trends Hands-Free Augmented RealityImpacting the Library FutureLibraries and Archives Augmenting the WorldThe Future of Cloud-Based Library SystemsLibrary DiscoveryWeb Services as the New Websites for Many LibrariesText Mining Bigger, Better, Together: Building the Digital Library of the FutureOpen Hardware in Libraries.

This leading edge collection offers an expert-level view of library technology that’s just around the corner and is essential reading for systems librarians, students and all librarians who are looking to the technology future.

July 2014; 144pp; paperback; 978-1-78330-033-4; £49.95

 

Find out more: http://www.facetpublishing.co.uk/title.php?id=0334&utm_source=Communicator_facet_mailing_list&utm_medium=Email&utm_content=Varnum2&utm_campaign=The+top+technologies+every+librarian+needs+to+know&_ccCt=GqCK7eRmX931soBq1T0BNg_hUSnDuKhXE76qaN2plZUIBOeDaCj9bEVRsmNE3ff9

 

Karen du Toit's insight:

Future of libraries!

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The Future of Libraries - 7 questions librarians need to answer - Lee Rainie (Slideshare)

"Lee Rainie, Director of the Pew Research Center Internet Project, runs through the seven questions libraries need to address as they consider future services and their role for their patrons and communities. He describes how project research about the changing role of technology in people’s lives affects the kinds of issues librarians need to address as they experience the disruptions of technology change."

[...]

1.  What’s the future of knowledge? 2.  What’s the future of pathways to knowledge (reference expertise)? 3.  What’s the future of public technology and community anchor institutions? 4.  What’s the future of learning “spaces”? 5.  What’s the future of attention (and its structural holes)? 6.  What’s the franchise?7: Where do you fit on the dashboard?"

 

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great questions to answer for the profession.

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Marylène Goulet's comment, April 20, 2014 8:32 PM
Slide no. 29
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Edge helps libraries evaluate and improve technology services

Edge helps libraries evaluate and improve technology services | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"Edge helps libraries evaluate and improve technology services.'


"The Edge Initiative is a voluntary, assessment program that provides libraries with benchmarks, best practices, tools and resources that support continuous improvement and reinvestment in public technology services. Edge helps libraries connect their services to community priorities."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Great initiative to stay relevant in the community!

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I AM A {SOCIAL} LIBRARIAN infographic - Free download!

I AM A {SOCIAL} LIBRARIAN infographic - Free download! | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
Download, embed and share The Social Librarian infographic. The social librarian is enmeshed in the fabric of the Internet of Things as curator, educator, filter and beacon.

 

"Social today means so much more than sending a tweet or posting to Facebook. The social librarian is enmeshed in the fabric of the Internet of Things as curator, educator, filter and beacon. In this complex, dynamic and demanding environment, librarians are extending themselves and empowering library users.

In recognition of this, Elsevier's Library Connect Newsletter (@library_connect) and Joe Murphy (@libraryfuture), Librarian & Technology Analyst/Trend Spotter, offer up a visual portrait of The Social Librarian, and invite you to download and post, share on your social streams, and discuss with your library stakeholders.

- See more at: http://libraryconnect.elsevier.com/articles/supporting-users-organizations/2013-08/i-am-social-librarian-infographic-free-download#sthash.fk55XRbU.dpuf

 

Karen du Toit's insight:

The Social Librarian = Future Librarian!

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nickcarman's curator insight, August 29, 2013 11:37 PM

A great infographic which shows the skills and attributes a modern librarian ought to encompass.

Lisa Oldham's curator insight, August 30, 2013 12:40 PM

Important thinking for the future of sustainable libraries

Gai Dennett's curator insight, September 26, 2013 7:45 PM

New age Teacher Librarian roles outlined here

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School Librarians: Collaborate to lead - Doug Johnson's Blue Skunk Blog

School Librarians: Collaborate to lead - Doug Johnson's Blue Skunk Blog | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
While collaboration with individual teachers is important to a successful library program, collaboration with school leaders and membership on school leadership teams is critical - and too few building librarians recognize this.

[...]

Librarians, you can and should be serving on at least one, if not more, of these teams (in addition to meeting regularly with your building principal):

Building/site leadership teamCurriculum teamsAssessment committeesStrategic planning initiativesTechnology advisory committeesNew facility planning task forcesParent-teacher organizationAccreditation/program review teams"
Karen du Toit's insight:

Good suggestions for all librarians!

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