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Librarians and Archivists in a fast-changing digital lanscape
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AMIA Online - 3 webinars about preservation of audiovisual heritage

AMIA is a nonprofit, international association dedicated to the preservation and use of moving image media. As the world’s largest association of professional media archivists, AMIA brings together a broad range of experts and institutions in a single forum to address the best ways to preserve our media heritage.

  AN INTRODUCTION TO DIGITAL FORMATS 
AND STORAGE

This series focuses on digital file formats, storage, and transfer workflows. [Eight webinars]

  BEST PRACTICES FOR 
PERSONAL AUDIOVISUAL ARCHIVES

This series is directed to families and individuals with audiovisual collections they wish to preserve. [Two webinars]

  BEST PRACTICES FOR 
SMALL AUDIOVISUAL ARCHIVES

This series is directed to small institutions with audiovisual collections and limited staff. [Two webinars]


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Looks good, but unfortunately at a prize!

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Online Video Presentation: NEH and the Preservation and Access of Audiovisual Cultural HeritageNEH and the Preservation and Access of Audiovisual Cultural Heritage | National Endowment for the Huma...

Online Video Presentation: NEH and the Preservation and Access of Audiovisual Cultural HeritageNEH and the Preservation and Access of Audiovisual Cultural Heritage | National Endowment for the Huma... | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"The U.S. National Endowment for the Humanities is proud to present “NEH and the Preservation and Access of Audiovisual Cultural Heritage,” an online video by Program Officers Joshua Sternfeld and Jesse Johnston: http://www.neh.gov/divisions/preservation/featured-project/neh-and-the-preservation-and-access-audiovisual-cultural-her. ;

The three-part video—which you may watch in full or in separate parts (links below)--covers NEH’s ongoing commitment to preserve audiovisual cultural heritage.  Part I provides an argument for the significance of a/v collections as an essential media for understanding the history of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.  Part II summarizes the full range of grant programming for a/v collections provided by NEH’s Division of Preservation and Access that covers areas in research and development, education and training, assessment for smaller institutions, reformatting, cataloging, and stabilization through sustainable preventive conservation.  Finally, Part III describes NEH’s strategic planning to address the current crisis in a/v preservation and access.

We invite you to share the video or its constituent parts widely not just with fellow audiovisual archivists, librarians, and engineers, but administrators, scholars, and anyone else who may be interested to learn more about moving image and sound collections. 

We also invite your feedback on how NEH may continue to support the field going forward.  Your participation, expressed in grant proposals and correspondence, are what fuel our programming and outreach.

As always, program officers are available to discuss project ideas, read drafts for many of our grant programs, and provide feedback.  Questions may be submitted to Josh Sternfeld (jsternfeld@neh.gov) or Jesse Johnston (jjohnston@neh.gov).  You may learn more about our grant programming at http://www.neh.gov/divisions/preservation. ; You can also follow us on Twitter, @NEH_PresAccess for future news and announcements on this fast-moving front.

 

NEH is an independent grant-making agency of the United States government dedicated to supporting research, education, preservation, and public programs in the humanities.

 

FULL VIDEO: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IFTk6OLctVI&feature=player_embedded

 

PART I: The Significance of Audiovisual Cultural Heritage: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0TjWQFOcaGo&feature=player_embedded

 

PART II: NEH Division of Preservation and Access Grant Programming and Audiovisual Collections: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ugcaJpcAktg&feature=player_embedded

 

PART III: NEH Strategic Planning and the Crisis of Audiovisual Preservation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IyfXXfgxEQY&feature=player_embedded

rn more about moving image and sound collections. 

 

 

We also invite your feedback on how NEH may continue to support the field going forward.  Your participation, expressed in grant proposals and correspondence, are what fuel our programming and outreach.

 

As always, program officers are available to discuss project ideas, read drafts for many of our grant programs, and provide feedback.  Questions may be submitted to Josh Sternfeld (jsternfeld@neh.gov) or Jesse Johnston (jjohnston@neh.gov).  You may learn more about our grant programming at http://www.neh.gov/divisions/preservation. ; You can also follow us on Twitter, @NEH_PresAccess for future news and announcements on this fast-moving front.

 

Karen du Toit's insight:

To be shared widely, and encourage feedback as well!

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More Podcast, Less Process: The Video word made flesh - Jefferson Bailey & Joshua Ranger (Podcast)

More Podcast, Less Process: The Video word made flesh - Jefferson Bailey & Joshua Ranger (Podcast) | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

"More Podcast, Less Process is a podcast featuring interviews with archivists, librarians, preservationists, technologists, and information professionals about interesting work and projects within and involving archives, special collections, and cultural heritage. Topics include appraisal and acquisition, arrangement and description, reference, outreach and education, collection management, physical and digital preservation, and infrastructure and technology.

Hosts: Jefferson Bailey, Metropolitan New York Library Council & Joshua Ranger, AudioVisual Preservation Solutions.

Episodes are available here and through Internet Archive, SoundCloud, iTunes, and direct download. You can also follow via the RSS feed. All episodes are released CC BY-NC-SA 3.0 US. For more information, email Jefferson at jbailey at metro dot org."

Karen du Toit's insight:

Interview with archivists about video archiving.

Check series of podcasts (7 before this one) here: http://keepingcollections.org/more-podcast-less-process/

 

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DIVArchive speeds content retrieval for The Netherlands Institute - Broadcast Engineering

DIVArchive speeds content retrieval for The Netherlands Institute - Broadcast Engineering | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

 

"The Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision (NIBG) is using DIVArchive to archive A/V content that has been broadcast or scanned.

Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision (NIBG) has installed DIVArchive to manage its broadcast and film files; manages 10 PB of DPX files and 6 PB of broadcast files.

The project includes the move all of its assets that are now archived at Ericsson (formerly Technicolor) into its new in-house digital archive."

 

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Opening Up the Archives: Part 2- Keeping Ahead of Obsolescence / BBC - video

Opening Up the Archives: Part 2- Keeping Ahead of Obsolescence / BBC - video | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Ant Miller (BBC Research and Development Blog):

"In this second part of the Archive Research film we take a look at the key challenges addressed by the 'preservation' work of R&D and the BBC Information & Archives teams.  With interviews from Dr Richard Wright, Adrian Williams of I&A and others, Alex Mansfield gets to the bottom of the latest technologies being used to ensure that the critical challenge of obsolescence is handled, and handled effectively and efficiency.

With huge files, and critical quality checks essential to preserving the legacy of the archive, the best efforts of engineers and archivists are being applied to saving this content for the future."

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Film vs. Digital: Archivists Speak Out - Smithsonian (blog), by @Film_Legacy

Film vs. Digital: Archivists Speak Out - Smithsonian (blog), by @Film_Legacy | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Smithsonian (blog): Film vs. Digital: Archivists Speak Out

[...] 

"Skip Elsheimer, a media archeologist with A/V Geeks, believes that access to materials is key. “Access is the first step toward preservation,” he said. “When films are online, people can access them and identify areas for research. You can say, ‘You know what? That title’s important because it was made by a special company, or it’s the first time a musician scored something, or it’s an early appearance by an actor.’”

Digital answers some of these access issues, but also raises other questions. “Videotape is going away,” Elsheimer pointed out. “The crushing blow was the tsunamis in Japan last year that hit the Sony tape manufacturing plants. A lot of people changed over to file-based formats at that point.”

But what format do you use? “When YouTube came out, it was a pretty big deal,” Elsheimer said. “We’re still talking to archives who want a YouTube channel, so that’s what the bar is. And that bar’s not very high. But a lot of people just want to see something, even if they’re seeing it in the worst possible quality.”

Elsheimer believes how we watch movies determines the delivery format. “With High Definition, video has gotten bigger, but people are watching it smaller—on iPhones and iPads,” he said. “What’s changing now is the software for reading video files. Final Cut was a big thing for a while, but we’re shifting to another format. Are QuickTime files going to be valuable anymore? Probably not.”

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The television archive:'We do have some old tapes, but not many' - Irish Times

The television archive:'We do have some old tapes, but not many' - Irish Times | The Information Professional | Scoop.it

Irish Times: The television archive:'We do have some old tapes, but not many'

 

THIRTY MEMBERS of staff work specifically in the television library and archives at RTÉ.

"Nowadays, the approach to archiving is very different, and RTÉ is continually looking at ways to present its archives to the public.

There is a selection of material on its website, arranged both by themes and chronology: see rte.ie/laweb.

Throughout 2012 the station will be releasing selected archive programmes to Real Player."

 

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Special Site for 2011 World Day for Audio-Visual Heritage

Special Site for 2011 World Day for Audio-Visual Heritage | The Information Professional | Scoop.it
World Heritage Audio Visual Day, AV Day, Heritage...

 

"The theme for this year's celebration of the World Day for Audiovisual Heritage 2011 is "Audivisual Heritage: See, Hear, and Learn."

 

Sound recordings and moving images are extremely vulnerable as they can be quickly and deliberately destroyed. Essentially emblematic of the 20th century, audiovisual heritage can be irretrievably lost as a result of neglect, natural decay and technological obsolescence. Public consciousness of the importance of preservation of these recordings must be engaged and the World Day for Audiovisual Heritage is intended to be the platform for building global awareness."

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