The Heavy
802 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Red Light Management
Scoop.it!

The Heavy's Single 'How You Like Me Now?' Certified Gold Band's Latest Album ... - Contactmusic.com

The Heavy's Single 'How You Like Me Now?' Certified Gold Band's Latest Album ... - Contactmusic.com | The Heavy | Scoop.it

Renegade UK soul-rockers The Heavy are proud to announce that their hit single "How You Like Me Now?" has been awarded an RIAA Gold Digital Single Award for its combined sales of 500,000 downloads and more. The song is taken from the band's sophomore album, The House That Dirt Built, which was released in 2009. As one of the band's live favorites, "How You Like Me Now?" has gone on to be featured in countless advertisements, television shows, video games, and films since its release and is continuing to gain even more recognition. The Heavy recently released the follow-up to The House That Dirt Built titled The Glorious Dead, their third full-length LP that was released by Counter Records in August of 2012. Self-produced and with their unique, raw eclecticism fully intact,The Glorious Dead is the band's most fully-realized record yet, mixing together soul, hip-hop, rock, blues and funk into glorious, raucous party music that is equally full of heart.

The first single from The Glorious Dead, "What Makes A Good Man?," was snatched up by Miller Beer for a national ad campaign (featuring the band in a dressing room cameo), was recently used as part of the 2013 NFL Draft presentation alongside a collaboration with 50 Cent, and was performed on a number of American late-night television shows including The Late Show With David Letterman,The Late Late Show With Craig Ferguson and Last Call With Carson Daly. From the horror film atmospherics of "Can't Play Dead" and the laid-back sincerity of "Curse Me Good" to the funked-up hip hop rhythm of "Big Bad Wolf" and the epic, heavy-hitting gospel rock 'n' roll of "Same 'Ol," The Glorious Dead finds the band exploring new creative territory on their new offering with impressive results. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Red Light Management
Scoop.it!

The Heavy - ‘Hurt And The Merciless’ (Counter Records) | 21st April 2016

The Heavy - ‘Hurt And The Merciless’ (Counter Records) | 21st April 2016 | The Heavy | Scoop.it
I have a bit of a confession to make, I am a big fan of The Heavy, having followed them from their early days. But for a lot of you you are probably still wondering “Who are The Heavy?” Think you’ve never heard them? Think again? Lots of their tracks have appeared across numerous games and consoles adverts, the tracks have appeared on any number of film soundtracks and TV series, in fact they must be a dream for any marketing director looking to soundtrack his latest brand strategy. Taking it all the way to the top, one of their tracks, ‘How You Like Me Now?’ was played in Chicago on Obama’s election night, just after the Ohio vote was cast, the Ohio vote sealed the process for his victory! Looking a little deeper ‘How You Like Me Now?’ is also featured in episodes of several television series: the twentieth episode of the fourth season of the Vampire Diaries, the sixth season finale of Entourage, the fourth episode of Community, the third episode of Rookie Blue; and the second season summer finale of White Collar. The song is also featured throughout the 2010 feature film The Fighter. So knowing all that have you ever picked up an LP by The Heavy? You should have, because these guys should be huge! If you haven’t I would suggest you dive in and start with this their fourth release ‘Hurt And The Merciless’ because from a fans view point they have got better and better with each release, not bad from a bunch of guys from Bath……. So whilst the rest of the world is raving about Vintage Trouble (fully understandably, I might add) I’ve seen both of them a few times each live, do a search and pull these guys up, I know which one I prefer. Opener ‘Since You Been Gone’ hits you straight from the off, the retro vibe and Isaac Hayes style entry just grabs you, this is straight up funk rock and soul led from the front and what a front man Kevin Swaby is turning in to. I mean anything with horns in does me every time, and it just builds and builds, and listen to the reverb on the guitar!!!!!! Next up ‘What Happened To The Love?’ hits a funk/gospel groove, just listen to that backing and you really start to hear the Hammond noodling away in the background. On to ‘Not The One’ and you’re really caught up in the groove, slow and funky hints of Sly & The Family Stone underpinning the sound, step forward the bass. There is not a weak track on ‘Hurt And The Merciless’ period, while there’s very definitely a retro vibe, grounded in ‘70s funk rock and soul, you realise quickly that it’s been refreshed and up dated for 2016. I don’t think there’s actually a standout track on the LP mind,simply because it is all bloody brilliant. I can see ‘Nobody’s Hero’ perhaps featuring in the next Tarantino Western, slow and funky with a hint of Spaghetti Western stylee. Whilst with ‘Miss California’ again you can this see fitting into any number of new productions warning of the dangers of the California lifestyle, then we’re into probably my favourite track on the LP, Turn Up’. This just hits every button, funky/rocky and one you definitely won’t sit still to. Follow that with ‘A Ghost You Can't Forget’ and you’re hooked right into the retro soul vibe, again with this cut I can just see every marketing manager smiling…broadly. I’m not going to go through every track on ‘Hurt And The Merciless’ because it is all simply stunning, totally showcasing a band coming into their prime, a band who deserve every break they can get. And you know what? Not one song is over four and a half minutes, so welcome to The Heavy, the most famous band you’ve never heard of, embrace the sound and then work your way through their back catalogue, the earlier albums show you how far they’ve come, in fact there’s even a hint of New Orleans with LP closer ‘Goodbye Baby’ just to reinforce that point once again, what more could you want from a band?
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Red Light Management
Scoop.it!

Heavy Hitters | Music Week | May 2016

Heavy Hitters | Music Week | May 2016 | The Heavy | Scoop.it
The Heavy at Music Week. May 2016
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Red Light Management
Scoop.it!

An Interview with The Heavy: We Talk New Album “Hurt & The Merciless,” Marmite and Grand-Dad Dancing to DJ Jazzy Jeff | Grimy Gods | 22 April 2016

An Interview with The Heavy: We Talk New Album “Hurt & The Merciless,” Marmite and Grand-Dad Dancing to DJ Jazzy Jeff | Grimy Gods | 22 April 2016 | The Heavy | Scoop.it

I’ve been a fan of UK rock n’ soul band The Heavy for some time now, instantly hooked by their big, 2009 hit single “How You Like Me Now?” and then again by their 2012 release The Glorious Dead. So when I found out that their new album, Hurt & The Merciless, was dropping April 1st via Counter Records/Bad Son Recording Co. I was over the moon, and also anxious, hoping that it would live up to the high standard that The Glorious Dead set four years ago. Hallelujah! A couple of listens in and I was elated to find out that Hurt & The Merciless was indeed living up to the hype, a worthy and welcome fourth studio album. 


I spoke with humble-as-pie front man Kelvin Swaby to learn more about the making of the new album. The band took a different route in the recording process. “This time myself and Dan (Taylor, guitarist), wrote material separately, due to familial circumstances. Then when we came together, we just rehearsed like we would for a show. Getting these songs together and just making them sound as hard, and as tough, and as meaty as they possibly could before even hitting record.” 


When it comes to favorite tracks on the album it’s truly hard to choose just one but I had to ask Kelvin what his favorite is: “I love “What Happened To The Love.” I wrote that at a time where I was going through some personal distress. I remember getting on a plane, to go record some gospel in Columbus, Georgia, and by the time I left Heathrow and arrived in America, I had written this song. It was only 12 bpms (beats per minute) slower than the version that’s actually on the album, but I knew it was a great song. Later on, I ended up making it 12 bpms faster, took it back to the band and we got the song down perfectly in about four hours. When a song takes four hours from beginning to end, it’s pretty fucking cool.” 


The Heavy photo Kelvin Swaby of The Heavy Another cool thing on The Heavy’s roster was their recent Coachella side show gig at The Roxy this past Wednesday. Their set at The Roxy spanned their discography, with songs both old and new. The crowd showered them with praise throughout. From a soul clapping session during “What Happened To The Love?” to howling loudly along with “Big Bad Wolf” — charismatic vocalist Kelvin Swaby joyously shared hi-fives with the entire front row at the top of “Curse Me Good.” 


The band thoroughly impressed with their high energy set and they even presented a long-time fan and his fiancee a bottle of champagne on stage just before “What Makes A Good Man?” I was soaked in sweat by the time the encore was through, so there’s no doubt in my mind that Coachella crowd-goers will be beyond stoked to catch their performance this weekend. The band is committed to always performing their best and as Kelvin swears, “Whether it’s a crowd of 20 people or 20,000 people, we still kick it out…We’ll always kick it out, regardless of whatever the crowd is. 


When touring the states, I asked Swaby what he misses most about the UK but also what he loves about spending time in the States, “…everyone misses family, and you wish you could take your family with you but it’s just not a viable option with a band our size. There are things like PG Tips English tea, stuff like Marmite that you miss. Marmite is a British staple, it is a yeast spread that you either love or hate, but we all love it…I also love record shops. You still have an abundance of underground record shops which I absolutely adore. Trying to find and seek out and use hours to find records that I never ever heard of, love that shit.” 


In addition to listening to a lot of doo-wop and ’50s music, Swaby revealed what always gets him moving on the dance floor: “Any time I’ve seen DJ Jazzy Jeff, and I’ve been fortunate enough to watch him a number of times, that dude always plays the baddest hip-hop. Shit that you’ve got in your collection but it’s just the way he kinda plays…he’ll play 45 seconds to a minute of each track, and just always play the most hype parts, so it feels like your legs are going to fall off by the end of him playing. If I think of tracks that I absolutely need to dance to, it could be anything from The Sonics to…Scenarios’ remix by Tribe Called Quest, or some shit. I don’t dance too much because I’m an old man, man, so I’m like grand dad dancing.” 



In addition to their Coachella set, The Heavy’s Hurt & The Merciless tour continues to roll through North America until early June, including Southern California dates at The Glass House on April 22 with the Arcs and Velvet Jones in Santa Barbara on April 25. Words: Emily Saex

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Red Light Management
Scoop.it!

The Heavy’s “Hurt & the Merciless” Out Now; 2016 World Tour Kicks Off At Coachella Festival This Weekend | Rock Subculture | 13 April 2016

The Heavy’s “Hurt & the Merciless” Out Now; 2016 World Tour Kicks Off At Coachella Festival This Weekend | Rock Subculture | 13 April 2016 | The Heavy | Scoop.it

English indie band The Heavy have released their latest studio album Hurt & the Merciless this month and will be kicking off their world tour with their Coachella Festival appearance this weekend. You can learn more about the new album and buy tickets to shows on their official site at www.theheavy.co.uk: The-Heavy-2016-World-Tour-Concert-Dates-Cities-Tickets-Hurt-&-The-Merciless Below is their latest music video, “What Happened To The Love?”: Below is the current list of dates and cities making up this tour, as of the time of this preview: 


17 Apr Indio CA Coachella Festival 

20 Apr Los Angeles CA The Roxy 

22 Apr Pomona CA The Glasshouse 

24 Apr Indio CA Coachella Festival 25 Apr Santa Barbara CA Velvet Jones 

26 Apr San Francisco CA The Independent 

27 Apr Santa Cruz CA The Catalyst 

29 Apr Portland OR Bossanova Ballroom 

01 May Seattle WA Neumos 02 May Vancouver BC Commodore Ballroom 

12 May Birmingham UK Academy 2 

13 May Manchester UK Academy 2 

14 May Newcastle UK University 

15 May Glasgow UK Oran Mor 

17 May London UK Heaven 

18 May Bristol UK O2 Academy 

20 May Antwerp BE Trix Club 

21 May Amsterdam NL Melkweg 

22 May Cologne DE Luxor 

23 May Berlin DE Columbia Theater 

25 May Zurich CH Mascotte 

26 May Paris FR Trabendo 

03 Jun Providence RI Alex and Ani Center 

04 Jun Houston TX Houston Free Press 

09 Jun Washington DC 9:30 Club 

17 Jun Hilvarenbeek NL Best Kept Secret 

18 Jun Frankfurt DE Batschkapp 

19 Jun Prague CZ Roxy 

21 Jun Zagreb HR INMusic Festival

 22 Jun Budapest HU A38 

23 Jun Vienna AT Flex 

25 Jun Neuhausen DE Southside Festival 

26 Jun Scheessel DE Hurricane Festival 

23 Jul Fuji JP Fuji Rock Rock 



Subculture last covered The Heavy at Caprices Festival in Switzerland in 2013 – you can check out my interview with the band HERE and my review of their live set HERE.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Red Light Management
Scoop.it!

The Heavy Start Touring In Support Of New Album At Coachella | Blurred Culture | 21 April 2016

It’s all subjective, but in my humble opinion, one of the dopest albums that was released in 2012 was The Heavy‘s “The Glorious Dead”. It was a soulfully hard hitting, funky blues-rock album with jams like “What Makes a Good Man”, “Curse Me Good” and “Same ‘Ol”. Needless to say, I made my way to a couple of their Los Angeles shows when they were supporting that album. 

 On April 1, 2016, The Heavy released their latest album Hurt & the Merciless and they have started touring in support of it. By playing Coachella, they’ll be prohibited from playing in Los Angeles for a while, so I could only see/hear what they now though the live stream. Kelvin Swaby (the band’s lead singer) has still got it and was as charismatic as I remembered him. With a set that consisted mostly of songs from the latest album, he infused the rawest essence of soul into each note making all of the new songs I had never heard sound familiar.

Personally, I can’t wait to get my hands on a vinyl copy of their new album. BC Thoughts For Weekend 2: If you are looking for a fun set to get your day started, you should make a stop at The Heavy’s stage. Even if you aren’t familiar with the band, I’ll place bets that you’re familiar with their music.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Red Light Management
Scoop.it!

Live Review: The Heavy @ The Hippodrome, Kingston upon Thames | Fortitude Magazine | 6 April 2016

Live Review: The Heavy @ The Hippodrome, Kingston upon Thames | Fortitude Magazine | 6 April 2016 | The Heavy | Scoop.it

The Heavy played a kinetic set at The Hippodrome in support of the release of their new album, Hurt & the Merciless. The Bath quartet, best known for their neo-soul rock ‘n’ roll, performed songs from their new album, including ‘Since You Been Gone’ — a prolific track filled with the en masse calls of “the rain drops don’t stop falling.” This is a band that puts the grooves into an audience without trying; an uber-cool stage presence coupled with lead singer Kelvin Swaby’s suave self-assurance makes them a must-see live act. “Reminiscent of The Kink” They also performed songs from their previous album, The Glorious Dead, including ‘Same Ol’’; with opaque drum beats, it’s a track with a lot of attitude. The instrumental for ‘Same Ol’’ was also featured on Quentin Tarantino’s The Hateful Eight trailer. Another Hurt & the Merciless track followed, ‘Turn Up’, with it’s infectious beat, Swaby’s distinct vocals and the up-tempo rhythm inspired a new generation of equally good and bad moves from the audience. That said, there isn’t a single person that doesn’t move at a Heavy gig. ‘Short Change Hero’ was perhaps the highlight of the show, with its dark Ennio Morricone-esque sounds and sharp lyrics. The Heavy blend rock ‘n’ roll and blues with classic R ‘n’ B to create songs plethoric in melancholy and abstraction. With an intro reminiscent of The Kinks ‘You Really Got Me’, the band played ‘What Happened to the Love?’. The Heavy combined anthemic vocals with funky rhythms for most of their set and ended the night on their most well-known track ‘How Do You Like Me Now?’ The Heavy are refined musicians with an assertive sound similar to The Black Keys, and following the release of their new album that exploits their live energy, it all looks very promising for them. Hurt & the Merciless is available to download here

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Red Light Management
Scoop.it!

SPILL NEW MUSIC: THE HEAVY - WHAT HAPPENED TO THE LOVE |  The Spill Magazine | 5 April 2016

SPILL NEW MUSIC: THE HEAVY - WHAT HAPPENED TO THE LOVE |  The Spill Magazine | 5 April 2016 | The Heavy | Scoop.it

VIBRANT NEW SINGLE OFF UK QUARTET’S “HURT & THE MERCILESS” Bad Son Recording Company UK quartet The Heavy will return April 1 with their most exhilarating record yet – “Hurt & The Merciless.” Recorded live in a remote studio on the fringes of their hometown, the band was determined to harness the raw power of their concerts and looked to their earliest bedroom recordings as inspiration. A lot has happened since those days: a Gold record, millions of streams and performances on the world’s biggest stages. Written over the past four years, while members of the band went through some dark times including a divorce – “Hurt & The Merciless” is relentless, tough and gritty. The Heavy are set to perform at Coachella and have confirmed a West Coast run in April. A confluence of obsessions – from classic rock, soul and hip hop, to crate digging and sampling – are what brought The Heavy together, and “Hurt & The Merciless” is a musical culmination of these influences. A good deal of heartache went into the writing process as well. “Songs like ‘What Happened To The Love?,’ ‘Mean Old Man’ and ‘The Apology’ were necessary, they needed to be expelled from my system,” says frontman Kelv Swaby. Lead single “Since You Been Gone” is exuberant soul with big horns and a backing chorus, partly inspired by Kelv’s love for Motown and penned while on a tour bus travelling the US. While “The Apology” came from a dark place, it’s set to a hurtling disco. The gospel-flecked cool down of “Goodbye Baby” closes the album. Tour Dates 4/17 – Coachella Festival – Indio, CA 4/20 – The Roxy – Los Angeles, CA 4/22 – The Glasshouse (support for The Arcs) – Pomona, CA 4/24 – Coachella Festival – Indio, CA 4/25 – Velvet Jones – Santa Barbara, CA 4/26 – The Independent – San Francisco, CA 4/27 – The Catalyst – Santa Cruz, CA 4/29 – Bossanova Ballroom – Portland, OR 5/1 – Neumos – Seattle, WA 5/2 – Commodore Ballroom – Vancouver, BC 5/12 – Academy 2 – Birmingham, UK 5/13 – Academy 2 – Manchester, UK 5/14 – University – Newcastle, UK 5/15 – Oran Mor – Glasgow, UK 5/17 – Heaven – London, UK 5/18 – O2 Academy – Bristol, UK 5/20 – Triz Club – Antwerp, Belgium 5/21 – Melkweg – Amsterdam, Netherlands 5/22 – Luxor – Cologne, Germany 5/23 – Columbia Theater – Berlin, Germany 5/25 – Mascotte – Zurich, Switzerland 5/26 – Trabendo – Paris, France The Heavy Hurt & The Merciless (Bad Son Recording Company) Release Date: April 2016 Order via itunes-icon2-300x300band website Track List 1. Since You Been Gone 2. What Happened To The Love? 3. Not The One 4. The Apology 5. Nobody’s Hero 6. Miss California 7. Turn Up 8. A Ghost You Can’t Forget 9. Last Confession 10. Mean Ol’ Man 11. Slave To Your Love 12. Goodbye Baby

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Red Light Management
Scoop.it!

The Heavy Return With Raw Power on ‘Hurt & The Merciless,’ Out Today | Showfire | 1 April 2016

The Heavy Return With Raw Power on 'Hurt & The Merciless,' Out Today CBS This Morning Performance Airs Tomorrow, March Madness Theme Song, Coachella Super sonic soul group The Heavy released 'Hurt & The Merciless' today, their first album in four years. Tomorrow, the band will perform their hard-hitting single "Since You Been Gone" on CBS This Morning. Their song "Turn Up" has been the theme song for the NCAA Men's basketball tournament for weeks, playing repeatedly through televised March Madness games and festivities. The band exclusively streamed the album last week on Pandora and it's available today for streaming on all digital platforms. They've also just premiered a new video, for rambunctious soul cut "What Happened To The Love." Watch it here: https://vimeo.com/161010601/4cfddf1bdf The UK's Q Magazine offered early praise for the new record, calling it "Zeppelin-meets-Motown" and adding "'Hurt & The Merciless' testifies like James Brown on a mountaintop." The Heavy were at SXSW this year and one of their many performances was streamed through NPR Music: n.pr/1VVirDB. The band also sat down with Fast Company in Austin to discuss their licensing success. In the coming months, they'll perform during both weekends of Coachella, and on a West Coast tour that includes a sold-out, headlining gig at The Roxy in LA. A full list of U.S. tour dates is below. TOUR DATES: 4/17 - Coachella Festival - Indio, CA 4/20 - The Roxy - Los Angeles, CA 4/22 - The Glasshouse - Pomona, CA 4/24 - Coachella Festival - Indio, CA 4/25 - Velvet Jones - Santa Barbara, CA 4/26 - The Independent - San Francisco, CA 4/27 - The Catalyst - Santa Cruz, CA 4/29 - Bossanova Ballroom - Portland, OR 5/1 - Neumos - Seattle, WA 5/2 - Commodore Ballroom - Vancouver, BC

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Red Light Management
Scoop.it!

The Heavy - Hurt & The Merciless [Translation] | Sound of Brit | 1 April 2016

The Heavy - Hurt & The Merciless [Translation] | Sound of Brit | 1 April 2016 | The Heavy | Scoop.it

The rock invigorating to The Heavy, wet with funky brass and soul, comes to the forefront with their new album Hurt & The Merciless . Founded in the mid 2000s, The Heavy continue their merry way and resurface in this day of 1 st April with the release of their new album Hurt & the Merciless . And this is not an April Fool ... Announced a few weeks ago, the 4 th installment of this band from Noid, near Bath in the southwest of England, remains in the continuity of their musical style; ie a mix of hard-hitting rock and roll, funk and soul dripping. A bit like a good old recipe of grandmother, the troupe of singer Kelvin Swaby, singer in his parish church during his childhood, has put together this new jewel with love. The formula is known, so delicious that we forget a tad, lack of English risk-taking. Indeed, this last rant, the mixture of cultures and musical genres, which is their trademark, is still alive and well. Brass forward, the disc opens with the punchy Since You Been Gone , to the point that feels like back in the heyday of Motown. But the rock n 'roll edge quickly his nose with What Happened To The Love? , As illustrated by the enthusiasm of drummer Chris Ellul and guitarist Dan Taylor. Not The One then takes us on a funky blues atmosphere, while The Apology flirts with disco and dance base. In short, the stage is set, the quartet will, throughout this 45 minutes sprees, we make a leap in the past by switching from one style to another, pieces after pieces. In the frenzy, some calm vents, such as Nobody's Hero to mariachi sauce and Goodbye Baby in conclusion , are welcome and help calm things down. Like the movies of Quentin Tarantino, unpredictable and punchy, their music features sound crazy, rock and roll, soul, old school. It is not surprising that the QT master has also set his sights on the group to show the trailer for his latest film The Filthy 8 ( the hateful eight ). Far from the current electro-pop trend and fashion trends, The Heavy stays true to their DNA vintage, which has attracted many advertisers, media and other directors. Hurt & The Merciless is in the pure tradition of his predecessors, however, this album suffers from the lack of surprise effect and unlike the énormissime the House that Dirt Built and many power tubes, it lacks some key titles to illuminate this musical eclecticism. Tracklisting: Since You Been Gone What Happened To the Love? Not the One The Apology Nobody's Hero Miss California Turn Up A Ghost You Can not Forget Last Confession Mean Ol 'Man Slave To Your Love Goodbye Baby Our favorite songs : What Happened To the Love, The Apology, A Ghost You Can not Forget? NOTE: 7/10 The Heavy Concerts The Heavy to Paris - May 26, 2016 tags: chronic , critical , Hurt & The Merciless , Kelvin Swaby , review , Since You Been Gone , the heavy , What Happened To the Love?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Red Light Management
Scoop.it!

The Heavy – Hurt & the Merciless | Beat Route | 5 April 2016 

The Heavy – Hurt & the Merciless | Beat Route | 5 April 2016  | The Heavy | Scoop.it

Even though Amy Winehouse, and now Adele, kicked the door wide open in the U.K. with their spin on blue-eyed soul, that genre has always been a steady force in Britain. Turn back the clock to the early days of The Who when Roger Daltry was still impersonating his favourite black R&B singers, when Steve Marriot fronted The Small Faces with his scorching, soul-drenched vocals, when Eric Burdon single-handedly redefined soul for the young and restless with The Animals’ painfully beautiful version of “The House of the Rising Sun,” or when Joe Cocker’s tormented breakdowns were simply soul-driven exorcisms of the highest power. All those lads had the fire in their fingertips and easily set the house, the heavens ablaze. There’s a long list of singers from that burst of British blues-makers in the ‘60s that made their mark in similar ways. Soul, fiery soul, made in the U.K., is a cultural trademark, deeply embedded. When The Heavy emerged from Bath, England in 2007 with their debut Great Vengeance and Furious Fire, it was all too clear that a splendid blend of Massive Attack’s scratchy, seductive trip-hop and the Black Keys’ dirty garage blues led by Kelvin Sawby’s resurrection of Otis Redding that another U.K. tour de soul-force had been launched. Surprisingly, The Heavy, even with profound critical acclaim and a string of brain-exploding singles, hardly register on the pop-culture radar—nowhere near Amy and Adele’s bleeps screaming off the screen. Perhaps that’s because while the band can snap out infectious soul-stingers, they’re still far too steeped in street swagger and experimentation to be properly groomed for the upper echelon of pop stardom. We can thank our lucky stars for that. The lead off track, “Since You’ve Been Gone,” from their fourth album, Hurt & The Merciless, is yet another true testament that this band is incapable of releasing a bad track that strives to dominate the dance floor for three-and-a-half minutes. The rhythm section digs in with breakdowns so deep the Public Enemy influence can’t go unnoticed. Yet the only politicization found here are those that also run through Amy and Adele’s music—the torn, heartbreak fabric of domestic life. The Heavy are full of strife, full of stories of unpretentious accounts of everyday life that lends to both a vulnerability and an extremely attractive authenticity. It’s a curious, but wonderful thing, when one of the best rock-steady bands in the world plays into the anti-thesis of the spotlight and would rather shine on the sidelines and in the shadows than be yet another beast of celebrity. What also makes The Heavy such a rich experience, is their deviation away from trying to make a repetitive cluster of slinky-smooth, in-the-pocket, feel-good, soul-spinners. While Memphis-driven horns anchor “The Apology” with a sweet, melodic hook, Dan Taylor’s crackling fuzz guitar and Sawby’s distorted vocals steer that sweet sound into a darker tunnel of love. Similarly the dub-infused “Miss California,” the sorry demise of a beauty queen, also detours from its primal groove and pulls in a mariachi horn cameo. “Slave To Your Love” is a good old-fashioned, rave-up, garage stomper that shows no restraint with its wall of wailing horns, guitar flurries and female backup vocals in full flight. Ending the record, Sawby tears a page from the Percy Sledge songbook with the barroom, gospel-tinged ballad “Goodbye Baby.” The Heavy amplify British soul and R&B. Expect tradition. Expect them to fuck with it, and do it well.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Red Light Management
Scoop.it!

Hurt & The Merciless | Full Official Chart History | Official Charts Company | 8 April 2016

Hurt & The Merciless | Full Official Chart History | Official Charts Company | 8 April 2016 | The Heavy | Scoop.it
The very latest chart stats about hurt+%26+the+merciless - peak chart position, weeks on chart, week-by-week chart run, catalogue number
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Red Light Management
Scoop.it!

The Heavy Exclusive playlist & new album details | Fred Peryy | March 2016

The Heavy Exclusive playlist & new album details | Fred Peryy | March 2016 | The Heavy | Scoop.it
Next Article » The Heavy Exclusive playlist & new album details Bath quartet The Heavy release their self-produced fourth album on April 1st called ‘Hurt & The Merciless’ through Counter Records. The new record is arguably their most powerful and personal to date so in celebration we've asked them to put together a playlist of music that has inspired them not just on this album, but over the years as well. Perhaps best known for their global hit ‘How You Like Me Now?’, The Heavy’s genre-blending sound has been described as fusing “Prince, The Rolling Stones and 60’s Garage” (Q) and “breathing sweaty life into garage-punk, ska, voodoo funk, swamp rock, dub, blues and classic R&B/soul” (Uncut). It’s an intoxicating mix that has brought the band considerable international success. They’ve had over 100 million online streams and their songs have appeared in many of the coolest films and TV series of the past few years. Whilst making ‘Hurt & The Merciless’, The Heavy went through some dark times. There was death, divorce, near break-ups and breakdowns. It all feeds into their most exhilarating record yet. “We attack all of these things,” says frontman Kelvin Swaby, “and the only way we know how to do that is by writing incredible music.” Everything Swaby and his band-mates guitarist Dan Taylor, bassist Spencer Page and drummer Chris Ellul have achieved over the past decade feels like it has been leading to this point. ESG - Dance ESG were an all female, post punk band from the South Bronx in the early 80's and the song Dance is a track that's influenced the record throughout, with it's super, mechanically tight drum sound and a weight to kill for. Ruth Swann - Tainted Love* Ruth Swann's Tainted Love is an incredible version of the Gloria Jones classic. The horns are bigger, the drums are tougher and the punch of both of those on this version was something we looked to for The Apology. *NOTE - This version isn't on Spotify so Gloria Jones original features in the playlist above, Ruth Swann's version can be found on Youtube. Smokey Robinson - Get Ready ACDC - Whole Lotta Rosie Get Ready by Smokey Robinson and Whole Lotta Rosie by ACDC were on my dial so much on a trip to Columbus, GA a few years ago. The almost lazy but pin point Smokey falsetto, against the rasp and unbelievable grit of Brian Johnson, really put me in the mood for writing What Happened To The Love. These two really helped through a tough tough time. Aretha Franklin - Think I've always thought that the intro to Aretha Franklin's Think works as an unsuspecting prelude to one of the baddest Aretha songs. It's like calm, calm.....calm and then BOOM!!! The Sonics - Cinderella I recently saw the Sonics perform Cinderella at Koko in London and can quite honestly say that it sounded as dirty, as heartfelt and as cruel as it ever had on record. It was a great reference point for the Slave To Your Love vocal.....albeit less the terror screams. Taking Of Pelham 123 - Opening Titles* The horns that are played on the opening title sequence to the original Taking Of Pelham 123, that were scored by David Shire in 1974, are some of the heaviest, most intense horns that have ever graced my ears. Always have had them as a reference within what we produce but nothing ever felt right until we were recording Hurt And The Merciless. In walked The Apology and that vibe seemed to resonate with a lot of the horn parts from that moment on. *NOTE - The version featured on our playlist above is performed by the Czech Philharmonic Orchestra, you can find the original score on Youtube. Shirley Ellis - The Handclapping Song The Handclapping song by Shirley Ellis is so playful as a rhythm but makes a head nod to the point of aching. It will always be that way for me, any time I play it. Never will it cease to amaze and forever be a favourite amongst my blood and Heavy families. Eddie Floyd - Big Bird Big Bird by Eddie Floyd remains a top influence when we think soaring, screaming horn or guitar lines and a dirt that's achieved through driving amps or channels, without the use of pedals or plugins. Chuck Brown and The Soul Searchers - Blow Your Whistle The swagger and confidence in the vocal on Blow Your Whistle by Chuck Brown and The Soul Searchers........wow!!!! Working like a soul hype man through the entirety of the song, while the band sit tight on that super bad and unbelievable recurring riff. You can help but move to this and really encouraged the uptempo side for Hurt. Chaka Khan - Ain't Nobody A hip hop classic and a strong reference for Not The One. We were determined to honestly inject The Clash, Chic and the early 80's fusion of punk and disco into this one for sure. I think we really managed to play in that ballpark. The video above is for lead single ‘Since You Been Gone’ a high-octane soul number with Motown horns and dirty guitars. It was directed by Focus Creeps (Arctic Monkeys, King Krule) and stars Thomas Turgoose (‘This Is England’) and Abigail Hardingham (‘Nina Forever’) as a couple in the throes of a break-up. Hurt & The merciless Track List: 1. Since You Been Gone 2. What Happened To The Love? 3. Not The One 4. The Apology 5. Nobody’s Hero 6. Miss California 7. Turn Up 8. A Ghost You Can’t Forget 9. Last Confession 10. Mean Ol’ Man 11. Slave To Your Love 12. Goodbye Baby Tour Dates: April 17 Coachella Festival - Indio, CA April 20 The Roxy - Los Angeles, CA April 22 The Glasshouse (support for The Arcs) - Pomona, CA April 24 Coachella Festival - Indio, CA April 25 Velvet Jones - Santa Barbara, CA April 26 The Independent - San Francisco, CA April 27 The Catalyst, Santa Cruz, CA April 29 Bossanova Ballroom - Portland, OR May 1 Neumos - Seattle, WA May 2 Commodore Ballroom - Vancouver, BC May 12 Academy 2 - Birmingham, UK May 13 Academy 2 - Manchester, UK May 14 University - Newcastle, UK May 15 Oran Mor - Glasgow, UK May 17 Heaven - London, UK May 18 O2 Academy - Bristol, UK May 20 Triz Club - Antwerp, Belgium May 21 Melkweg - Amsterdam, Netherlands May 22 Luxor - Cologne, Germany May 23 Columbia Theater - Berlin, Germany May 25 Mascotte - Zurich, Switzerland May 26 Trabendo - Paris, France Related Links Facebook Twitter Official Website Purchase Link
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Red Light Management
Scoop.it!

VariousCrap.com: Music Review: The Heavy - Hurt & The Merciless

VariousCrap.com: Music Review: The Heavy - Hurt & The Merciless | The Heavy | Scoop.it
One of my favorite bands I've gotten into in the last 10 years or so is England's The Heavy. The Heavy got on my radar with their song How You Like Me Now when it was used in a Kia car commercial. I loved the song so much I had to find out who did it and after I did, I bought their album and I have been hooked ever since. What I love about this band is their throwback style which mixes rock, funk and soul. This past April The Heavy put out their fourth album Hurt & the Merciless and it may be my favorite album they have ever done. Each album is great, but this one has so much groove to it, it can make even a white boy like me want to dance. The album explodes with Since You Been Gone which features killer drums and horns. Songs like What Happened to the Love, The Apology and Turn Up continue that great mix of rock, funk and soul that makes this band so unique in today's music climate. I can honestly say that this album has no filler as far as I'm concerned. I even like the more mellow tunes like Nobody's Hero and Goodbye Baby. I've said this before and I'll say it again, I just don't understand why this band isn't bigger than they are. They have all the elements a band needs to achieve huge success and they should be on everyone's radar.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Red Light Management
Scoop.it!

The Heavy / The Family Rain / Bite The Buffalo - Bristol O2 Academy - 18th May 2016

The Heavy / The Family Rain / Bite The Buffalo - Bristol O2 Academy - 18th May 2016 | The Heavy | Scoop.it

Over the last 5 or 6 years - wow it really has been that long writing for Uber Rock - I’ve seen any number of shows, reviewed any number of LPs but certain bands have stuck with me after initially coming into my orbit via the website to excite. The Urban Voodoo Machine, The Legendary Shack Shakers, Vintage Trouble and The Computers to name a few but none more so than tonight’s headliners The Heavy. From first seeing them live about four years ago in the Fiddlers Club in Bristol, to catching them headlining the same city’s Grillstock event, before I then went on to witness a blinding headline performance in Bristol’s O2 Academy supported by an equally blinding performance by the Computers. I’ve watched these guys from neighbouring Bath develop, enhancing their sound and ultimately hitting the stage in their career where the biggest venues should come calling worldwide, they are certainly way beyond festival opening status, Frontman Kevin Swaby in particular holds any audience in the palm of his hand without even trying, this used to be called “star quality”. What I’ve also come to realize following The Heavy is that Kevin’s only really as good as the band pushing him from behind, and true to form The Heavy are all consummate musicians from the backing vocalists to the brass section to the twin guitarists, bass, drummer and keyboard player, there were 10 of them on stage tonight and every single element was spot on, and tight as…… The Heavy But before the headliners, a rapidly swelling, sell-out crowd were treated to two other bands. Openers Bite The Buffalo also hail from Bath, but I’ve gotta’ be honest and say they didn’t quite cut it for me. There were instances when things seemed to click into place and we had a scuzzed up rock ‘n’ roll band, there were times too when vocally we had a hint of Ryan Adams, but ultimately everything felt too lose, and not in a Johnny Thunders/New York Dolls good way either. I get this was probably the biggest gig they’ve ever played, but make the most of it, if you’re gonna do sloppy, do it in style, at least so it seems to be part of the act rather than leave me thinking the frontman is too pissed and can’t remember what he’s just said. But what the hell do I know? Next up and again from Bath are The Family Rain and things definitely moved up a gear with these guys, professional, tight, and pretty much spot on, however they also possessed a very different sound to Bite The Buffalo. To me they hinted at alt-rock and the Placebo style of histrionics, again scuzzed up but done with some style. The Family Rain are a band that the more I listened, the more I got into them. Note to self, check out back catalogue. Definitely veering towards the indie rock arena sound and definitely a band I’m gonna catch again soon. And so we come to The Heavy, a band who have a new album to promote and one that I reviewed RIGHT HERE on Uber Rock. I absolutely loved the retro soul/funk/rock mash up of ‘Hurt And The Merciless’ and boy could I not wait to hear it being kicked up the arse live and with a sell-out crowd hanging on to every lick and vocal. The Heavy 1 Boy did tonight not disappoint. After a time touring Japan The Heavy are just so well oiled in that funk/soul style - so loose as well, nothing is forced. Remember there are 10 musicians on stage at any one time, so it’s back to that retro Sly and The Family Stone style underpinning pretty much everything. Opening up with the voodoo soul/New Orleans tinged ‘Can’t Play Dead’ the audience are caught straight away and are straight under the band’s spell. Then we’re quickly into a trio from the new LP ‘The Apology’, ‘Not The One’ and ‘Miss California’, this is about as filthy as funk can get, before we’re pulled into the back catalogue with Sky TV’s Strike Back soundtrack burner ‘Short Change Hero’, and live this is a very different beast. The audience call and response within ‘Big Bad Wolf’, the singalong to ‘Same Ol’, you just had to be there to believe it, and it just built and built. What really surprised me was that I found myself veering more to the new stuff than the classics I’ve heard live so many times previously. It was just that funk/soul groove. The Heavy seem to have completely nailed it, and we had no less than eight tracks from the new album, not one of them out of place and every one a blinder live. When the band left the stage from the main set it seemed that we’d been there five minutes! The Heavy 3 Coming back on I wondered how the encore was gonna match the main set, and to be honest it absolutely blew the set away. Encore opener ‘Slave To Your Love’ literally took the roof off the O2 no question at all, this was track of the night on probably the gig of the year for me so far. So to then follow that with ‘What Makes A Good Man’ and “How You Like Me Now’, what more can you want? This was ninety minutes that seemed like 5, it was that good. It really is time to worship at the church of The Heavy, the dirtiest/funkiest rock and soul band out there period. I’m still stunned as I write this up.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Red Light Management
Scoop.it!

The Heavy "Turn Up" on Conan O'Brien Presents: Team Coco | 5 May 2016

The Heavy "Turn Up" on  Conan O'Brien Presents: Team Coco | 5 May 2016 | The Heavy | Scoop.it
VIDEO: The Heavy "Turn Up" 05/04/16
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Red Light Management
Scoop.it!

The Heavy Hurt & the Merciless | Exclaim | 1 April 2016

The Heavy Hurt & the Merciless | Exclaim | 1 April 2016 | The Heavy | Scoop.it



It's been four long years since the Heavy gave us the eerily soulful The Glorious Dead, and the time off has been kind to the English groove-rockers. The band comes out guns ablaze on Hurt & the Merciless' opening burning track, "Since You've Been Gone," and don't let up until the end of the proceedings. Songs like "What Happened To The Love?" and "Mean Old Man" hammer the listener with relentless, driving force, with thick groovy valleys punctuated by the piercing horn lines that colour the album. 


Though their music has always been rooted in American rhythm and blues, on Hurt & the Merciless, the Heavy give more than a nod to some of the more classic rock tendencies. "The Apology" has some serious "You Really Got Me Now" vibes going, and on one of the albums standout tracks, "A Ghost You Can't Forget," the band let the drama rise to the surface as lead singer and obvious superstar Kelvin Swaby channels his inner Tom Waits over an oozing vaudeville beat. Despite some slower dramatic moments like that track, the album doesn't really let up until the album's closer, the heart-wrenching soul ballad "Goodbye Baby." 


Hurt & the Merciless is another strong outing for one of the most unique rock bands around, full of the groove, soul and big shiny instrumentation that defines the Heavy. (Ninja Tune)

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Red Light Management
Scoop.it!

THE ARCS + THE HEAVY + MARIACHI FLOR DE TOLOACHE @ THE GLASS HOUSE | LA Record | 24 April 2016

THE ARCS + THE HEAVY + MARIACHI FLOR DE TOLOACHE @ THE GLASS HOUSE | LA Record | 24 April 2016 | The Heavy | Scoop.it

Photos and recap by Leslie Kalohi Another excellent sold out, 


Localchella show graced Pomona’s Glass House venue by pairing up The Arcs and The Heavy ahead of the second weekend of Coachella. Led by Dan Auerbach of The Black Keys, who is now more used to performing at large music festivals and sports arenas, The Arcs is a wonderful showcase of a differently detailed sonic experience. As the title of the band’s debut album suggest, Yours, Dreamily is full of beautifully ambient, shoegazing touches. 


While songs by The Black Keys tend to run a tight ship, The Arcs let the flow and ebb of melody and instrumentation take control of the journey as themes of pop, gospel, and funk are explored. There was plenty of room for several extended, passionate guitar solos by Auerbach, much to the delight of fans. The sophisticated lighting and sound design only enhanced The Arcs live show as the band worked through a majority of its album, as well as covers by The Temptations and The Blue Rondos. UK’s The Heavy was one unstoppable party from start to finish, with the band barely taking a second to slow down. 


Led by frontman/singer Kelvin Swaby, the set was high on energy, and included new songs from latest album, Hurt & The Merciless, as well as its famous hit, “How You Like Me Now?” The women of Mariachi Flor De Toloache not only opened the night, but later returned for several songs during The Arcs. Vaudeville and Celtic influences give the the music and vocal harmonies an interesting kick that is perfectly matched against a fiery fiddle and soulful trumpet. A cover of Nirvana’s “Come As You Are” was the perfect example of the group’s range.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Red Light Management
Scoop.it!

Video: The Heavy live from The Baeble Bounce House | Baeble Music | 18 March 2016

Video: The Heavy live from The Baeble Bounce House | Baeble Music | 18 March 2016 | The Heavy | Scoop.it

Feel free to lose your damn mind to the down and dirty sounds of the UK soul outfit, The Heavy. 


The Heavy have a song on their 2012 album The Glorious Dead called "The Big Bad Wolf". It's about the most perfect song title I can think of for this down and dirty, bruising, UK outfit. See, the band draw influence from funk, soul, hip-hop, and rock, but there's something about their tunes that is sneaky, if not a little menacing. They red line past what is considered...err, pleasant to ear drums. They are raw and distorted. They are a force! They want to blow the damn house down. And if you're not up for that, vocalist Kelvin Swaby ain't really up for playing for you. Or at least that's what we learned when the band popped in on our Baeble Bounce House in Austin last month with a fresh batch of cuts from their newest LP, Hurt and The Merciless. Swaby stalked the stage (and a few audience members who weren't participating...Gawd! SX crowds!), baiting the crowd to get into it, slowly but surely riling them up throughout the entirety of the band's performance. The result was a crescendo of energy, culminating in an entire venue losing their damn minds to the band's classic single "How You Like Me Now". How's that for The Big Bad Wolf?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Red Light Management
Scoop.it!

Watch: The Heavy - “What Happened to the Love?” Video | Under the radar Magazine | 1 April 2016

Watch: The Heavy - “What Happened to the Love?” Video | Under the radar Magazine | 1 April 2016 | The Heavy | Scoop.it

The Heavy released their album Hurt & The Merciless today, and has shared the video for their song "What Happened to the Love?" Like many of their past songs the soul-infused song is infectiously catchy and makes you want to dance. Also, their song "Turn Up" has been the theme song for the NCAA Men's basketball tournament. Watch the video for "What Happened to the Love?" below:

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Red Light Management
Scoop.it!

Interview: The Heavy | Songwriting Magazine | 9 April 2016

Interview: The Heavy | Songwriting Magazine | 9 April 2016 | The Heavy | Scoop.it

Perhaps best known for their global hit How You Like Me Now?, The Heavy are an indie rock band from Bath consisting of Kelvin Swaby on vocals, Dan Taylor on guitar, bass guitarist Spencer Page and drummer Chris Ellul. Their intoxicating blend of dirty soul, swamp rock and garage-punk has brought the band considerable international success, clocking up over 100 million online streams and song placements on some of the coolest films and TV series, including soundtracking trailers to The Hateful Eight and The Big Short. With their new album, Hurt & The Merciless fresh off the production line, we met up with Kelvin and Dan – The Heavy’s founding members and principle songwriters – to talk about the band’s story: from Van Morrison-inspired studio project to Ninja Tune’s much-hyped next big things. It turns out their ‘overnight success’ took seven years and started in a high street clothes shop… Tell us the story of how the band came about. Kelvin: “We met at The Gap didn’t we, which is hilarious.” Dan: “Yeah, we were working in Bath.” K: “We became really good friends and realised we had so much in common. But even though we have a lot of music in common, there was tons of music that we didn’t know, so we’d ‘mixtape’ between each other. I was more into hip-hop and maybe bits of reggae and soul, possibly, and I remember Dan turned me on to Van Morrison and Astral Weeks, basically. I think he did a mixtape that had loads of songs from Moondance on there.” D: “There was a lot of Neil Young on there and the drums on the Harvest record was a real reference point. Like with the song Out On The Weekend, we were talking about them being like hip-hop drums and it became a bit of a thing for us. I’d been playing guitars and in bands, so I had that background.” Were you writing new music together then? D: “No… Well, only bad attempts.” K: “I was writing and had my own thing going on, signed to Naïve Records, which was Tricky’s label before he got picked up by Island. So I came from that background of sampling bits and pieces. I’ve always been interested in film soundtracks and to be able to throw that into music; to make it cinematic and give it width. So, with me coming from that side of the tracks and Dan coming from the live side, and listening to the drums on that Harvest record… Then you’ve got Al Green, circa ’69 to ’72, if you take any of those Willie Mitchell-produced records and turn the bass up, it’s the same thing. It’s hip-hop, essentially, and we thought, ‘Why don’t we just do that?’” The Heavy The Heavy: “It was literally a Yamaha SE10, a Fostex four-track, an acoustic guitar and a microphone. That was it.” D: “I loved the convenience of having a band, but I was like, ‘Wow, we don’t have to have a band!’ We did try finding other people to share our quest, but it was really difficult from where we were in Bath. I don’t know, for whatever reason, they just didn’t… I also think it had a lot to do with our inexperience of not really knowing what we wanted to do. I described myself as having turnips for fingers! It comes with experience and you realise what you’re looking for – it’s about not over-playing.” K: “And that’s what we wanted: to take the ‘faff’ out of our most incredible influences. We don’t need a 10-minute solo, because the groove is there. That’s how we thought originally.” D: “But as soon as you get in a room with other people, they just start to ‘play’, and then we just lost what we were looking for.” Did it have anything to do with the strong chemistry between the two of you, making it difficult for anyone else to come in? D: “No I don’t think it was, because we’ve met people since that made sense. It was just the time we were at and also what’s predetermined, what was meant to be. The thing is, we got better at recording, just the two of us.” What was the recording set-up that you had and when did you get together? K: “It was literally a Yamaha SE10, a Fostex four-track, an acoustic guitar and a microphone. That was it.” D: “I still used to live in Chippenham and would go to the studio afterwards and stay until three or four in the morning, and then go home.” K: “We had a friend’s studio on the London Road and he helped us get some of these ideas down, from the four-track to the studio. It was a great process, when you think about it.” D: “I’d come away with a cassette and, for the first time, I’d think it was really good. Then we had interest from people like EMI – they were intrigued by what we were doing.” K: “I remember we went over and recorded Ain’t Working and [Portishead’s producer] Geoff Barrow said, ‘That track is incredible.’ D: “He let us use State Of Art Studio for a few weeks and we did some recording there. Back then we were really heavily sampling stuff – I fell in love with the convenience of it. And then, as things went on and we got better, we thought, ‘Actually, we don’t need to sample anymore, we can start recording ourselves and create the samples that we want to hear.’ That’s when we really started writing songs.” K: “But I think that shaped what we wanted to do and it makes you hone your craft a lot more. Especially in terms of reverbs and tone.” The Heavy The Heavy: “Spencer had been playing with us then, sporadically, and he introduced us to Chris. That was it then, it all fell into place.” D: “That’s right, you start to use your imagination on creating a soundtrack and really going in deep on instruments, amps, rooms and getting that same thing you loved that was captured in a break from 1969 – making your own samples.” At that point, were they just instrumental grooves without vocals, or complete songs? D: “There was a song called Doing Fine that was like a Neil Young track, on acoustic guitar, and that was a real breakthrough. There were no samples at all, it was all completely organic; a song that we’d just sat down and written. And it really worked and sounded amazing. I think it still is one of the favourites. That was a pivotal moment.” Had you released any material before your debut album, Great Vengeance And Furious Fire? D: “No, it took about seven years to do that album. We were working in Bath and just writing music and learning. It was just the two of us, and…” K: “And then we had a bank of 10 songs. I remember when we put them together, it was always about making a mixtape. We just put all these different genres on to that record and played a gig at Big Chill House in King’s Cross and we were signed within two weeks! They were like, ‘We’ll put the album out, as it is.’ They didn’t want to change a thing.” D: “But then they were really like, ‘You’ve got to sort your band out’. Spencer had been playing with us then, sporadically, and he introduced us to Chris. That was it then, it all fell into place.” During those seven years of just writing, did you ever think it wasn’t going to happen or wondered why you were doing it? K: “We wanted to put stuff out, but we needed the direction and it was Doing Fine and looking at the bank of music that we’d recorded, that made us think, ‘Wow, we have a record here.’ There were tracks that didn’t make that first record and just weren’t relevant, so those 10 tracks were the strongest of a great bunch. We even had How Do You Like Me Now? by then, but we hadn’t sat down and figured out how to approach it. But we had the idea and were playing it at shows when we were playing that first record. D: “We worked really hard in that seven years. I’m naturally a bit of pessimistic person, so I’d feel it was a struggle but you’re just compelled to keep going and we kept doing it. We didn’t really play live – we didn’t really want to because I just didn’t fancy slogging it out.” K: “Yeah we didn’t play live like a band, so we’d do one-offs, acoustic things.” The Heavy The Heavy: “I put myself through some sort of emotional distress, for the art. So we don’t write the happiest of songs!” So you saw it more like a studio project? D: “That’s exactly what it was.” Tell us more about your songwriting process, in terms of lyrics, melody, etc and your roles in the band? K: “For me, I place myself firmly in the fire. I’ll go until I’m pretty much done, step out of the fire and then extract what I’ve been feeling whilst going through the heat. I tend to get a lot of material from that. I put myself through some sort of emotional distress, for the art. So we don’t write the happiest of songs!” D: “I have a bit of a routine. I decided to try to sit down and write songs from scratch on an acoustic guitar. If it worked at that level, I had the vision of our production and with Kelv singing, and how it could work. I could almost see the completed thing. But it’ll take me a while to get that finished song.” Do you like to lock yourself away or do you feed off other people in the room? D: “With this record it was different, because our circumstances have changed a lot with families and all of that sort of business, so we definitely worked more apart on this. I’d built a little studio at the end of my garden and went down there. I’d come up with about 10 or 12 songs with words and music, from the bottom to the top, and then we’d go in and give it to Kelv. If he was into it, he’d get his head around it and take it in with Chris and Spence and work out how we’d play it.” How else is this new album different from your previous releases? K: “I think we’ve become a really kick-ass band, so with this record we really wanted to capture that, and to take it back to that time. So the plan was to try to evoke the sound of 1968 and bring out influences in ESG, The Kinks and a ton of punk as well.” D: “And also Quincy Jones. We worked on it for about three years, but there were a couple of false starts.” What went wrong? D: “Well the hardest thing initially is to find a space to do it, to leave our stuff and work. The songs were there, but we needed a proper studio. K: “And you need a space where you can play the songs over and over and over…” D: “But we couldn’t find that space, and then when we did, that’s when the penny dropped. We recorded it at The Distillery, just outside Bath, which is a friend’s private studio – it’s the most amazing space. We were fortunate enough to get an invite and it’s 10 minutes away from home. So it made the whole thing joyous and probably too easy, because we got too comfortable and it took too long.” Was that because the pressure was off a bit? D: “No, I think there was more pressure than ever before, because we want to carry on doing it. And we’ve also got families now and you’re a working musician and this is for real now. I’m not qualified to do anything else! So if this doesn’t work for us, are we going to go back to The Gap?” K: “No we are not going back to The Gap! I’m going Old Navy!” Interview: Aaron Slater

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Red Light Management
Scoop.it!

Album reviews: Charles Bradley, Milwaukee Banks, Alison MacCallum and more

Album reviews: Charles Bradley, Milwaukee Banks, Alison MacCallum and more | The Heavy | Scoop.it

The Heavy may be left with difficult questions (What Happened to the Love?) and a confronting amount of loss (Nobody's Hero), but "victim" is not part of their vocabulary. Rather, the Bath quartet choose to attack the hurt head-on, fighting tooth and nail through catharsis of the first order. You'd be forgiven for thinking it sounds like a difficult road, but vibrant brass blasts, crunchy guitars and an almost overwhelming amount of groove mean you're more likely to dance than cry. Standout track The Apology channels Memphis soul, while Tom Waits-inspired vaudeville underpins A Ghost You Can't Forget. Goodbye Baby closes the album with gentle, bluesy surrender, a welcome relief after the high-octane emotions of the previous tracks. These are big tunes, attempting to encompass even bigger feelings; and while the injured party is obvious, it's more difficult to tell who the merciless ones are here. Is it the Heavy, with their hook-laden, rhythm-driven, rock'n'roll-garage-soul? Or is it the loved ones who hurt them, whether by divorce, death, or breakdown? It's a question the band don't entirely answer. One thing however, is clear: the Heavy may be down, but they're not out. JESSIE CUNNIFFE

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Red Light Management
Scoop.it!

Hurt & the Merciless – The Heavy | Alex Donald | 2 March 2016

Hurt & the Merciless – The Heavy | Alex Donald | 2 March 2016 | The Heavy | Scoop.it

The Heavy, the band that sound like they’re from New Orleans but are in fact from Bath, the band beloved of music supervisors everywhere, release their fourth studio album Hurt & the Merciless on 1st April 2016. Irish people might be familiar with their track ‘What Makes A Good Man’ from the Guinness ad, ‘Sapeurs’, which brilliantly depicts La Sape, the elegant dandies of Congo. ‘Since You Been Gone’ is the first single and the black and white video tells the story of a couple having a fight. (As a rather long aside, my jukebox brain tends to associate certain words or phrases with songs, like when I first downloaded the Hailo app and got the Foo Fighters’ song ‘Halo’ stuck in my head every time I used it. The title ‘Since You Been Gone’ has reminded me of the Kelly Clarkson pop hit, but I’m hopeful that repeated listenings to The Heavy will knock that on the head.) I prefer the recent single ‘Turn Up’, which will be a stormer live and no doubt the soundtrack to TV shows in the near future. It has no official video yet but here’s the lyric placeholder. So far, the two lead singles don’t indicate new territory for the band, but I’m still interested to hear the album. And when the vibe is this good, there’s something to be said for not fixing what’s not broken, right?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Red Light Management
Scoop.it!

ALBUM: The Heavy 'Hurt & The Merciless' | Gigslutz | 29 March 2016

ALBUM: The Heavy 'Hurt & The Merciless' | Gigslutz | 29 March 2016 | The Heavy | Scoop.it

Bath quartet The Heavy returns after nearly four years to follow-up their 2012 album The Glorious Dead with the release their fourth studio album, Hurt & The Merciless. Opener ‘Since You Been Gone’ is a funky number with a rousing beat throughout, and a tasty guitar riff alongside Kelvin Swaby’s soulful vocal sets the bar very high. The opening horns sound familiar but add to the vibe, alongside the gospel backing vocals that come in as the track crescendos with the chant “the rain-drops won’t stop falling… from my eyes”. Dark but moving, and by the time ‘What Happened To The Love?’ kicks in my tail-feather is shaking. Again, there is familiarity to the sound with the deep-south inspired backing vocals reminding of The Black Crowes (‘Southern Harmony’) and Stereophonics (‘Madame Helga’). Great stuff all the same! ‘The Apology’ is a highpoint, literally, with a falsetto vocal over a hypnotic groove as the band funk-out, think James Brown on speed. ‘Nobody’s Hero’ slams the brakes on as the pace slows to near standstill. Thankfully, ‘Miss California’ follows and with its haunting lyrics “your ballroom days are over, it’s getting hard to hide” combined with a western sound and death march ending is one of the standout tracks on the album. With The Heavy well known for contributions to both TV and film, this outstanding track seems destined for a future soundtrack and would be a perfect fit should Tarantino ever decide to explore the dark world of beauty pageants. ‘Slave To Your Love’ is another highpoint with Kelvin’s vocal feeding off guitarist Dan Taylor’s dynamic sound with drummer Chris Ellul and bassist Spencer Page’s groove reminiscent of early Red Hot Chili Peppers. With a forthcoming tour and two appearances at California’s Coachella festival in the diary, 2016 could be the year The Heavy achieve mainstream success. Hurt & The Merciless is released on 1st April via Counter Records.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Red Light Management
Scoop.it!

Chronique album : The Heavy - Hurt And The Merciless [Translation] | Sound of Violence | 25 March 2016

Chronique album : The Heavy - Hurt And The Merciless [Translation] | Sound of Violence | 25 March 2016 | The Heavy | Scoop.it

Nearly four years after the release of The Glorious Dead , The Heavy resurface with a fourth album recorded in Bath - their hometown, and parts of which have even been recorded in the garden of their drummer! - And they themselves have produced. The sauce taking well over the three previous records, Hurt & The Merciless contains the same ingredients to provide a more than satisfactory result. As usual, The Heavy deliver a dynamic opus, which does not stop once the past forty five minutes. Between incendiary rock'n'roll ( Since You've Been Gone, Slave To Your Love ), funky blues ( Not The One, Mean Ol 'Man ) and decadent soul ( Turn Up, The Apology and catchy female voices), Hurt & the Merciless portrays perfectly the various and varied style of English training. Recalling continually other groups by their musical richness, beach traveling in beach, from a rock blues rock atmosphere of the seventies. Can be heard on What Happened To The Love? Sonorities King Khan mixed with the guitar of The Hives while later Screamin 'Jay Hawkins just hovering above A Ghost You Can not Forget . The succession of Nobody's Hero and Miss California serves explosive break in the heart of the disc, the first with his orchestral instrumentation decorated with one of the most immediate choruses of the Heavy, the second vintage atmosphere and melancholy, allowing himself a short trumpet solo striking. in Finally, the compositions of this Hurt & the Merciless is musically rich, not hesitating to invite on the same track violin, trumpet and keyboard in addition to the group of rock instruments. While resting on a winning formula, The Heavy manage to reinvent themselves by further expanding their sonic palette and offering some titles more rock'n'roll laid in a case of the most successful.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Red Light Management
Scoop.it!

The Heavy - Hurt & The Merciless Review | Culturefly | 3 April 2016

The Heavy - Hurt & The Merciless Review | Culturefly | 3 April 2016 | The Heavy | Scoop.it

Best known for their 2009 hit How You Like Me Now?, Bath-based quartet The Heavy return with their strongest album to date, in the form of Hurt & the Merciless. Though the band’s eclectic range of influences is well known, none could have expected the perfected blend of blues rock, neo-soul and classic pop sounds that appears on this triumphant fourth LP. The instrumentalists’ superb collective skill and frontman Kelvin Swaby’s knack for killer hooks and affecting lyricism make this simultaneously a musician’s album and a great pop record. Crashing in with almighty force comes album opener Since You Been Gone. Its powerful brass accompaniment and reliance on bass-heavy grooves could easily send inattentive listeners back to the height of funk and soul in the 1960s and ‘70s were it not for the band’s dramatic urgency keeping them rooted in the here and now. There are hints of Marvin Gaye and James Brown dotted throughout the record, and yet the high tempo, slick production (their own) and sheer instrumental ambition is what makes Hurt & the Merciless a record with its eyes looking decidedly forwards. Each instrumentalist has his moment to shine on the record, from the groovy bass of The Apology to the mighty drum fills used sparingly and yet to thrilling effect on Last Confession. Meanwhile some fine guitar work can be found throughout the record, as axe man Dan Taylor fires home some piercing riffs and dirty licks without ever overwhelming the album’s distinctly soul-orientated aesthetic. This presence is most valuable on penultimate track Slave to Your Love, as The Heavy return to the hard rock sound of their earlier work, and in the process channel the forceful energy of Black Sabbath and Led Zeppelin. Vocalist Kelvin Swaby performs a crucial role in conveying the band’s throwback style, both in his controlled, intensely masculine performances and the highly narrative-driven nature of his lyrics. Frequently Swaby paints himself as the pantomime soul villain, the jealous and paranoid lover of pop music of old. On Last Confession he admits to being ‘a cheat, a liar, a son of a gun’, whilst Nobody’s Hero has him display touching emotional tenderness as he laments ‘I’m nobody’s champion’. The boisterous, expansive sound of the band contrasts beautifully with Swaby’s intimately personal poetry. Elsewhere the record proves itself to be a cinematic experience full of tragedy and melodrama. ‘Don’t call me baby, that’s not my name’ snaps Swaby, as a dark tone fuses with the band’s blues rock essence, recalling the more sinister works of Jack White and The Black Keys. What Happened to the Love? is equally downbeat in its tone (if not its pace), whilst Miss California is a prime example of the singer’s storytelling prowess, as he relates the tale of a fallen beauty queen who ‘don’t turn their heads no more’. Terrifically playful, and yet equally an emotive and personal record, Hurt & the Merciless is a thriller from start to finish. The Heavy went into this with guns blazing, and have emerged with one of the most exhilarating rhythm and blues records of recent years. Music enthusiasts will cower at its technical complexity, whilst the casual listener with surely be entranced by its unrelenting pace and seductive hooks.

more...
No comment yet.