The Great Depression_Wright
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The Great Depression_Wright
To communicate pieces of infomation about the great depression
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The Great Depression, Introduction

The Great Depression, Introduction | The Great Depression_Wright | Scoop.it

The Great Depression was a time of hardship for people across most of the world. The Wall Street Crash which occurred in October 1929 was the beginning of a severe depression. Even before the Crash the unemployment rate for Australia was 10% after the crash, it doubled than in 1932 it reached a peak of 32%.

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Women and Fashion during the depression

Women and Fashion during the depression | The Great Depression_Wright | Scoop.it

The Great Depression changed the family in several ways. Many couples delayed marriage, and divorce rates and birth rates dropped. A 1940 poll revealed that 1.5 million married women were abandoned by their husbands. During the Great Depression most women were the first to loss their jobs the returned to their homes to support their families and take care of their husbands. In the case of my family, women returned home to take care of what little farming there was.

 

A new look in women’s fashion emerged in the 1930s. Due to the economic crisis, designers were forced to make more affordable fashions with longer hemlines, slim waistlines, lower heels, and less makeup. Accessories became more important as they created the impression of a “new” look without having to buy a new dress.

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The Wall Street Crash

The Wall Street Crash of 1929 was the main causes of the Great Depression. “Black Thursday, Mondayand Black Tuesday” are terms to describe the Crash. The initial crash occurred over several days, with Tuesday being the most devastating.

The stock market crash in 1929 was the most devastating crash in the history of the United States

On “Black Tuesday,” October 29, 1929, the market lost $14 billion, making the loss for that week an astonishing $30 billion. This was ten times more than the annual federal budget and so much more than the U.S. had spent during WWI. Thirty billion dollars would be equivalent to $377,587,032,770.41 today. After the initial crash, there was a wave of suicides in the New York’s financial district.

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Kate Pill's comment, March 19, 2012 8:23 AM
Very interesting! I have two questions:
1) Is this in your own words?
2) Where is the link to the Australian experience?

This is worth keeping, you just need to address the two questions I have asked.
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Unemployment Statistics

Unemployment Statistics | The Great Depression_Wright | Scoop.it

This graph shows the percentage of unemployment due to The Great Depression across all the countries effected. It shows that people had no money, so no one spent any money and it was a dangerous never ending circle.

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Kate Pill's comment, March 19, 2012 7:53 AM
An interesting graph. You don't appear to have completed the sentence! Turn this sentence into two sentences and add some analysis. Hint: What do the extreme figures between 1932 and 1936 tell us about how severe the depression was for people?
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Hoover

Hoover | The Great Depression_Wright | Scoop.it

Herbert Hoover (1874-1964), a Republican, was president of America when the Great Depression began. He declared in March 1930 that the U.S. had “passed the worst” and said that the economy would sort itself out. But the worst had just begun and would last until the begining WWII (1939).

People who lost their homes often lived in what were called “Hoovervilles,” or shanty towns, that were named after President Herbert Hoover. There was also “Hoover Stew” (food dished out in soup kitchens), “Hoover Blankets” (newspapers that served as blankets), “Hoover Hogs” (jack rabbits used as food), and “Hoover Wagons” (broken cars that were pulled by mules).

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Bibliography

50 interestion facts about the Great Depression n.d., , accessed 17th March 2012, http://facts.randomhistory.com/2009/04/12_great-depression.html.

 

The Great Depression 1st October 2009, , accessed 14th March 2012, http://australia.gov.au/about-australia/australian-story/great-depression.

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