The Great Depression, Migliaccio
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The Great Depression, Migliaccio
This is my year 10 research project for my school on the Great Depression.
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Introduction to the Great Depression

The Great Depression began in 1929 because of the New York Stock Market crashing. The Great Depression lasted until the Second World War. People all over the world were unemployed and lost their jobs because of this crash on Wall Street in 1929. "'Black Thursday', which was the 24th of October, 1929 is remembered as the day that the economic bubble burst, sending the world into a long depression."

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Youtube clip about the Great Depression

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VpKmfjf5tUk

This video is about the Great Depression. The video mainly talks about Americans in the Great Depression. It shows statistics of unemployment, suicides, repossesion of land and the general impact of the Great Depression to the people. It then goes on to show pictures of the people and land. This Youtube clip links to some other sources as it shows statistics of unemployment and tells us a little bit about family life. This Youtube link can relate to Australia during this time because it relates to the kinds of experiences and events that Australians were going through.

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Kate Pill's comment, March 19, 2012 7:33 AM
Good - But answer this question: Why is it helpful? OR this question: How does it link to (support) one of your other sources? :)
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Unemployment in the Great Depression

Unemployment was the worst event caused by the Great Depression. People lost their jobs, which caused them to spend less money and therefore making the businesses decline, which made more people unemployed. By 1932, Australian unemployment was 35%, American unemployment was 25% and unemployment in Germany unemployment was 40%. All of these figures proved that the Great Depression was worldwide, and affected everybody.

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Kate Pill's comment, March 19, 2012 7:35 AM
Do these figures prove that the Great Depression was worldwide?
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Women and the Great Depression

Women and the Great Depression | The Great Depression, Migliaccio | Scoop.it

Before the Great Depression began, it was thought they shouldn't work when they were married. It was thought that working was the man's job. But in the Great Depression, the women started to get employed where possible, making their role on life more important. Women started working because the men lost their jobs, so the women looked for employment to support their families. Later, this enhanced the women's voice and freedom of speech in domestic decisions.

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Kate Pill's comment, March 19, 2012 7:33 AM
Excellent
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Phar Lap in the Great Depression

Phar Lap in the Great Depression | The Great Depression, Migliaccio | Scoop.it

http://dl.nfsa.gov.au/module/346/

Phar Lap was an extremely important, high profile sporting hero during the Great Depression. He was bred in New Zealand. In the video, it talks about how he was so important, and how much everybody loved him and looked up to him during the Great Depression. Phar Lap helped to unite the nation during the hard times of the Great Depression, and helped many people get through because he was an icon of perseverance and high achievement. He was the one thing that could make everybody happy during the Great Depression, and he was something that everybody could believe in. Phar Lap was known as "Big Red", "Bobby" or "The Red Terror"as he was a huge chestnut horse, standing at 17.1 hands high. He was bought cheap, and didn't do too well in his first few races. But within a few months, everything started turning around and he started winning. He won 37 races out of 51 starts. Because Phar Lap was so brilliant, he was sent to America and won the Agua Caliente. While he was in America, Phar Lap died. People believed he was poisoned by the Americans, but research suggests that he died from a viral infection. After his death, Australians grieved and wrote condolence letters to Phar Lap's trainer, Tommy Woodcock, expressing their sympathy. Phar Lap was like their family. "Big Red" was such a big influence on the nation during the Great Depression, and still is a treasured sporting hero. Phar Lap's hide is in the Melbourne Museum, his skeleton is in New Zealand and his massive heart (weighing 6.35 kg) is in Canberra.

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Statistics of unemployment throughout the Great Depression

Statistics of unemployment throughout the Great Depression | The Great Depression, Migliaccio | Scoop.it
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Family Life and the Great Depression

Family Life and the Great Depression | The Great Depression, Migliaccio | Scoop.it

During the Great Depression, many children left school to support their families. Children, girls and boys, from ages 10-18 worked in factories, canneries, farms and mines. When the families weren't working, they tried to have as much fun as possible. They played games with neighbors, friends and relatives, playing board games such as 'Scrabble' and card games, because they had little or no money to spend on entertainment. Sports such as cricket were popular in Australia.

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Bibliography

Australian Government. (2009). The Great Depression: Unemployment in
Australia. Available:
http://australia.gov.au/about-australia/australian-story/great-depression. Last
accessed 14th March 2012.

 

Australian History.org. (2012). Australian History: The Great Depression.
Available: http://www.australianhistory.org/great-depression. Last accessed 16th
March 2012.

 

The Ganzel Group. (2003). Having Fun - Family Time. Available:
http://www.livinghistoryfarm.org/farminginthe30s/life_20.html. Last accessed
14th March 2012.

 

Ibis Communications. (2000). The Great Depression. Available:
http://www.eyewitnesstohistory.com/snprelief1.htm. Last accessed 14th March 2012.

 

Life During the Great Depression. Available:
http://www.allabouthistory.org/life-during-the-great-depression.htm. Last
accessed 14th March 2012.

 

 

 NFSA. (2006). Phar Lap's Hide. Available:
http://dl.nfsa.gov.au/module/346/. Last accessed 16th March 2012.

 

 

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Kate Pill's comment, March 19, 2012 7:34 AM
Good choice of sources! No wikipedia :)