The Great Depression Ellul
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The Great Depression Ellul
This is my Year 10 Research Project for The Great Depression
Curated by Ashleigh Ellul
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Introduction to the Great Depression

Introduction to the Great Depression | The Great Depression Ellul | Scoop.it

The Great Depression was a massive financial crash that effected both industrialised and exporting countries. Major places such as Europe, America, Australia, Canada and United Kingdom were all sent into turmoil as government taxes, prices, profits, income and international trade all dropped. This began in 1929 and continued for ten years until finally settling down in 1939. It was the longest and most distressing depression the Western world had ever experienced.

The picture above shows many unemplyed Australian men marching the streets of Perth, Western Australia to see the Premier Sir james Mitchell.

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Women in The Great Depression

Women in The Great Depression | The Great Depression Ellul | Scoop.it

Women were definitely the backbone of the Great Depression, keeping their families together and looked after. As husbands went off to work, usually for short hours and less pay, women did what they could to provide for their families. Many left their jobs, turning to unpaid domestic work in their own homes. Many pick pocketed, taking what they can and making do with what they had. Others planted gardens to help save on food. Buying day old bread, resewing split sheets, cutting up adult clothing to fit children and renting smaller apartments or moving in with family were all was women helped contribute to their family’s sustainability.
As the depression grew, many women lost their husbands as they went away looking for work or simply because they had deserted them. This left many single mothers fending for themselves and their children.

The picture above shows a women and her children putting up with the struggles of The Great Depression.

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Unemployment During The Great Depression

Unemployment During The Great Depression | The Great Depression Ellul | Scoop.it

As The Great Depression progressed, more pay was being cut, money was being lost and jobs were coming to an end. By 1933, a staggering 25% of the words population was unemployed. This means if the approximate population was 2 billion people, around 500 million people had no jobs. After the 1933 unemployment spike, rates seemed to go down. In 1937, unemployment rates hit below 15% which was the lowest the world had seen during The Great Depression since 1930. This didn’t last long as in the next year, rates jumped up again to around 18%.
Throughout the whole of The Great Depression, the unemployment rate sat at an average of about 15%.

The graph above shows the worldwide unemployment percentage by its year.

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Children and Families during The Great Depression

Harris Smart plays music recalling the Depression times of the 1930s in Australia.

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Stories of The Great Depression

Told by five American adults who lived through it as children, this video gives a brief insite to what life during The Great Depression was like.

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Inventions from the Great Depression

Inventions from the Great Depression | The Great Depression Ellul | Scoop.it

Although the Great Depression was a stressful time for everyone, many useful inventions came out of it.

- In 1910, Jacob Schick drew up designs for the world’s first the electric dry razor after he was fed up of lathering up to shave in the freezing cold. By 1929, his razors were on the shelves. This is how the company we know today as ‘Schick’ came about.

- The car radio was invented by Paul and Joseph Galvin who needed a new revenue after the financial crash. Designs were drawn in 1930 and by 1933, Ford were manufacturing cars to include radios. Later on, the brothers changed their name from Galvin Manufacturers to Motorola, the company we know today.

- Michael Cullen envisioned a giant store that would draw in customers with its variety and discounts. In 1930, he opened the words first supermarket. Today, King Kullen Supermarkets are still found in America today.

- In 1931, Dr Earle Cleveland Haas noticed the discomfort women experienced by using pads and in 1932, the first cotton tampon was put in stores.

- Chocolate chip cookies evolved in 1933 after Ruth Wakefield ran out of bakers chocolate and decided to cut up a chocolate bar instead, resulting in choc chips. Soon, Nestle bought her recipe. This is how Nestle choc-chip cookies we still have today came about.

- After J.F. Cantrell noticed that only wealthy people and those that had electricity available could use powered washing machines, he opened the world’s first Laundromat. In 1934, he charged people by the hour to use his four washing machines.

- The game Monopoly was invented in 1935 after Charles Darrow decided to give people something to be entertained with after all the sadness the depression caused.

- Finally, in 1938, Chester Carlson became fed up with the way labs processed hand-copied drawings. After years of designs, in 1959 the world’s first automatic copier was released, resulting in the photo copier we have today.

 

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Kate Pill's comment, March 19, 2012 8:01 AM
Very interesting! Have you thought about placing dot-points in front of each point so that it is easier for the viewer to read? Did you mean "used pads" or "usig pads"? Excellent points :)
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Family life in The Great Depression

Family life in The Great Depression | The Great Depression Ellul | Scoop.it

Without knowing exactly how family life was during The Great Depression without experiencing it for yourself, you can tell that it wouldn't have been easy.

Money was scarce, and families had to make do with what they already had and began saving for necessities. Many lost their jobs and were struggling to pay for the daily upkeep of their families and in many cases, this resulted in homelessness.

Family time together was treasured but as budget was tight, families made fun without spending money. Things such as board games, puzzles and sport were common. Some even listened to the radio if they were lucky enough to have one.

Sticking together was the golden rule of The Great Depression, and when you saw a neighbour struggling you would do your best to help. It was a very family orientated time in our history.

The picture above shows a typical family and their living conditions during The Great Depression.

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