The Great Depression - Bristow
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The Great Depression - Bristow
This is my research task on The Great Deression and its effects on the economy
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Most Tragic Event - The Great Depression

Most Tragic Event - The Great Depression | The Great Depression - Bristow | Scoop.it

The Great epression Started in 1929 it was the most tragic event the world had ever seen. No one has figured out the reasons of the depression other than the facts that it was really bad. Tuesday October 29, 1929 was the day which is now called ‘Black Saturday’, where the stock market crashed nationwide. In total there was a loss of $14 billion dollars. Nobody knew what to do; no one was ready for something like this to happen. Most banks closed down, people ran to get their money out the bank. There for the country was headed for a very deep depression and nothing could stop it.

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Having Fun – Family Life during the Great Depression

Having Fun – Family Life during the Great Depression | The Great Depression - Bristow | Scoop.it

Family life during The Great Depression would have been harder then anyone in our time could imagine.

The family’s money was limited so they had to make do with what they had and save it for the things that they really needed, not just spend it on things they wanted. The income was becoming less and less every week which left some families becoming homeless because of money and job loss.

While families weren’t working they still found time to have fun with neighbours, friends, relatives or each other. They had little money to spend on entertainment so families used board games, sport and listening to the radio if you were fortunate to have one. The children liked to play music on a record and dance while their parents played card games with the neighbours.

 

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Women In The Work Place - The Great Depression

Women In The Work Place - The Great Depression | The Great Depression - Bristow | Scoop.it

This is a photo of a lady during The Great Depression.

She has been forced to go out and find work because her husband has lost his job and hasn't got another one yet. If she did not find this job her family would not be able to survive. If women couldn't find a job like this one the home labour increased and became more hard work as the household budgets were lowered.

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Kate Pill's comment, March 24, 2012 9:41 AM


Kate Pill (Today, 12:11 AM):
I understand what you are trying to communicate. The last sentence needed to be a little clearer. Next time, try reading your work out loud so that you can "hear" what the expression sounds like. Nevertheless, an effective picture and explanation that adds to the overall message of your scoop.it. :)
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The Sydney Harbour Bridge - The Great Depression

The Sydney Harbour Bridge - The Great Depression | The Great Depression - Bristow | Scoop.it

The Sydney Harbour Bridge is a fantastic landmark of Australia. It began in April 1923, which kept many Australians employed during the Depression until it’s opening
in 1932; it was officially opened on 19 March 1932. It was the Labor premier of New South Wales Jack Lang who was to open the bridge by cutting the ribbon, although Colonel Francis De Groot of Labor opposition who intervened on horseback by slashing the ribbon with his sword.

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Kate Pill's comment, March 24, 2012 9:39 AM
Yes, this bridge was indeed responsible for the livelihood of many Australians. One of many reasons for its icon status.
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2012- 2013 The next Great Depression?

Is 2012 or 2013 about to become the next Great Depression?

The Econmic indicators have shown that the economy is heading into a possible Depression. From the out of control debt, dropping tax income and high unemployment will force country’s to either cut entitlement benefits or print money and rise hyperinflation. Either way hard times are coming and those on fixed incomes
will suffer the worst. Economic crumple is possible as the conditions become unbalanced across the globe.

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Kate Pill's comment, March 20, 2012 12:41 AM
Interesting points. The year 1013? ! :) Don't forget topay attention to the editing process.
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Unemployment Statistics In The Great Depression

Unemployment Statistics In The Great Depression | The Great Depression - Bristow | Scoop.it

These statistics show the lowest amount of unemployment right up to the highest part of unemployment. It only really started to shake up with the Wall Street Crash and continued to deteriorate from then on. The full employment didn't return until the war broke out in the 1940's. Although to put the unemployment rates into perspective the next highest rate ever recorded after 1940 was 9.7% in 1982.

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Kate Pill's comment, March 24, 2012 9:37 AM
Some interesting figures that communicate the severity of the Great Depression. However, these are American figures. You can use an American source but you needed to link it to the Australian experience :) The cut-off date for submission of this task has passed so you are not allowed to adjust this scoop.
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Children In The Great Depression

Children In The Great Depression | The Great Depression - Bristow | Scoop.it

Yes, the Depression was hard for adults but they were not the only ones affected. Children took a toll with the loss of money as well. 20% of children were hungry and without proper clothing, in some coal mining regions the percentage was much higher and because of the loss of money children went without shoes and warm clothes for the winter. Thousands of schools closed down because they lacked the money to stay open. About 3 million children between 7 and 17 had to leave school and 40% of young people from age 16 to 24 were neither in school or working. In result about 250,000 young people were homeless in the early years of the Depression and many became nomads, travelling the highways and railways. These figures were the average for Australian and American children.

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Kate Pill's comment, March 19, 2012 8:18 AM
Good! Are these Australian or American figures? You need to clearly include this information in yor scoop. If American, make a link to the Australian experience. :)
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Bibliography - The Great Depression

The University of North Carolina Press. (1922-2012). How The Depression Affected Children. Available:
http://newdeal.feri.org/eleanor/er2a.htm. Last accessed 14th March 2012.

 

Shmoop University. (2012). The Great Depression Statistics. Available:
http://www.shmoop.com/great-depression/statistics.html. Last accessed 14th
March 2012.

 

N/A. (N/A). Effects on Women. Available:
http://www.library.csi.cuny.edu/dept/history/lavender/286/14_files/frame.htm.
Last accessed 14th March 2012.

 

Claudia Reinhardt and Bill Ganzel. (2003). Having Fun - Family Time. Available:
http://www.livinghistoryfarm.org/farminginthe30s/life_20.html. Last accessed
14th March 2012.

 

Matthew Brown. (N/A). The Great Depression. Available: http://home.jps.net/~gailhd/crossing/esperanza/greatdep.htm.
Last accessed 14th March 2012.

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Kate Pill's comment, March 24, 2012 9:38 AM
A good variety of sources.