The Government's Children: A New Example for American Parents
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Foster Care: We Need Help

Foster Care: We Need Help | The Government's Children: A New Example for American Parents | Scoop.it
Sally Schofield, the foster mother of Logan Marr, was found guilty June 25 of wrapping the 5-year-old's body with 42 feet of duct tape during a "timeout," causing the little girl to suffocate.
Schofield could face up to 40 years in prison for the child's death.
"The child-welfare system failed...
Audrey K's insight:

This article is about the problems in foster care and its inability to keep its children in proper homes. It addresses the issues of children being beaten, killed, frequently transported, taken away from siblings, and not responded to when asking for help. There are many more thorns in this article than there are golden ideas. The thorns are that parents are not being questioned enough about their backgrounds resulting in children entering unsafe homes. This is a big deal because it feeds our criminal jails with children brought up by our own government. I have learned from this article that there needs to be more awareness of foster care in different social areas. Those coming from more apparently stable homes need to be informed of the problems in the foster care system.

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What happens after foster care?

What happens after foster care? | The Government's Children: A New Example for American Parents | Scoop.it
Rita Soronen says about 24,000 children turn 18 years old each year and "age out" of foster care; most of them put out alone into the world without a lifeline.
Audrey K's insight:

I chose this piece because I thought it was especially interesting to focus on all the forces against children coming from the foster care system in their adult lives. It is upsetting to find out that even those who try extremely hard to move forward in life are often shut down by the system. I want to learn more about how we can help children from the foster care system after they are moved out? I would also like to research what things specifically put these children down. I have learned that for a foster care system to be sustainable we muse also look at the children after they leave the system and are put into adulthood. I also learned that no matter how hard a foster graduate works, they still are put down after leaving their foster homes.

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How to Report Child Abuse.

How to Report Child Abuse. | The Government's Children: A New Example for American Parents | Scoop.it
School abuse, child injuries, birth injuries, dog bites, foster care abuse, school injuries, shaken baby abuse, day care injuries, negligence, burns, clergy abuse , car accident, medical malpractice, personal injury and wrongful ...

Via Velvet Martin
Audrey K's insight:

Child abuse is reportedly becoming more and more prevalent. This article suggests that an expert child abuse lawyer is the best way to report child abuse. They help file criminal charges avoiding a civil case (which is supposedly much less successful). I was disturbed by the idea that children are being exploited and abused and people are very ignorant towards it. I would like to ask how we can inform people on the importance of sticking up for kids who appear to be abused. I also would like to know how we can tell people to look for signs of abuse.

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Changing the Expectations of Foster Care

Changing the Expectations of Foster Care | The Government's Children: A New Example for American Parents | Scoop.it
Victory for OK’s Abused Children: Deal Reached to Repair State’s Foster Care System — Children’s Rights...

Via Velvet Martin
Audrey K's insight:
The article is about the inappropriate regulations of the foster care and welfare system in Oklahoma. It speaks to the numerous abuse and death reports of children previously visited by child welfare representatives. I really appreciate the efforts that are being made to change the system such as focusing on the areas where children are treated the worst and making rules so that kids cannot be moved more than a certain number of times. The thorns in the article were the lack of structure and management in the welfare system. This relates directly to the foster care system because foster care children also need to be checked up on by representatives similar to the welfare system. I would like to hear more statistics on the abused children in the foster care system. I am also curious as to how the system hopes to improve in the next 10 years.
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Foster Care in Athens

Athens, Rome areas to test foster care privatization Online Athens ATLANTA | Clarke and surrounding counties are part of two regions that will test whether having someone other than the state oversee foster care improves the lives of children taken...
Audrey K's insight:

I am disturbed by this articles intention to promote the privatization of foster care. Whether in Rome or the United States, it is unacceptable for the government to hand over the responsibility of its minor citizens to a charity organization. Rather than worrying about being punished for its inability to take care of the children in foster care, the countries seeking privatization need to be thinking about how they can improve the system. There are few things in this article that I see as progress. Of these, the statement from DFCS Director Sharon Hill seems most promising; however, she fails to recognize that it is the governments job to make sure these children are protected.

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Will the Lack of Parents in Foster Care Result in Looser Rules?

Will the Lack of Parents in Foster Care Result in Looser Rules? | The Government's Children: A New Example for American Parents | Scoop.it
Snohomish Times
Northwest Adoption Exchange Addresses Foster and Adoptive Parent Shortage ...
Kirkland Views (blog)
Washington State is facing a critical shortage of licensed foster and adoptive parents.
Audrey K's insight:

There are many problems proposed in this article. First, children do not have homes and are stuck being moved from place to place for nearly two years before settling down and finding new homes. This is unacceptable. Encouraging people to adopt by saying “You don’t have to be perfect to be a perfect parent” is inappropriate. We cannot joke about the wellbeing of children living in homes of parents who are not qualified. If we wish to set an example, we need to spend more money hiring qualified people to take care of foster children. 

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Parents Have the Ability to do Their Part

Parents Have the Ability to do Their Part | The Government's Children: A New Example for American Parents | Scoop.it

 

When it comes to technological innovation, the United States remains number one. Yet, among 15-year-olds worldwide, the US ranks 29th in math literacy, falling behind Finland, Croatia, the Czech Republic, and Liechtenstein.[1] This means that the US delivers a less-than-excellent education in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM education). Due to the declining quality of public primary and secondary education as well as an overall lack of financial and societal support (only 10 percent of children's TV characters are scientists or engineers),[2] fewer young American students are showing an interest in STEM education.

 

Given that so many US students have shied away from STEM studies, American industry has been forced to continue its practice of outsourcing overseas. This business strategy will not change unless a sufficient number of American students pursue college and graduate degrees in the sciences. As of late, there has been renewed attention to STEM education as well initiatives and funding from the White House on its behalf.[3] To contribute to this new momentum, parents and caregivers can play a significant role in exciting their children about STEM education and its professional possibilities. What are the steps in taking this proactive approach? This article will help you to get your children more involved in STEM education and loving it, too.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Audrey K's insight:

This article focuses on the actions that parents can take when raising their children to better their children's' education. It focuses a lot on a couple key themes: children's health and wellness, understanding you children's abilities, building an educational relationship with your children, and exposing your children to science and technology whenever possible. Overall, the author really hopes for the parents to bring science and technology into the lives of their children and to become very familiar with their children's educational, emotional, and physical needs. In other words, the parents need to really understand what type of learner their child is and no matter what, they need to make sure that they get the scientific education that the children deserve. The only thing that really struck me about this article, is the problem that the parents are forced to do a lot of the teachers' work. It is the teachers' job to make sure that each child in their classroom is taught in the best way that will benefit their learning. Rather than telling the parents what they should be doing, the teachers should be receiving this information. In fact, those in charge of creating school curriculums should be the ones to insist on these standards being met inside school. After reading this article, I am curious as to how we can bring this attitude into our schools. Also, what about the children of parents who are less dedicated or the children who have no parents at all? It is our responsibility as a community to support all children no matter what background because the wellbeing and education of the children will determine the strength of the community in the future.

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A Success Story

A Success Story | The Government's Children: A New Example for American Parents | Scoop.it
Kimberly Armstrong looked nervous as she approached the stage at the University of San Francisco, about to get her diploma as a Law School graduate. She had good reason to be overwhelmed with the depth of her accomplishment. More than half of the foster kids in California don’t even finish high school.
Audrey K's insight:

This article is about an incredible foster care success story. Kimberly Armstrong, the main subject, speaks to her struggles making it through her child life with her brothers. The golden ideas here are that it is possible for children put through the foster care system without the possibility of higher education. I also think that it is amazing that this takes place in our own bay area. The thorns from this article are the struggles that Armstrong faced as a child with her siblings. She proved that it is possible to break through the system with success.

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The Causes of Behavior

Audrey K's insight:

This study was really important for understanding what causes behavioral and maternal problems in youth in relation to poverty. The study was successful in linking maternal depression with poverty; however, it failed to find a connection between behavioral depression and capital. I would like to learn more about the quality of life for children in the foster care system in comparison to children living in low income houses. It would also be interesting to compare the types of households in which foster care youth are the happiest. Is it the homes that have the most money or children? Does it have something to do with their location?

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Foster Care Proving a Better Life for Abused Children

Foster Care Proving a Better Life for Abused Children | The Government's Children: A New Example for American Parents | Scoop.it
His past has challenged Justin Pelfrey most of his life, but he is now focused on the future thanks to the Montgomery Co. foster care system.
Audrey K's insight:

There are many things in this article that give me a new understanding of the benefits of the foster care system. First of all, the success Justin Pelfrey has had growing up in over four homes. His compliments towards all of his previous parents give me hope that the foster care system can do a good job choosing parents. The thorns in this article definitely had to do with Pelfrey's mother's abuse, his confusion about why she couldn't keep him, and the foster parents backing out of his adoption. Overall, I think this article shows the improvements of the system and the areas in which the foster care system needs more help. I would like to learn more about how Pelfrey got into cooking and what activities he was interested in while living with his foster parents. Are there activity requirements of foster care parents for their children? What are the standards/rules?

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Children's Union!

Children's Union! | The Government's Children: A New Example for American Parents | Scoop.it
The Providence Journal
Federal judge dismisses lawsuit against RI over foster care
The Providence Journal
PROVIDENCE, R.I.
Audrey K's insight:

I chose this piece because I am really interested in how we are supposed to stand up to the government and demand more for the children in our country. I currently know that things need to be changed so I like that this article speaks on the issue of foster care. I learned how we can stand up to unacceptable rules in the foster care system. Finally, children are bringing issues to court about their well being in the foster care system. There were a couple thorns that stuck out in this article: the kids were separated from their siblings, the parents did not have receive enough aid from the government to support the extra children.

 

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A Continuous Need for Parents

A Continuous Need for Parents | The Government's Children: A New Example for American Parents | Scoop.it
Need for foster parents stays steady
WCYB
Drew Porter, Unit Manager for the Embrace Sponsor Home program, said the program holds between 10 and 18 children in 11 approved homes.
Audrey K's insight:

This article mentions the importance of dedicated foster parents. There is a clear need for more parents all over the country and on top of that, we need parents willing to take one or more children into their homes to try and keep siblings together. Another pressing problem is finding homes for children with special needs. It is one thing to ask a family to take in a child but to ask them to take care of a child with special needs is a much larger request financially and emotionally. Services like Highlands Community Services, a service mentioned in the article, help find homes for children with special needs and give them therapy for their needs. It is not uncommon for children in the foster care system to need extra help emotionally for obvious reasons. This article stresses the importance of tending to these needs. According to the article, the most difficult children to find homes for are the teenagers. It is understandable that we try to push kids into homes and out of the system, but maybe we need to improve the system so that children can have a healthy and safe life living under the foster system. I liked this article for its blunt expression of concern towards helping children in the foster care system, but I am worried that there are not enough suggestions on what we can to do improve this.

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Why there are Less Children in Foster Care in Orange County

Orange County sees fewer children in foster care
The Daily Tar Heel
... children in the system, down from 51 teenage children in Feb. 2004.
Audrey K's insight:

This article speaks very highly of the improvements in foster care in Orange County. The system has been trying to locate family members of children in foster care to find them better and more reliable homes. This strikes me as a good thing but I am also worried about what will happen to the children once they are put into distant family members' homes. I think that this is a very good idea but we need to be careful about looking into the families of the children to make sure that they are going to safe homes. I still wonder how forcing a child upon a distant relative will help them find better homes.

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