The Global Classroom
38 views | +0 today
Follow
The Global Classroom
Finding ways for students to connect, collaborate, communicate & create
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jennifer Fenton 
Scoop.it!

The Global Classroom Project

The Global Classroom Project | The Global Classroom | Scoop.it
A place for students and teachers to share, learn, and collaborate on a global stage...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jennifer Fenton 
Scoop.it!

Teaching technology: we need a digital revolution in the classroom

Teaching technology: we need a digital revolution in the classroom | The Global Classroom | Scoop.it
Observer editorial: The government, in rewriting the schools syllabus, has a chance to make ours a nation truly in tune with the 21st century (Teaching technology: we need a digital revolution in the classroom http://t.co/T3VUoUi5...
more...
Erin Larcey's curator insight, December 8, 2013 12:19 PM

This article while a little harsh in my opinion, provides a good point in refernece  to technology and teachers. Some teachers do not understand how to use technology. As a student first hand, I will tell you it is very frustrating to watch a teacher struggle with the technology they are trying to use to teach a lesson. Students have the advantage of growing up with the technology. So to them the answer or how to use it, is fairly obvious. Many teachers do use their students as resources to help out with technology, which is a good idea. However technology is constantly evolving. Students fall behind quickly without proper exposure to the new versions of  programs, such as word or power point. And teachers sometimes struggle with learning these new technological developments. And without knowledge of how these new developments work, it makes it harder to support a global classroom. So this leaves the question, how do we as teachers stay up to date with new technological advances? And to what extent? Of course not every new step forward may entirely benefit a classroom. How do we differentiate between what is important and what is not? Perhaps there should be a rubric-like document that helps teachers determine whether or not a particular technological aspect is relevant to the classroom. Which in turn could help teachers and students alike focus on tuning those skills. We could also hold classes for everyone which would allow more technologically savy people to help the technologically challenged. In today's world knowledge of technology and how it works is crutial. It will not only help open up our classrooms to greater possibilities by opening communication with people around the world, but it will help our students as they enter a technologically advanced world.

Suggested by iEARN-USA
Scoop.it!

Connect All Schools

Connect All Schools | The Global Classroom | Scoop.it

“Help us connect all US schools with the world by 2016”

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jennifer Fenton 
Scoop.it!

9 Crowdsourced Ways To Create A Collaborative Multimedia Book | Edudemic

9 Crowdsourced Ways To Create A Collaborative Multimedia Book | Edudemic | The Global Classroom | Scoop.it

The power of the crowd then kicked in and sprung into action. Dozens of responses have been left for Kirsten and they’re all quite excellent. Best of all, they’re from educators and education professionals I trust. So, here’s the list of helpful tools from the LinkedIn crowd.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jennifer Fenton 
Scoop.it!

Introductions - Flat Classrooms

Introductions - Flat Classrooms | The Global Classroom | Scoop.it
Transforming learning through global collaboration. Main · About ... I am Julie Lindsay, co-founder of Flat Classroom, currently working at Beijing BISS International School in China as MYP Coordinator and E-Learning Coordinator.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jennifer Fenton 
Scoop.it!

Top Five Uses of Social Media in Education

Top Five Uses of Social Media in Education | The Global Classroom | Scoop.it
Teachers and students are realizing the importance of Social media and are increasingly embedding it in the education system.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jennifer Fenton 
Scoop.it!

A Global Hello - home

A Global Hello - home | The Global Classroom | Scoop.it

A simple project in which students of all ages can easily take part. Stop by and say hello!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jennifer Fenton 
Scoop.it!

Pierce Students Use Science to Tackle Real-World Problem

Pierce Students Use Science to Tackle Real-World Problem | The Global Classroom | Scoop.it
As part of the Disney Planet Challenge, a fourth-grade class at Pierce will be constructing a rain garden to address soil erosion along the Rouge River.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jennifer Fenton 
Scoop.it!

PYP - Flat Classrooms

PYP - Flat Classrooms | The Global Classroom | Scoop.it
The Primary Years Program in the IB. How might those of us in the PYP, using inquiry based learning, collaborate across the nations using any elements of web2…
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jennifer Fenton 
Scoop.it!

The power of Twitter

The power of Twitter | The Global Classroom | Scoop.it
How I became a convert to Twitter • The teaching and education community on Twitter is truly inspirational (RT @StrategicTrends: The teaching and education community on #Twitter is truly inspirational http://t.co/YNStkj7t...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jennifer Fenton 
Scoop.it!

Ten Sites Supporting Digital Classroom Collaboration In Project Based Learning

Ten Sites Supporting Digital Classroom Collaboration In Project Based Learning | The Global Classroom | Scoop.it
Welcome to the second in a series of PBL Mania Posts. For the next few weeks I am celebrating Project Based Learning by hosting a webinar at Edtech Leaders Online and giving a PBL session at the NI...
more...
Erin Larcey's curator insight, December 8, 2013 11:39 AM

Here I found an (outdated, but stil relevant) blog post about collaboration tools. This particular post has links for a webinar (since passed) for STEM educators. I find this an interesting tool for teachers showing, that not only does global classroms benefit students, but teachers as well. Collaborating with fellow educators can help expand our ideas on lesson plans, what techniques to use, how to get through to students who may not be understanding our current teaching techniques, ect. Now as far as collaboration tools are concerned, there is a great list. Students can have access to these sites for free (some come with a premium edition for added benefits such as security) but for the most part are safe. Google Docs would be the tool I am most familiar with on this list. As far as my experieces are concerned,  Google Docs has presented groups with the opportunities to work together without being in the same room. When working on papers or projects everyone is able to add to the discussion. It helps college students (at least) with workingaround their busy schedules. In my experiences, my fellow group members and I have very different schedules between work, classes, and social events. Not everyone is available at the same time. Collaborating on a site such as Google Docs is valuable in that it is available 24/7 so no matter what time it is one can edit or add to the discussion. The list also includes programs allowing students and teachers to communicate throughout the lesson, which is useful if you have shy or timid students who may not feel comfortable communicating infront of the whole class. The other benefit to consider is the ability for students to share their work when it is completed, with the rest of the class. Projecting it on a board or even making it accessable on a database (such as canvas) for other students could help save on resources such as paper or ink, which in turn with cut down on costs for such resources. Finally we must consider what this means for students who are unable to attend classes because of geographical issues (such as missing a bus or having no way to get to school, as well as inclement weather) . Having acess to such tools would allow students who can't, for what ever reason, make it to school. They would be able to tune in and observe the class and even add to the conversation from their home (as long as they have a computer or something of the sort at home). It could potentially help students who are motivated to do so from falling behind in class because they missed school one day.

Scooped by Jennifer Fenton 
Scoop.it!

daily edventures | Global Education: Collaborating for Greater Understanding – Canada

daily edventures | Global Education: Collaborating for Greater Understanding – Canada | The Global Classroom | Scoop.it
daily edventures | Global Education: Collaborating for Greater Understanding – Canada...
more...
Erin Larcey's curator insight, December 8, 2013 11:09 AM

I found this interview to be very interesting.I picked out two main topics that I found interesting in Ms. Browns' interview; pre-service teachers and budget. As far as pre-service teachers go, she says that they are not quite aware of the possibilites technology presents us with these days. Here I would have to agree with her. I thought about my every day use of techenology which lets face it, borders on excessive; I'm constantly checking emails or tweets, friends send me papers to edit, teachers send out homework assignments. We are constantly connected. And I must admit I've never really considered what this means for a classroom up until now. We could be connecting with classrooms (students and teachers) across the globe, sharring lesson plans, techniques, conversation about controversal issues-- points of view. People from different cultures collaborating to give students the best possible education is where I'm heading with this. Teachers from China could helps students from the US or Astralia understand concepts that might have previously been out of reach. Looking at anything from a different point of view we all know is valuable and can help teach compassion and understanding. The possibilities and lessons are endless! I'm excited by these thoughts and their implications for future classrooms. Now as far as budget goes, this is a question on everyones mind. How much will this cost us? Connecting to other parts of the globe could be costly right? Wrong! As Ms. Brown points out in her interview, its a matter of determination. We have many resources at our disposal such as skype and oovoo. These sites provide free ways to commmunicate from anywhere. What would we need? Internet connection, and proper equipment (computers, projectors, ect.). Right now theres a whole technological movement in classrooms to get them updates and outfitted with such devices. Most classrooms these days have computers and at least some type of projectors. More and more we are seeing smart boards enter the classroom. Now I know that not all schools are privileged enough to have such technology, but even companies such as Apple are making movements to donate what they can to classrooms. I've seen schools with iPad initiatives allowing every student to have access to iPads. So cost at this point, with the education of our students so valued by people everywhere, is redundant. Its no longer a question we have to ask. What the bigger question we need to ask is how do we help our students live up to such potential, and how do we get our teachers to start thinking outside the classroom. Because lets face it, some of the most valuable learning we do comes from outside those four walls.

Scooped by Jennifer Fenton 
Scoop.it!

Building Bridges to Tomorrow K-2 Pilot - Flat Classrooms

Building Bridges to Tomorrow K-2 Pilot - Flat Classrooms | The Global Classroom | Scoop.it
A group for teachers in the NEW K-2 Flat Classroom Project called 'Building Bridges to Tomorrow'. This is a pilot project.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jennifer Fenton 
Scoop.it!

The Global Education Collaborative - The Official Social Network of the Global Education Conference

The Global Education Collaborative - The Official Social Network of the Global Education Conference | The Global Classroom | Scoop.it
Join our online community for those interested in global education. Contribute by adding media, conversation, and collaborative projects.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jennifer Fenton 
Scoop.it!

'A Week in the Life...' Project

A Flat Classroom® Project for students of age 8-10 Applications are invited for the 2011-2012 school year starting in March 2012 'A Week in the Life...' New Teacher Guide 'A Week in the Life...'...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jennifer Fenton 
Scoop.it!

Flat Classroom Project: Perspective Detectives

Calling all teachers and students from around the world: join together to exchange your perspective about what you teach and have been taught about events, figures and time periods in history.
more...
No comment yet.