The Giving Tree - Caring for Natural Things in Our Immediate Environment
34 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Jay
Scoop.it!

Junior Landcare Challenges « Junior Landcare

Junior Landcare Challenges « Junior Landcare | The Giving Tree - Caring for Natural Things in Our Immediate Environment | Scoop.it
Junior Landcare is about encouraging young people to play an active role in ensuring the safe future of their environment.
Jay's insight:

The Yates Junior Landcare is an offshoot of Landcare Australia, a conservation organisation. The challenges on the website provide fun and interactive ways for students to get involved with their natural environment and related conservation projects. 

 

This year for example, the Winter Veggie Growing Challenge can be entered by schools and classes. A hands-on experience like growing their own choice of vegetable is an effective way to encourage interest in the natural environment through inquiry based learning whereby the student is given a "role in directing their own learning and in planning and carrying out investigations, providing them with opportunities to express and reflect on their opinions, beliefs, values and questions appropriately" (ACARA, 2012). The challenge resources webpage includes tips and games that are readily accessible to the students even once they leave the classroom. This will give them the opportunity to further their investigations about the environment at home in the future.

 

For Early Stage 1 students, the assessment criteria for ENS1 outcome will include: a) "demonstrating ways in which they can care for their home, classroom, school and local community" as they learn about Landcare and become a part of it and, b) "using a variety of senses to gather information about their environment" (NSW BoS, 2006) such as tasting and smelling the vegetables. The students also have the chance to develop their literacy and technology skills as the challenge asks for a photo and a short story about their garden to be uploaded as part of the judgement criteria. The teacher can then analyse these submissions for assessment.  

 

References:

 

Draft F-12 Australian Curriculum: Geography, ACARA (2012). Retrieved from (12th of April, 2014): http://www.acara.edu.au/verve/_resources/2._Draft_F12_Australian_Curriculum_-_Geography.pdf 

 

NSW Board of Studies (2006), HSIE K-6 Syllabus. Retrieved from (12th of April, 2014): http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/wps/portal/go/hsie

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jay
Scoop.it!

Shel Silverstein: 'The Giving Tree' excerpt - YouTube

"Once there was a tree…and she loved a little boy.

 

So begins a story of unforgettable perception, beautifully written and illustrated by the gifted and versatile Shel Silverstein."

Jay's insight:

Picture books such as Shel Silverstein's, 'The GIving Tree' can introduce to ES1 students the value of respecting nature and our relationship with it. The book also has an underlying theme of compassion and sacrifice and asks students to think about the ways in which we can give back to those that we love and why. Stories are powerful conductors of information because as Meek (1991) suggests, relating fictional stories back to their own experience through expression, is an important part of sense-making for children.

 

 

Whilst reading the book with students, the teacher might ask them to note the ways which the tree provides for the boy e.g. shade, food and timber for building. Afterwards, the students can reflect on whether the boy did the right thing and what he could have done in return. Finally, students can be asked to draw a special place that they care about and think about the ways they can protect and preserve it i.e. their school, their garden, the beach.

 

The criteria for assessment will be based on student's ability to: a) "match features in photographs, pictures, books and models to those seen in their environment" (Can they relate the tree in the book to those in their home, school and neighbourhood?), b) "demonstrate the ways in which they can care for their home, classroom, school and local community" and c) "describes places that they view as special" (NSW BoS, 2006).

 

References:

 

Meek, M. (1991). Why are stories so special? On being literate. London: The Bodley Head

 

NSW Board of Studies (2006). HSIE K-6 Syllabus. Retrieved from (12th of April, 2014): http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/wps/portal/go/hsie

 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jay
Scoop.it!

People and Environments Around the World: Global Education

People and Environments Around the World: Global Education | The Giving Tree - Caring for Natural Things in Our Immediate Environment | Scoop.it

"This activity raises awareness of features of the natural environment and provides a foundation for exploring how human activities affect the environment."

Jay's insight:

The Global Education 'Teaching Activities' webpage resource provides great examples of how to teach global perspectives for a range of learning outcomes. In addition, the activities are embedded with the 3 cross curriculum priorities of ATSI, Asian and sustainable perspectives. 

 

The linked activity aims to introduce the concept of environment to ES1 learners and they will be given the opportunity to identify the difference between natural/built environments and healthy/damaged environments and "demonstrate their awareness that the world extends beyond their immediate environment" (NSW BoS, 2006).

 

The students are shown a variety of images depicting human interaction with the natural environment around the world and asked to offer their opinions. These images can be found on the Global Perspectives website and filtered for appropriateness.

Questions for discussion include:

- What is each place like?

- What might live there?

- How do people use this place?

- How have people changed this place?

The students then demonstrate their level of understanding through categorising the images into groups and drawing or painting their own ideas about the environment.

 

This is a great activity for the beginning of the year to establish prior knowledge of students before commencing with the ENES1 outcome.

 

Reference:

 

NSW Board of Studies (2006), HSIE K-6 Syllabus. Retrieved from (12th of April, 2014): http://k6.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/wps/portal/go/hsie

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jay
Scoop.it!

Animals of the Dreaming Zoomobile | Taronga Conservation Society Australia

Animals of the Dreaming Zoomobile | Taronga Conservation Society Australia | The Giving Tree - Caring for Natural Things in Our Immediate Environment | Scoop.it

Animals of the Dreaming is an exciting one hour program combining two fascinating aspects of Australia – native animals and Dreamtime stories.

Jay's insight:

The Taronga Zoo offers this unique excursion as a way of presenting an Aboriginal perspective for HSIE, English and Creative Arts key learning areas.

The students will learn about the Dreamtime through the songs and stories of Col Hardy, a respected Aboriginal Elder. Afterwards, a qualified Education Officer will introduce a wide variety of unique and wonderful animals such as Ferris the Carpet Python, Brian the Echidna and Larry the Salt Water Crocodile. 

 

Excursions are important for many Key Learning Areas but particularly in the Social Sciences. Aitken and Sinnema's case studies (2008) show the importance of guest speakers in positively affecting student perceptions of diverse cultures, age groups and experiences. 

This particular excursion combines a number of elements such as music and animals to engage students in Aboriginal culture and the environment.

 

Students can demonstrate their knowledge through discussions directly after their experience followed up by activities in the classroom that extend their understanding of the Dreaming and of Australia's native animals and their value. By learning about Australian animals through the lens of The Dreamtime, Indigenous content is normalised and not added on (Nakata, 2011), in a fun and beneficial way for all students.

 

The BoS's Working With Aboriginal Communities (2008) states that "it is only when Aboriginal people are genuinely involved in the teaching of their history and culture that learning is credible and meaningful" and programs such as these can start to build meaningful relationships between educators/schools and the Aboriginal community.

 

**Col Hardy is the recipient of the Order of Australia, recognition of his contribution to the community over many years. His musical talent has also been recognised through the Tamworth Country Music Festival's 'Golden Guitar' award.**

 

References:

NSW Board of Studies. (2008). Working with Aboriginal communities: A guide to community consultation and protocols. Retrieved from (on 13th of April 2014): http://abed.boardofstudies.nsw.edu.au/files/working-with-aboriginal-communities.pdf ;

 

Nakata, M. (2011). Pathways for Indigenous Education in the Australian Curriculum Framework. Indigenous Education, 40, 1-8.

As cited in: 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment [4th Edition], South Melbourne, Vic.: Cengage Learning.

 

Aitken, G. and Sinnema, C. (2008). Effective Pedagogy in Social Sciences/Tikanga a lwi: Best Evidence Synthesis Iteration. New Zealand Ministry of Education: Wellington. Retrieved from (08th of April, 2014): http://www.educationcounts.govt.nz/__data/assets/pdf_file/0020/32924/Full_Report.pdf

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Jay
Scoop.it!

Science & Design for Kids: Recycled Bird Feeder Mobile - Babble Dabble Do

Science & Design for Kids: Recycled Bird Feeder Mobile - Babble Dabble Do | The Giving Tree - Caring for Natural Things in Our Immediate Environment | Scoop.it

"Letting kids become more involved in paper, wood and plastic recycling, making bird feeders, feeding and watching birds not only helps children learn more things about nature and modern life, but gives them a sense of responsibility also."

 

- Retrieved from: http://www.lushome.com/25-recycled-crafts-smart-recycling-ideas-making-cheap-bird-feeder-designs/108838

Jay's insight:

Sustainability is an issue that must be addressed in the modern curriculum. The Australian Government's 'Sustainability Curriculum Framework' (2010) rationale states that "In an era marked by concerns about the future of the planet, education for sustainability can be empowering, and an antidote to a sense of helplessness". Hence it is important for teachers to give students active roles as members of a sustainable community.

 

Making a bird feeder out of recycled materials, introduces ES1 students to the concept of recycling and renewable resources whilst actively caring for their local wildlife. It is a fun activity that incorporates Creative Arts skills and a little bit of Science as well (balancing out the mobile).

For kindergarden aged students, the teacher would conduct the activity as a group. Students could be encouraged to bring recyclables from the home such as toilet paper rolls and egg cartons to contribute to the materials for the bird feeder mobile.

They would then help cover the cardboard in corn syrup and bird seeds and the teacher could stitch the mobile together. 

 

Watching birds gather on the mobile outside a classroom window would give students a sense of responsibility for their natural environment. Assessment could include naming and drawing the different types of birds the feeder attracts.

 

References: 

 

Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities (2005). Sustainability Curriculum Framework. 

 

As cited by: 

Gilbert, R., & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment [4th Edition], South Melbourne, Vic.: Cengage Learning. p.400.

 

more...
No comment yet.