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Bring the power of apps to food waste

Bring the power of apps to food waste | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

It had to happen eventually - an app to deal with food waste. Bringing the concept of the flash mob to waste food.

 

FlashFood is a food recovery network, powered by social media, that feeds the hungry by collecting excess food from restaurants, caterers, and conventions, and delivering it to nearby community centers. Trialling in Phoenix, Arizona, but with aspirations to go global.

 

The FlashFood mobile application leverages the power of instant communication to bridge the gaps between food service vendors, community organizations, and the hungry. If a vendor has excess food, he or she can instantly tell a local community organization that they wish to donate it. That organization can then 1) coordinate pick up of the food and 2) alert food recipients of an upcoming donation at a nearby community center.

 

Relevant site:

FlashFood website: http://flashfoodrecovery.com/

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The Future of Waste
Articles mapping out the future of waste. Blogs at www.garbologie.com
Curated by Adam Johnson
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Promising solution: Bioplastic made from shrimp shells

Promising solution: Bioplastic made from shrimp shells | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

or many people, “plastic” is a one-word analog for environmental disaster. It is made from precious petroleum, after all, and once discarded in landfills and oceans, it takes centuries to degrade.


Then came apparent salvation: “bioplastics,” durable substances made from renewable cellulose, a plant-based polysaccharide. But problems remained. For one, the current bioplastics do not fully degrade in the environment. For another, their use is now limited to packaging material or simple containers for food and drink.


Now researchers at Harvard’s Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering have introduced a new bioplastic isolated from shrimp shells. It’s made from chitosan, a form of chitin — the second-most abundant organic material on Earth.


Chitin, a tough polysaccharide, is the main ingredient in the hardy shells of crustaceans, the armorlike cuticles of insects, and even the flexible wings of butterflies.


The Wyss Institute makes its shrilk from chitin from shrimp shells, most which would otherwise be discarded or used in fertilizer or makeup, and a fibroin protein from silk. Researchers discussed it in a March online study in the journal Macromolecular Materials & Engineering.


Shrilk is cheaply and easily fabricated by a novel method that preserves chitosan’s strong mechanical properties. The researchers said that for the first time, this tough, transparent, and renewable material can be used to make large, 3-D objects with complex shapes using traditional casting or injection-molding techniques. That means objects made from shrilk can be mass-manufactured and will be as robust as items made with the everyday plastics used in toys and cell phones.


“There is an urgent need in many industries for sustainable materials that can be mass produced,” Wyss Director Donald E. Ingber said in March. “Our scalable manufacturing method shows that chitosan, which is readily available and inexpensive, can serve as a viable bioplastic that could potentially be used instead of conventional plastics for numerous industrial applications.” This environmentally safe alternative to plastic could also be used to make trash bags, packaging, and diapers.


Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
Adam Johnson's insight:
Bioplastic from shrimp (prawn) shells. Old(ish) news but very interesting all the same.
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Marco Bertolini's curator insight, May 6, 2014 11:28 AM

Des plastiques bio fabriqués à partir de la chitine des crevettes...

satish's curator insight, May 7, 2014 2:03 AM

टिकाऊपण, लवचिकता आणि सक्षमता यामुळे प्लॅस्टिकचा वापर विविध क्षेत्रामध्ये मोठ्या प्रमाणात वाढला आहे. मात्र, त्याच वेळी त्याच्या अविघटनशीलतेमुळे प्लॅस्टिकचे प्रदुषणही वेगाने वाढत आहे. त्यामुळे विघटनशील असे जैवप्लॅस्टिक विकसित करण्यासाठी जगभरामध्ये सातत्याने संशोधन होत आहे. मात्र, सध्या उपलब्ध असलेलेजैव प्लॅस्टिकचा वापर अत्यंत मर्यादीत कारणांसाठी होऊ शकतो. त्यातही खाद्यपदार्थांचे पॅकेजिंग आणि पेयपात्रासाठी सामान्यतः केला जातो. तसेच हे जैव प्लॅस्टिकही अत्यंत कमी वेगाने विघटीत होते. या साऱ्या समस्यावर मात करण्यासाठी हार्वर्ड विद्यापीठातील वायस इन्स्टिट्यूट फॉर बायोलॉजिकल इन्स्पायर्ड येथील संशोधकांनी कोळंबीच्या कवचापासून जैव प्लॅस्टिक वेगळे केले आहे.

 

प्लॅस्टिकच्या अविघटनशीलतेमुळे होणारे प्रदुषण रोखण्यासाठी हे जैव प्लॅस्टिक अत्यंत उपयुक्त ठरेल.

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This Startup Wants To Turn America’s Yard Waste Into A Petroleum Substitute

This Startup Wants To Turn America’s Yard Waste Into A Petroleum Substitute | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it
Alliance Bio-Products says its fuel will be cheaper than oil–and that there’s enough yard waste in the country to make more than we need.
Adam Johnson's insight:
Converting green waste into petroleum products. The holy grail, and if it works, will be a game changer.
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The First 100% Recyclable Carpets Are Here

The First 100% Recyclable Carpets Are Here | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it
Traditional carpets take up the second-largest amount of U.S. landfill space. Now a full reinvention of how carpets are constructed means they ca
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The best thing about these carpets is that they are simple to install, making them more likely to be taken up in the marketplace.
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New US-based institute invests 70 million to optimise recycling

New US-based institute invests 70 million to optimise recycling | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it
The US government is looking to invest up to US$ 70 million (Euro 62 million) in a new research institute focused on boosting recycled content in manufacturing and on reducing recycling costs. The Reducing EMbodied-energy And Decreasing Emissions (REMADE) Institute will be headquartered in Rochester, New York, and will develop technologies to reduce energy usage and greenhouse gas emissions in manufacturing by focusing on recycling.

Via Matthew Franklin
Adam Johnson's insight:
A (possible) new research institute focused on boosting recycled content in manufacturing. But dependent on POTUS approval, so probably not...
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Matthew Franklin's curator insight, January 16, 8:05 AM

An interesting new project, which could make up part of the path to zero waste

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P&G project turns beach plastic into shampoo bottles

P&G project turns beach plastic into shampoo bottles | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it
Procter & Gamble Co. is teaming up with recyclers TerraCycle Inc. and Suez Environnement SA to create the first-ever shampoo bottle containing up to 25 percent recycled beach plastic.
P&G is rolling out plans for the limited edition container for its Head & Shoulders brand of shampoo in

Via María Teresa (Maite) Machado R.
Adam Johnson's insight:
Further steps to create the new plastics economy
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María Teresa (Maite) Machado R.'s comment, January 28, 3:13 AM
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A Circular Economy Handbook for Business and Supply Chains

A Circular Economy Handbook for Business and Supply Chains | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

A Circular Economy Handbook for Business and Supply Chains: Repair, remake, redesign, rethink, Catherine Weetman, 2017, ISBN 978 0 7494 7675 5, 385 pp. The world is ever changing and the pace of ma…


Via María Teresa (Maite) Machado R.
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A book worth reading to understand the circular economy
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Pallettable Spaces - Made from Construction Site Leftovers!

Pallettable Spaces - Made from Construction Site Leftovers! | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

Reusing old timber, this amazing structure was built using reclaimed timber.

 

I can't help thinking that this sort of idea would be a great application for the thousands of tonnes of CCA treated timber that has been left from the destruction of Christchurch in New Zealand.

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Hello Compost: Trading Food Waste for Local, Healthy Food

Hello Compost: Trading Food Waste for Local, Healthy Food | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

Hello Compost is a service being piloted in New York that incentivises families to collect their food waste by giving them credits towards fresh produce for each pound of food waste they bring.


People bring their food waste to a Project EATS market, where it is weighed and a credit toward produce is given to the people. The food waste is composted and sold commercially to fund the service.


Presumably the fact that the food waste is uncontaminated means that the compost is quite valuable (unlike compost from general municipal waste). 


A great idea connecting food with waste.


Relevant sites:

Hello Compost: https://www.facebook.com/HelloCompost

Project EATS: http://projecteats.org/

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How Tim Hortons closed the loop with coffee cups

How Tim Hortons closed the loop with coffee cups | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it
The coffee and donut giant has diverted thousands of paper cups from landfill by turning them into trays.

 

The way it works is that Tim Hortons shops have recycling units collecting hot beverage cups, lids, napkins and trays. Collection contractors and paper haulers take the stuff to Scotia Recycling Limited, which sorts and compresses recycled products into bales. The bales are delivered to CKF, a Canadian-owned paper product manufacturer based in Nova Scotia, which then processes the bales, molding them into new trays that can be sold back to Tim Hortons restaurants.


This story focuses on the recycling element. Tim Hortons also offers incentives to use reusable cups. No doubt this recycling approach is needed because a lot of coffee goes out in disposable cups.


Relevant sites:

Tim Hortons: http://sustainabilityreport.timhortons.com/planet_restaurants_initiatives.html#env

Scotia Recycling: http://scotiarecyclinggroup.com/

CKF: http://www.ckfinc.com/Home/tabid/41/language/en-US/Default.aspx

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Circular economy hub

Circular economy hub | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

The Guardian has recently launced a circular economy hub. It is a very exciting development, as it incirporates a sense of the business model alongside the technology.

 

To use the words of the Guardian, the circular economy is "a radically different business model from the linear one we are used to, and a compelling concept. Keeping resources in the economy for longer means diverting valuable materials from landfill and reducing the energy, land and water use necessary for primary production"


It is exactly what this Scoop.it magazine is about, and hopefully the hub will move from strength to strength.

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New space junk disposal effort

New space junk disposal effort | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

A simple solution for the problem of space junk.

 

At the end of the life of a spacecraft's life, a 200 m long wire is deployed that acts as a brake, slowing the spacecraft enough to burn up in the atmosphere.

 

Reinforcing the fact that the problem of rubbish exists everywhere.

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Restaurant sells food in edible packaging

Restaurant sells food in edible packaging | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

WikiBar in Paris only offers customers foods that come in an edible container.

 

As the article concludes, could this be the future of package-free food?

 

Relevant site:

Wikipearl: www.wikipearl.com 

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Additives for mechanical plastic recycling - BASF

Additives for mechanical plastic recycling - BASF | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

An interesting article about the work BASF is doing with additives to ensure that recycled plastics perform as well or better than virgin product across a range of products.

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The revolutionary technology pushing Sweden toward the impossible goal of zero emissions

The revolutionary technology pushing Sweden toward the impossible goal of zero emissions | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it
Degerhamn, Sweden As far as the eye can see, the only thing polluting our pristine environment is the gas-guzzling car I’m riding in. It’s a chilly April morning in Kalmar county in southern Sweden, and as we drive past pastel-colored wooden houses separated by acres of farmland, Martin Olofsson, a researcher at Linnaeus University
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Carbon capture using algae - a nice approach.
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3D Printed Tires that Never Die!

3D Printed Tires that Never Die! | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it
Even when I was a kid (which was a long time ago), I remember thinking how air-filled tires really are less than desirable and that there
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3D printed tyre that is made from recycled materials and is fully recyclable at the end of it's life - fascinating application of technology.
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Recycling of MDF waste moves a step closer

Recycling of MDF waste moves a step closer | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it
Waste recycling: MDF Recovery have completed proof of concept to develop a commercially viable process to recover wood fibre from waste MDF
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A press release from a technology development firm that promises to recycle MDF back into fibre for remanufacture
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Ikea UK sent zero waste to landfill last year

Ikea UK sent zero waste to landfill last year | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it
Ikea sent zero waste to landfill in the UK last year, for the first time in the furniture retailer's 32-year history.

Via María Teresa (Maite) Machado R.
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The significance of IKEA in the circular economy cannot be understated
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SCOTLAND, Drinking like a fish: Whisky waste to be fed to salmon

SCOTLAND, Drinking like a fish: Whisky waste to be fed to salmon | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it
THE first factory to turn undrinkable waste liquid from Scotland’s whisky industry into fish food will open this time next year – and then go…

Via María Teresa (Maite) Machado R.
Adam Johnson's insight:
Whisky waste to fish food - could this get any better?
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María Teresa (Maite) Machado R.'s comment, January 28, 3:11 AM
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Italian city increases recycling by almost 30 per cent in just four years | Resource Magazine

Italian city increases recycling by almost 30 per cent in just four years | Resource Magazine | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it
Parma has reached 72 per cent recycling and 117kg waste per person since a citizens-led initiative to move away from waste disposal and increase recycling was launched in 2012

Via Matthew Franklin
Adam Johnson's insight:
A very interesting case study, and one that may be relevant to others.
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Matthew Franklin's curator insight, June 22, 2016 6:04 AM

This article is based on our latest case study! Check it out in our publications

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Can the economy go full circle?

Can the economy go full circle? | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

The circular economy, recycling products after use, is cheap and environmentally friendly – but is it up to companies, consumers or the government to drive it forward? Sponsored feature A circular economy has long been a very good idea.


Via Flora Moon
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The Guardian is doing some great work on the circular economy - the hub is a great development.

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Daniel LaLiberte's curator insight, October 3, 2013 9:49 PM

There is a simple way to motivate rapid change in a fair and self-regulating way:  Include in the cost of goods and services the full cost of removing and recycling 100% of waste.   That includes all waste and pollution resulting from mining, production, etc.   

 

If we don't pay the full cost now, guess who ends up paying many times more?  Think of the children.

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Will.i.am: 'Let's make plastic a verb'

Will.i.am: 'Let's make plastic a verb' | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

A great interview with a somewhat eccentric will.i.am about waste and technology and disruption. It mirrors a lot of what I've been saying. I do think that a step change really is possible.


Some extracts from the interview:

The reason why a city doesn't recycle is because people don't see waste as a commodity. They see waste as waste. I was like wow, with the technology we have today it's only waste because we waste the opportunity to turn it into something else. So let's not recycle, let's upcycle.

We have designed a system where you purchase something, it breaks and you throw it away and it's not useful in the next cycle but you still value the brand that produced it. That's some new shit and not what it was like when my grandma was in her 20s. In 1930 you purchased something that would last forever. There is a reason why antiques are antiques. The iPhone is never going to be a fucking antique because it's not going to work when it gets to that age

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Recycling is manufacturing: Creative business opportunities in recycled materials

Recycling is manufacturing: Creative business opportunities in recycled materials | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

An interesting article about a shift in thinking in Humboldt County, California about the opportunity presented by recycling as remanufacturing rather than landfill diversion.

 

The ideas expressed here neatly encapsulate my own thinking on "a world without waste", that it is more about entrepreneur led opportunity than government mandate.

 

From the article:

"Humboldt County will be able to benefit from this win-win situation the way we always get things done: creative problem-solvers working cooperatively to produce new products made from recycled materials, open new markets, and achieve the economy-of-scale necessary to grow our businesses."

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Separating e-waste into constituent components

Separating e-waste into constituent components | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

ATMI has developed eVolv, a very interesting technology for recycling e-waste, essentialy separating out the precious metals for reinserting back into the productive economy as raw materials:

 

The process is completed in a closed-loop system using a series of chemical baths, and desoldering techniques which reclaim much of the precious metal components for reuse. This technique is 99 percent sustainable, and can be implemented locally, directly in a manufacturer's warehouse. This approach also helps to relieve the global issue of e-Waste being broken down in poorer regions of the world where it affects human welfare, and the environment.


This was announced almost a year ago, however the eVolve website doesn't give any case studies of where the technology has been deployed. Perhaps something worth watching.

 

Relevant site:

ATMI - http://www.atmi-evolv.com/

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Biodegradable cigarette filter helps clear streets of discarded butts

Biodegradable cigarette filter helps clear streets of discarded butts | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

Cigarette butts are the most commonly reported item in litter counts. That is partially because they are so small and easy to think that tossing one away will make no difference, but also because they last so long (up to 15 years, and even then they don't degrade).

 

Greenbutts is a new filter that will biodegrade in a few weeks. This could be a very good thing for addressing litter.

 

The people behind the filter plan to have it on the market by 2014.

 

Relevant site:

Greenbutts: http://www.green-butts.com/

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Animal coffin - recycled waste materials to form a memorial coffin

Animal coffin - recycled waste materials to form a memorial coffin | The Future of Waste | Scoop.it

Animal Coffin is made from the materials coffee grounds, potato starch, flour, human hair and cardboard.

 

Animal Coffin is a biodegradable coffin made from recycled waste materials with flower- and tree seeds embedded. A tree will grow where the beloved animal is buried, thus providing a long-lasting memorial.

 

By giving waste material a second life Animal Coffin both provides an alternative for waste handling, conserves new resources and provides the opportunity to bid farewell of a beloved pet.

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