The French Culture
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Eiffel Tower Facts

Eiffel Tower Facts | The French Culture | Scoop.it

-built by Alexandre Gustave Eiffel

 

- officially opened in 1889


-Eiffel Tower is on the fifth place among the high-rise buildings in France


-painted in three different shades of color. The darkest tone used at the base of the building, and the brightest – at the top. 


-The tower is covered with 60 tons of paint every seven years to protect against corrosion.


-It took 2 years, 2 months, and 5 days, for the 300 workers involved, to complete the Eiffel Tower.


-stands 324 meters (1062.99 ft.) tall , inclusive of the 24 meters (78.7402 ft.)  antenna, and weighs 7,300 tons (14,600,000 lbs.).


-total of 1710 steps to the third level small platform at the top, 674 steps to the second level, and 347 steps to the first level




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Material Culture of France

-The French adhere to a strong and homogeneous set of values.

 

-They cherish their culture, history, language and cuisine, which is considered an art.

 

-The French have been and are today world leaders in fashion, food, wine, art and architecture.

 

-They embrace novelty, new ideas and manners with enthusiasm as long as they are elegant.

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Norms

-The French are always polite everywhere they go.


-They are enviornment conscious and they don't litter like Americans do.


-The French dress conservatively.


-They have high standards for their food. It has to be cooked properly and prepared just right.

 

-At a business or social meeting, shake hands with everyone present when arriving and leaving. A handshake may be quick with a light grip.

 

-Men may initiate handshakes with women.

 

-When family and close friends greet one another, they often kiss both cheeks.

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Gestures Used in France

French Etiquette:

 

Baiser la main = Hand Kissing

~A man kissing a woman's hand is a gesture of sophistication and refinement. The lips should not actually touch the hand, but simply hover above it.

 

 

Inappropriate Gesture:

 

Forming a circle with your forefinger and thumb in North America means that something is “amazing” or “OK-ed” but the gesture has a completely different meaning in France. Since making of the circle forms a zero, this gesture typically means that something or someone is worthless.

 

Pied de nez = Snub
~putting your thumb touching your nose and wiggling your finger to make fun of someone else behind their back.

 

Va te faire foutre 

~This is the most vulgar French gesture. It means "Up yours!" (or worse) and is the French equivalent of holding up your middle finger.

 

Do not slap your open palm over a closed fist (this is considered a vulgar gesture).

 

 

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Languages Spoke in France

French: official language, spoken by 80% of the population.

German: 3% predominantly in the eastern provinces of Alsace-Lorraine and Moselle.

Flemish: spoken by around 90,000 people in the north-east, which is 0.2% of the French population.

Italian: roughly 1.7% of the population.

 

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Map of France

Map of France | The French Culture | Scoop.it

Capital: France

 

Population: 65,630,692

 

Total Area: 211,209 sq mi

 

Location: Western Europe, bordering the Bay of Biscay and English Channel, between Belgium and Spain, southeast of the UK; bordering the Mediterranean Sea, between Italy and Spain

 

Climate: generally cool winters and mild summers, but mild winters and hot summers along the Mediterranean.

 

Major cities and population: Paris - 8.7 million people, Lyon - 1.2 million, Marseille - 1.2 million, Lille - 950,000 and Bordeaux - 640,000.

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Jean-Jacques Rousseau

Jean-Jacques Rousseau | The French Culture | Scoop.it

-French Philosopher

 

-He wrote Du contrat social (The Social Contract)

 

-recognized for exploring and rejecting several educational ideas

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Alexandre Gustave Eiffel and his creations

Alexandre Gustave Eiffel and his creations | The French Culture | Scoop.it

-Eiffel's most famous bridge, the Maria Pia over the Douro at Oporto, Portugal (1876), spans 500 feet by a single arch, 200 feet above high-water level.

 

-Maurice Koechlin, encouraged Eiffel in his design for the Paris exhibition tower of 1889. It was the factory-made components, fitted together on the site for the viaduct, that made the 984-foot-high Eiffel Tower possible.

 

-

 

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Religions, Beliefs and Values

Religions:

Catholic: 80% of the population

Protestant: about 1 million people ascribe to this religion

Islam: 5 million Muslims in France

Jewish: 650,000 Jews in France

 

 

Beliefs:

Secularism doesn't reject religion but attempts to bar any single religion from gaining political control.

The French believe that the French Revolution was in part a reaction to the power and wealth of the Catholic Church.

 

 

Values:

The family is the social adhesive of the country and each member has certain duties and responsibilities.

The extended family provides both emotional and financial support.

Families have few children, but parents take their role as guardians and providers very seriously.

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Symbols

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/40/Marianne_Symbol_of_french_republic_3.jpg

 

Marianne: symbol of republic as a motherland and it stands for rallying cry of "liberty, equality, and fraternity."

 

http://skreened.com/render-product/q/m/q/qmqwehsiayuatmzwaskw/gallic-rooster-france-2.american-apparel-unisex-baseball-tee.white-red.w760h760.jpg

 

Gallic Rooster: 1st royal symbol but during the revolution came to stand for the identity of the nation.

 

http://digitaljournal.com/img/9/1/2/2/9/7/i/7/6/8/o/zblandine.JPG

 

Local Catholic Church: symbol of local identity. The church bell rings to mark deaths, weddings, and wars.

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Flag of France

Flag description:
three equal vertical bands of blue (hoist side), white, and red; known as the "Le drapeau tricolore" (French Tricolor), the origin of the flag dates to 1790 and the French Revolution; the design and/or colors are similar to a number of other flags, including those of Belgium, Chad, Ireland, Cote d'Ivoire, Luxembourg, and Netherlands; the official flag for all French dependent areas

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