The Ethics and Economics of Food
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Organic food advocates weigh in on the recent organics-aren't-more-nutritious ... - Mother Nature Network (blog)

Organic food advocates weigh in on the recent organics-aren't-more-nutritious ... - Mother Nature Network (blog) | The Ethics and Economics of Food | Scoop.it
Examiner.comOrganic food advocates weigh in on the recent organics-aren't-more-nutritious ...Mother Nature Network (blog)You may have read about the recently released study by Stanford University that found “no significant differences between organic...
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The case for organic food - Winona Daily News

The case for organic food - Winona Daily News | The Ethics and Economics of Food | Scoop.it
Examiner.comThe case for organic foodWinona Daily News“There isn't much difference between organic and conventional foods, if you're an adult and making a decision based solely on your health,” concluded senior study author Dena Bravata.
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County food analysis targets obesity in poor | Recordnet.com

County food analysis targets obesity in poor | Recordnet.com | The Ethics and Economics of Food | Scoop.it
STOCKTON - Public health officials took a "food snapshot" of three of the city's poorest neighborhoods as a starting point for implementing improvements for better nutrition and greater participation in physical activity, with the end goal of...
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Prison Planet.com » Media Begins Attacking Organic Food ...

Prison Planet.com » Media Begins Attacking Organic Food ... | The Ethics and Economics of Food | Scoop.it
If you choose to consume organic foods free of genetically modified ingredients, mercury-containing high-fructose corn syrup, and a host of other harmful ingredients, then you are in the sights of some media publications ...
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Combating child obesity a priority - Atlanta Journal Constitution

Combating child obesity a priority - Atlanta Journal Constitution | The Ethics and Economics of Food | Scoop.it

Private MDCombating child obesity a priorityAtlanta Journal ConstitutionObesity is a major physical indicator that someone might have pre-diabetes or diabetes. We must focus on our future.

1.) The Basic subject of the column is that terrible diet choices and lack of physical exercise can lead to a preventable type II diabetis.

2.) Information the writer gives.

-Americans need to maintain better diets and exercise regularly

-95% of diebetis cases are type II which is preventable

-1 and 5 children are classified obese and have diabetes

-the diabetis age group keeps getting younger and younger

3.) The author feels strongly about expressing the danger of childhood obesity

4.)The author doesn't directly express his opinion, but his use of language shows his view on it.

5.)The columnist did a lot of research on this topic

6.)This article as written for people who want to spread the information about obesity.

7.)The author give enough information for me to agree, he shows statistics and explains how the desesase works.

The author uses emotional appeal to get the reader feel the need to help end childhood obesity.

 

 


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World hunger blamed on U.S.

World hunger blamed on U.S. | The Ethics and Economics of Food | Scoop.it

The United States donates more food to the world than most other nations combined. But there are some who say that while the quantity is fine, the quality is lacking.


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Pro-GMO Propaganda in California Dismantled by New Cost Study | The Alliance for Natural Health USA

Pro-GMO Propaganda in California Dismantled by New Cost Study | The Alliance for Natural Health USA | The Ethics and Economics of Food | Scoop.it
Opponents of the GMO labeling initiative say it will raise food costs by hundreds of dollars per family when in fact it will likely cause NO cost increase at all!

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Hungary Destroys Its Monsanto GMO Corn Fields

Hungary Destroys Its Monsanto GMO Corn Fields | The Ethics and Economics of Food | Scoop.it

by Dr Mercola In March, Hungary introduced a new regulation that states seeds must be checked for GMO before they are introduced to the market. However, some GMO seeds made it to the farmers withou...


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Electronic Revolution: Covert Sterilization From GMO Created Corn

Electronic Revolution: Covert Sterilization From GMO Created Corn | The Ethics and Economics of Food | Scoop.it
Covert Sterilization From GMO Created Corn. Scientists have created the ultimate GM crop: contraceptive corn. The pregnancy prevention plants are the handiwork of the San Diego biotechnology company Epicyte, where ...

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WATCH: 'OMG, GMO's!' Rap

WATCH: 'OMG, GMO's!' Rap | The Ethics and Economics of Food | Scoop.it
How much do you know about genetically-modified foods? A cheeky music video by David Holmes, the New York University-educated force behind the popular "Fracking Song," aims to educate the public with "OMG GMO's!

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Food insecurity in Mali: Identifying vulnerable households with precision - Bocoum (2012) - CIRAD

Food insecurity in Mali: Identifying vulnerable households with precision - Bocoum (2012) - CIRAD | The Ethics and Economics of Food | Scoop.it

Poverty is a major factor in undernourishment. However, poor households may have enough food, while those that are above the poverty line may not. This is the paradox revealed by research in Mali. In 2010, 16% of people in developing countries were undernourished; way above the 10% target set by the Millennium Development Goals. This poor result calls into question food security policies, which are often based on macroeconomic indicators. Using household surveys, a research study on Mali confirms that poverty is an important factor of hunger, but it also highlights certain paradoxes: poor households may have enough food, while those that are above the poverty line may not. It explains these paradoxes by identifying other factors influencing the food situation, such as household size, budget constraints, food preferences, and social obligations. Taking these additional factors into account helps to more accurately characterise undernourished populations and to better target action.


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USDA Budget Cut Could Slash 80 Percent of Produce Testing - FSN (2012)

USDA Budget Cut Could Slash 80 Percent of Produce Testing - FSN (2012) | The Ethics and Economics of Food | Scoop.it

Public testing for pathogens like E. coli, Salmonella and Listeria on fresh produce will drop by more than 80 percent if a key U.S. Department of Agriculture testing program is eliminated, according to an analysis by Food Safety News. The USDA's Microbiological Data Program was zeroed out in the Obama administration's 2013 budget request and Congress is not seeking funding for the $4.5 million program next year. It is rumored that MDP is set to close down at the end of this month, but the Agricultural Marketing Service, where MDP is housed, would not confirm the program's status. Elimination of the testing program has become a public health hot potato. Several media outlets, including the Chicago Tribune, the Associated Press, and the New York Times have weighed into the debate. The Times' editorial board even called it "a tiny food program that matters," an unusually high profile appeal for an obscure program with a relatively small budget. This "tiny" program was launched in 2001 simply to collect data about fresh produce contamination, but it now regularly sparks produce recalls when participating state labs find pathogens. Perhaps more importantly, the labs upload any positive test results to the Centers for Disease Control's PulseNet, which helps public health officials link foodborne illness cases to food products. MDP is also the only federal program that tests for non-O157 E. coli strains like the one that caused the deadly, high profile sprout outbreak in Germany last year. Both the Obama administration and the fresh produce industry have argued that AMS is the wrong agency to house the nation's only robust microbiological surveillance program for produce because AMS is focused on marketing, not food safety. Some believe the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, which has jurisdiction over the safety of produce, would be better equipped to screen produce for harmful pathogens. FDA gave Food Safety News an overview of its surveillance testing from 2009 to 2012. The agency pulls, on average, 80 percent fewer fresh produce samples for testing than MDP. It is not clear whether FDA plans to, or has the resources to ramp up testing to fill the void that would be left by eliminating MDP testing. FDA did not respond to questions about whether the agency would ramp up testing next year... 


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Monday's medical myth: organic food is more nutritious

Monday's medical myth: organic food is more nutritious | The Ethics and Economics of Food | Scoop.it

Across the world, outbreaks of food-borne illness, contamination and environmental scares have generated a lot of media attention and plenty of fear around food safety. Think of the recent E.


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"Food environment" in schools getting a bit better - Reuters

"Food environment" in schools getting a bit better - Reuters | The Ethics and Economics of Food | Scoop.it
"Food environment" in schools getting a bit betterReutersNEW YORK (Reuters Health) - U.S.
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Food for thought — we often have more than we need even in these tough times - Bluefield Daily Telegraph

Food for thought — we often have more than we need even in these tough times - Bluefield Daily Telegraph | The Ethics and Economics of Food | Scoop.it
Food for thought — we often have more than we need even in these tough timesBluefield Daily TelegraphA friend who grew up in central Florida came to town on a business trip.
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Hunger Chaos Nears As World Suffers From Historic Drought | EUTimes.net

Hunger Chaos Nears As World Suffers From Historic Drought | EUTimes.net | The Ethics and Economics of Food | Scoop.it
A new shocking report reveals that the world could soon experience a severe food crisis as historic drought affects almost the entire world.
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Obesity weighing on America – Latin America, that is

Obesity weighing on America – Latin America, that is | The Ethics and Economics of Food | Scoop.it
The fattening of Latin America mirrors a global pattern that has left some 1.5 billion adults overweight. Now, from Mexico to Chile, it's triggering a political response.

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Daniel Quinn on Facts of World Hunger

http://www.whatawaytogomovie.com presents another clip in the "Why Are Things Falling Apart?" series. In this one, Ishmael author Daniel Quinn discusses the misconceptions of agriculture.


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INFOGRAPH: Monies Funding (Pro and Con) the GMO "Just Label It" California Proposition 37 War

INFOGRAPH: Monies Funding (Pro and Con) the GMO "Just Label It" California Proposition 37 War | The Ethics and Economics of Food | Scoop.it

The people of California are fighting to get genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in our food supply labeled. Not surprisingly, the biotech industry is fighting back. The following infographic from Voters Edge shows just how much money is being spent by both sides, for and against GMO labeling in California. “See who’s spending money against our right to know labeling bill in CA and refuse to buy their products!” (Jon Abrahamson)....


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Monsanto Funds College Research: Big Ag 101 - Playing at a ...

Monsanto Funds College Research: Big Ag 101 - Playing at a ... | The Ethics and Economics of Food | Scoop.it

When government officials insist on making science-based decisions in food and agricultural policy, what happens when the research is increasingly funded by huge corporations with a vested interest in the results?


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MONSANTO CRIMES on Humanity?? - So easy an 11yr Old Kid can Explain it

SUBSCRIBE..THERE ARE A TON OF VIDS..JUST LIKE THIS ON HERE....SHARE IT WHILE YOU CAN!! MONSANTO GMO things like Fish with Human DNA?? MONSANTO sues neighbori... (RT @StopMonsantoMov: Posting again incase you missed MONSANTO CRIMES on Humanity?


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Monsanto’s Top 7 Lies About GMO Labeling and Proposition 37

Monsanto’s Top 7 Lies About GMO Labeling and Proposition 37 | The Ethics and Economics of Food | Scoop.it

Due to the near future voting on November 6, 2012 for California’s Proposition 37, there has been a lot of heat going back and forth concerning GMO foods.

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The Impact of Seed Policy Reforms and Intellectual Property Rights on Crop Productivity in India - Kolady &al (2012) - J Ag Econ

The Impact of Seed Policy Reforms and Intellectual Property Rights on Crop Productivity in India - Kolady &al (2012) - J Ag Econ | The Ethics and Economics of Food | Scoop.it

The growth of private investment in developing-country agriculture, new advances in the biological sciences, and rapid integration of developing countries into the global trading system has heightened interest in the topic of seed market and intellectual property rights’ (IPRs) policies among public policy-makers, corporate decision-makers and other actors in the agricultural sector. But there are still unanswered questions about whether emerging and evolving seed policy reforms and IPR regimes in developing countries will contribute to increasing crop productivity and improving food security. This paper attempts to answer some of these questions by focusing specifically on the case of India, the regional leader in implementing seed policy reforms and IPRs in agriculture. Findings indicate that maize and pearl millet yields grew significantly during the last two decades due partly to the combination of (1) public policies that encouraged private investment in India’s seed industry during the 1980s, and (2) biological IPRs conferred by hybridisation that conveniently married the private sector’s need for appropriability with the nation’s need for productivity growth. Although past lessons are not an indication of future success, this convergence of policy solutions and technology opportunities can be replicated for other crops that are vital to India’s food security.


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Are Healthy Foods Really More Expensive? It Depends on How You Measure the Price - Carlson & Frazão (2012) - USDA

Are Healthy Foods Really More Expensive? It Depends on How You Measure the Price - Carlson & Frazão (2012) - USDA | The Ethics and Economics of Food | Scoop.it

Most Americans consume diets that do not meet Federal dietary recommendations. A common explanation is that healthier foods are more expensive than less healthy foods. To investigate this assumption, the authors compare prices of healthy and less healthy foods using three different price metrics: the price of food energy ($/calorie), the price of edible weight ($/100 edible grams), and the price of an average portion ($/average portion). They also calculate the cost of meeting the recommendations for each food group. For all metrics except the price of food energy, the authors find that healthy foods cost less than less healthy foods (defined for this study as foods that are high in saturated fat, added sugar, and/or sodium, or that contribute little to meeting dietary recommendations).


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GM crops on the rise in Portugal - Portugal News (2012)

GM crops on the rise in Portugal - Portugal News (2012) | The Ethics and Economics of Food | Scoop.it

The growing of genetically modified (GM) corn in Portugal increased by 59 percent last year, being planted in 7,724 hectares of fields, compared to the 4,900 hectares planted in 2010, a study by the Ministry of Agriculture has revealed... According to the farmers questioned during the study, 71 percent said they had chosen GM corn in order to control insect infestations, while others said they wanted to try a new crop variety and benefit from the increased harvest that GM crops produce. Insect infestations cause a high percentage of corn harvests to be lost, up to 50 percent in some cases. Francisco Palma, President of the Lower Alentejo Farmer’s Association, believes these advantages to be the reason that GM corn crops are chosen by farmers, as well as the savings they represent in production. He considers that everyday reality will mean GM corn will be more and more favoured by farmers, especially as "consumers want cheaper food all the time." ... On a global scale, according to data from the International Service for the Acquisition of Agribiotech Applications, the area used to plant genetically modified crops last year was 160 million hectares, carried out by 16.7 million farmers in 29 countries. This figure represents an increase of 12 million hectares compared to 2010. According to data from EuropaBio, the total area covered by GM crops in the European Union last year was 114,600 hectares, between six member countries; Portugal, Spain, the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Romania and Poland. This represents a 10 percent increase in the plantation area compared to 201


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