The Dust Bowl by cory
7 views | +0 today
Follow
The Dust Bowl by cory
the dust bowl
Curated by Cory Crosby
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Cory Crosby
Scoop.it!

vocabulary

vocabulary | The Dust Bowl by cory | Scoop.it
Cory Crosby's insight:

1.Submarginal- not worth cultivating, as land less than satisfactory unproductive.

 2.disappointment- the state or feeling of being disappointed

3.possibilities –the state or fact of existing, happening, being done

4.bronchial-pertaining to the bronchia or bronchi

5.attainments- something attained a personal acquirement  achievement

6.humiliation-act or instance of humiliating or being humiliated.

7.journalists-person who practices the occupation or profession of journalism.

8.accumulations -act or state of accumulating state of being accumulated.

9.Visibility-the range of vision under given conditions

10.Technically-of the mechanical or industrial arts and applied sciences

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cory Crosby
Scoop.it!

scoop it letter

to grandma and grandpa

 

Cory Crosby's insight:

Dear, Grandmother and Grandfather

 

My writing this letter because I missed you and grandpa. It’s the summer of 1932. I just want to know how you are doing. I have been alright its been a slow and hot summer and we have been experience crazy dust storms here in Kansas. The dust storm’s started because the soil started to be dry and loose.  Also, farmers took over the grassland and covered it with wheat.  If that wasn’t enough, there was no rain at all!  All of the problems started in the early 1930’s.  When all this started, people had hard time getting money.  Some way’s people could get money were picking crops for farmers, moving to California, and being a farmer. I have moved to California but I did not have a lot of money. I should have moved because know I have dust pneumonia my slow die of the dust is everywhere on floor, in my bed and food.  You cant leave its present its always right in font of me or in the back of me. Its something you would not like coughing up dust all the time. The house live in is good home but the dust all always see its way in the house. Now you now know about the stock market crash and I lose my money.  Stock market crash was crazy I was rich but know broken. On the morning of Thursday, October 24, 1929, stock prices plummeted. Vast numbers of people were selling their stocks. Grandma Very soon, stock trading became America’s favorite pastime as investors jockeyed to make a quick killing. Investors mortgaged their homes and foolishly invested their life savings into hot stocks such as Ford and RCA. Grandma a record 16.4 million shares exchanged hands.  The ticker tape machines fell behind by nearly 3 hours. With all hope of a market recovery now gone, panic selling continued and the market fell another 12%. Also grandma I meet this hobo yesterday he came up and   asked me to help he show him and the right way to the American life. Grandma the Hobos were often welcomed in areas of under employment or when their labor was required. They were also viewed as a menace when unemployment was high or when the hobo's labor was no longer needed. Many times they were literally driven out of town by the local police who would meet incoming freight trains and take the hobos to the county line. Also grandma and grandpa after the dust to help build the hoover dam project. Some of the sources cite the number of deaths as 112.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cory Crosby
Scoop.it!

Primary sources #1

the dust bowl

 

Cory Crosby's insight:

The Dust Bowl is one of the largest examples of a manmade environmental disaster. The destruction largely happened due to the heavy farming that occurred in the Great Plains region of the Midwest. The area of the United States is mostly grassland and relies on the root systems of grasses to hold down the topsoil vital for growing crops. Several factors such as homestead and other land grant programs opened the Great Plains to settlers looking to start their own farms. Unfortunately common farming practices used to preserved topsoil were not put to use. Common practices such as rotation of crops or leaving soil fallow usually extend the use of land allowing for plants to always have root systems in the ground holding top soil in place.

While the role that humans played in creating the dust bowl is significant the droughts that occurred during the 1930s acted as the match to the fuse. By the time of the droughts the topsoil of the Great Plains had been subjected to the farming practices that harmed it for decades. The drought finished the job by drying up the loose topsoil into dust. The winds that regularly sweep the Midwest did the rest. Tons of topsoil were carried into gargantuan dust storms and dumped into the Atlantic Ocean. This made large regions of Oklahoma, Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona useless for farming.

The economic impact was devastating literally ending the age of independent farming. Many families already on the brink of starvation due to the drought and the Great Depression were forced to migrate to other regions of the country. Due to the expense of restoring the farmland after the drought small farms became economically impossible to maintain. Dust Bowls are not just caused by poor farming practices. There are also the effects of overgrazing by cattle and of course climate change making a region more arid. The threat of the Dust Bowl scenario happening elsewhere in the world is high and governments are looking to find ways to protect the delicate balance of their ecosystems.




more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cory Crosby
Scoop.it!

Primary Sources #2

Primary Sources #2 | The Dust Bowl by cory | Scoop.it
When drought struck Oklahoma in the 1930s, the author and her husband stayed behind to protect their 28-year-old farm. Her letters to a friend paint a picture of dire poverty, desiccated soil, and long days with no sunshine.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cory Crosby
Scoop.it!

historical website topic #3

historical website topic #3 | The Dust Bowl by cory | Scoop.it
The Dust Bowl was a period of severe dust storms causing major ecological and agricultural damage to prairie lands in the 1930s.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Cory Crosby
Scoop.it!

historical website topic #1

The Dust Bowl, or the Dirty Thirties, was a period of severe dust storms causing major ecological and agricultural damage to American and Canadian prairie lands in the 1930s, particularly in 1934 and 1936. The phenomenon was caused by severe drought combined with farming methods that did not include crop rotation, fallow fields, cover crops, soil terracing and wind-breaking trees to prevent wind erosion.[1] Extensive deep plowing of the virgin topsoil of the Great Plains in the preceding decade had displaced the natural deep-rooted grasses that normally kept the soil in place and trapped moisture even during periods of drought and high winds. Rapid mechanization of farm implements, especially small gasoline tractors and widespread use of the harvester-combine were significant in the decisions to convert grassland (much of which received no more than 10 inches (250 mm) of precipitation per year) to cultivated cropland.

During the drought of the 1930s, without natural anchors to keep the soil in place, it dried, turned to dust, and blew away with the prevailing winds. At times, the clouds blackened the sky, reaching all the way to East Coast cities such as New York and Washington, D.C. Much of the soil ended up deposited in the Atlantic Ocean, carried by prevailing winds. These immense dust storms—given names such as "black blizzards" and "black rollers"—often reduced visibility to a few feet (a meter) or less. The Dust Bowl affected 100,000,000 acres (400,000 km2), centered on the panhandles of Texas and Oklahoma, and adjacent parts of New Mexico, Colorado, and Kansas.[2]

Millions of acres of farmland were damaged, and hundreds of thousands of people were forced to leave their homes; many of these families (often known as "Okies", since so many came from Oklahoma) migrated to California and other states, where they found economic conditions little better during the Great Depression than those they had left. Owning no land, many became migrant workers who traveled from farm to farm to pick fruit and other crops at starvation wages. Author John Steinbeck later wrote The Grapes of Wrath, which won the Pulitzer Prize, and Of Mice and Men, about such people.

more...
No comment yet.