The dark side of sugar. Sweet in the beginning, bitter in the end.
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The dark side of sugar. Sweet in the beginning, bitter by the end.

The dark side of sugar. Sweet in the beginning, bitter by the end. | The dark side of sugar. Sweet in the beginning, bitter in the end. | Scoop.it
According to a team of University of California San Francisco (UCSF), sugar should be controlled like alcohol and tobacco to protect public health. Many of the interventions that have reduced alcohol and tobacco consumption can be models for addressing the sugar problem, such as levying special sales taxes, controlling access, and tightening licensing requirements on vending machines and snack bars that sell high sugar products in schools and workplaces. There are good calories and bad calories, just as there are good fats and bad fats, good amino acids and bad amino acids, good carbohydrates and bad carbohydrates. But sugar is toxic beyond its calories. Limiting the consumption of sugar has challenges beyond educating people about its potential toxicity. The least understood of sugar’s damages, is far from just “empty calories” that make people fat. At the levels consumed by most Americans, sugar changes metabolism, raises blood pressure, critically alters the signaling of hormones and causes significant damage to the liver. Worldwide consumption of sugar has tripled during the past 50 years and is viewed as a key cause of the obesity epidemic. But obesity, may just be a marker for the damage caused by the toxic effects of too much sugar. According to a team of UCSF researchers, sugar is fueling a global obesity pandemic, contributing to 35 million deaths annually worldwide from non-communicable diseases like diabetes, heart disease and cancer. Non-communicable diseases now pose a greater health burden worldwide than infectious diseases.


The Sugar Content in Some Foods May Shock You! Taking a trip to your local grocer, you may be very surprised at what you see if you took a look at the nutritional information for some foods. Many items, which a lot of people assume are generally healthy, can contain a lot more sugar than you’d expect. The info-graphic, How Sugar Has Been Changing America, lists more than 10 food items which are surprisingly high in sugar. For example, it probably won’t come as much of a shock to learn that a can of Mountain Dew contains 46.5 grams of sugar. If you have ever tried one, you’d know that it is one surgery beverage! So how about a drink like Sobe Energize Green Tea? That sounds like a drink that should be relatively good for you right? In fact, a 20 ounce bottle of Sobe Energize Green Tea packs a whopping 61 grams of sugar! That is about the same as adding 15 sugar cubes to your tea! Pardon me, but would you like some tea with that sugar? Be sure to check out the info-graphic as it lists a number of other surprising food items that pack a surgery punch.

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When blood sugar is stable, your body is in balance and naturally releases what it doesn’t need like stored body fat, toxins and excess sodium. Stable blood sugar will also protect and increase your lean muscle mass to ignite your metabolism, eliminate carbohydrate and sugar cravings, boost your energy and help you to break through stubborn plateaus. Brown raw sugar is a natural sweetener developed from sugar crystals of molasses syrup. This is a good substitute for regular white sugar.

Notice in the chart that whenever you eat too many calories or too many carbohydrates in a meal, your blood sugar spikes and your body stores fat. The truth is, though many people eat “healthy”, they fail to eat “correctly” and inadvertently spike and crash their blood sugar levels all day long. 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ffoOeW5wZ9s&feature=player_embedded

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Countries With the Greatest Use of High-Fructose Corn Syrup Also Have More Diabetes

Countries With the Greatest Use of High-Fructose Corn Syrup Also Have More Diabetes | The dark side of sugar. Sweet in the beginning, bitter in the end. | Scoop.it
A study shows that, independent of obesity rates, countries with high per capita consumption of high fructose corn syrup have higher diabetes rates.
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Artificially sweet success at curbing childhood weight gain

Artificially sweet success at curbing childhood weight gain | The dark side of sugar. Sweet in the beginning, bitter in the end. | Scoop.it
Substituting sugar-sweetened drinks with artificially sweetened alternatives could help reduce weight gain in schoolchildren, research suggests.

 

The authors of a large, double-blind study, published online in The New England Journal of Medicine, found that children given sugar-free drinks gained less weight and body fat than those who drank regular sugar-containing drinks.

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6 Scary Side Effects of Sugar | Fitbie

6 Scary Side Effects of Sugar | Fitbie | The dark side of sugar. Sweet in the beginning, bitter in the end. | Scoop.it
Americans eat their weight in sugar each year.
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Sugar and Health Effects

Sugar and Health Effects | The dark side of sugar. Sweet in the beginning, bitter in the end. | Scoop.it
Sugar and health - What are the effects of high sugar consumption on the human body and is there cause for concern?
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Health Experts Agree on the Effects of Sugar | MTM Blog

Health Experts Agree on the Effects of Sugar | MTM Blog | The dark side of sugar. Sweet in the beginning, bitter in the end. | Scoop.it

With so much media attention on sugar-related stories, both prominent health experts and the alternative health community are emphasizing the negative effects of sugar.

Dr. Robert Lustig (Professor of Pediatrics in the Division of Endocrinology at the University of California) produced the video “Sugar: The Bitter Truth”. Dr. Lustig is a leading expert on sugar and childhood obesity and in his lecture, he claims that sugar is a toxic substance that impairs the body and that fructose is the top caloric source in the U.S. The average American consumes approximately 150 grams of sugar each day which is much higher than the acceptable daily amount of 25 grams of sugar recommended by experts.

 

Obesity is not the only effect of excessive sugar intake. In his article, “Experts agree – Sugar is a health destroyer”, writer Anthony Gucciardi states that “fructose has been found to raise uric acid levels, leading to decreased nitric oxide levels, elevated angiotensin levels, and smooth muscle cell contractions that lead to higher blood pressure and potential kidney damage. Higher uric acid levels have also been linked to low-level inflammation, which can lead to a large number of diseases. As a testament to the deteriorating health of the U.S. since the introduction of sugar into the primary diet of most citizens, uric acid levels among Americans have risen dramatically since the early half of the 20th century. In 1920, average uric acid levels were around 3.5 ml/dl. In sharp contrast, average uric acid levels in 1980 shot up to around 6.0 to 6.5 ml/dl. Uric acid levels above 5.5 mg per dl indicate an increased risk of developing hypertension, kidney disease, insulin resistance, fatty liver, obesity, diabetes, and a host of other conditions.”

 

Another relationship that is quite concerning is between cancer and the prolonged consumption of sugar. Lewis Cantley, the director of the Cancer Center at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center at Harvard Medical School, says that “as much as 80 percent of all cancers are ‘driven by either mutations or environmental factors that work to enhance or mimic the effect of insulin on the incipient tumor cells.’ This link between chronic sugar consumption and 80 percent of cancers is one that challenges the mainstream ideology of how nutrition affects the body. In addition, it is a link that must not be taken lightly.”

Sugar is now a main ingredient in the American diet and with a majority of calories coming from fructose, the medical community in large is beginning to question the impact of sugar on the human body.

 

To learn more about the effects of sugar, click here.

http://www.naturalnews.com/032327_sugar_health.html

 

 

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The Dangers of Sugars and 'Bad Fats' Explained | Idea Solar

The Dangers of Sugars and 'Bad Fats' Explained | Idea Solar | The dark side of sugar. Sweet in the beginning, bitter in the end. | Scoop.it
Sugars. Sugars are more than just the white grains you put in your coffee or tea. Sugars are also to be found in the caffeine in coffee, alcohol, honey, fruit juice without the pulp and peeled potatoes.
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How Sugar Destroys Your Health And Can Make You Desperate For Help Getting Pregnant | Natural Fertility Breakthrough

How Sugar Destroys Your Health And Can Make You Desperate For Help Getting Pregnant | Natural Fertility Breakthrough | The dark side of sugar. Sweet in the beginning, bitter in the end. | Scoop.it
Sugar is a silent killer, affecting so many aspects of your health, not just fertility.Below you will find a list of reasons why sugars and sweeteners of any kind would best be excluded from your day-to-day routine.
You may be saying, “Fine, I already know sugar is not good for me but I CAN’T HELP IT! I just have to eat it”. One of the main reasons for this is that sugar is INCREDIBLY addictive. The more you eat it, the more you want to eat it and the never-ending cycle goes on. There are a few good reasons why intense sugar cravings happen: nutrient deficiencies (particularly chromium, magnesium and zinc), unbalanced meals (i.e. not including enough fats and proteins), skipping meals, irregular eating times, consuming sugars and sweet foods daily (habit) etc. These are all physical reasons and there are probably as many, if not more, emotional reasons why we consciously or unconsciously perpetuate the cycle. There are the feelings we attach (or have attached whilst growing up) to eating sugar, such as feelings of comfort, security, love, and so on. Such feelings may have been established because of pleasant experiences you had around eating sugar, or because sugar was your main form of positive reassurance. Regardless, now is the time to separate such feelings from the act of eating sugar, which does not serve you well.
An emotional addiction to sugar (or other types of foods, or over-eating) should be worked through with the help of a health practitioner. A therapy called Emotional Freedom Technique is often very successful in this regard. A physical addiction can be resolved by taking nutrients that help balance your need for sugar by assisting the regulation of the centres for blood sugar control in the body.
So here you are! In addition to unbalancing the body’s homeostasis, excess sugar may result in a number of other significant consequences. The following is a listing of some of sugar’s metabolic consequences, as cited in a variety of medical journals and other scientific publications.
Excerpt from Lick The Sugar Habit, by Dr. Nancy Appleton (www.nancyappleton.com)
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Break a sugar addiction within a week using three easy steps

Break a sugar addiction within a week using three easy steps | The dark side of sugar. Sweet in the beginning, bitter in the end. | Scoop.it

                                                                                                  Thursday, September 27, 2012

 

by: Brad Chase


Refined sugar is a drug that is similar to opiates in its power to become addicted to it. The Journal of Psychoactive Drugs stated in a study published in 2010 that sugar releases euphoric endorphins in some people's brains in a manner very similar to that of certain drugs which are commonly abused.

 

"Sugar addiction" follows the same pathways in the brain that a habit-forming drug does. Fortunately, sugar cravings can be stopped within a week of withdrawing from the white crystals.

The entire scope of drug addiction has been observed in people with sugar addiction. There are cravings, an escalation of tolerance levels, and dramatic withdrawal symptoms associated with sugar addiction that parallel that of both prescription and non-prescription "street" drugs. In addition, sugar addicts often become narcotic addicts, according to the above study.

 

The study, performed at California State University, found that children of alcoholic parents often had a "sweet tooth," and were more likely to become alcoholics themselves when they became adults. There are also genetic markers connecting sugar addictions with alcoholism, bulimia, and obesity.

 

Raw, organic fruits and vegetables form the first step in breaking a sugar addiction

 

The first step in breaking a sugar addiction is to make sure all fruits and vegetables consumed are 100 percent organic. Organic fruits and vegetables are full of natural sugars, or complex carbohydrates. Not only does organic produce taste better, the complex carbohydrates break down slower than simple carbohydrates do. This means the body does not send "craving" messages as quickly to the brain.

 

Substitute pastries with whole grain bread and raw honey

 

While those on an ancestral diet may cringe at the suggestion, a person who is just beginning to transition from the Standard American Diet (SAD) by breaking a sugar addiction can dramatically reduce sugar cravings by eating a slice of homemade whole grain bread drizzled with raw,

 

unpasteurized local honey.

 

Whereas someone on the SAD might normally reach for a quart of their favorite ice cream and the better part of a bag of cookies for an evening snack, homemade bread with raw honey is a wiser, healthier choice.

 

According to MyFitnessPal.com, there are approximately 290 calories in just one cup of a commercial brand of vanilla ice cream, along with 16 grams of fat and 30 grams of refined sugar. By comparison, a 1.5 gram slice of homemade whole grain bread contains 100 calories, 1.5 grams fat, and 18 grams of complex carbohydrates.

 

Drizzling a whole tablespoon of raw honey onto the slice of bread adds 70 calories and 15 grams of sugar. Rather than eating 28 grams of refined sugar from a cup of vanilla ice cream alone, sugar cravings are reduced by eating 15 grams of raw honey.

 

In addition, the destructive chemicals in refined sugar are replaced with the scientifically proven anti-microbial, anti-oxidant and appetite-regulating benefits of raw honey.

Break the need for crunchy snacks with raw nuts and trail mixes

 

Raw nuts and seeds along with natural trail mixes made with dried, unsweetened fruit are perfect for the person who is breaking a sugar addiction. Raw nuts and seeds offer protein, energy, and healthy plant fats.

 

Trail mixes, as long as they do not contain added candy or sugar- sweetened fruit, contain an interesting combination of complex carbohydrates, proteins, and good fats which help tide an individual over until meal time. There is just enough natural sugar in trail mix to offer an energy boost without a sugar spike.

 

Sources:

 

Pubmed.gov, Journal of Psychoactive Drugs. .2010 Jun; 42(2):147-51. "Sweet preference, sugar addiction and the familial history of alcohol dependence: shared neural pathways and genes," by JL Fortuna.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20648910


MyFitnessPal.com, "Breyers Vanilla Ice Cream"

http://www.myfitnesspal.com/food/calorie-chart-nutrition-facts


Calorie Count. About. Com, "Calories in Really Raw Honey"

http://caloriecount.about.com/calories-really-raw-honey-i191541


Pubmed.gov, Biotechnology Research International. 2011; 2011: 917505. "Antibacterial Efficacy of Raw and Processed Honey." DP Mohapatra and V Thakur, et al.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3042689/


Pubmed.gov, Journal of the American Dietary Association. 2009 Jan; 109(1):64-71. "Total antioxidant content of alternatives to refined sugar." KM Phillips and MH Carlsen, et al.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19103324


Pubmed.gov, Journal of the American College of Nutrition. 2010 Oct; 29(5):482-93. "Effect of honey versus sucrose on appetite, appetite-regulating hormones, and post meal thermogenesis." DE Larson-Meyer and KS Willis, et al.
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21504975

 

About the author:


Brad Chase is the President of ProgressiveHealth.com. His website provides articles and natural remedies to help people solve their health concerns.


Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/037337_sugar_addiction_habits_raw_honey.html#ixzz27ztrriyB

 

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The Negative Effects of Sugar on Kids (VIDEO) - Huffington Post

The Negative Effects of Sugar on Kids (VIDEO) - Huffington Post | The dark side of sugar. Sweet in the beginning, bitter in the end. | Scoop.it
Dr Natasha discusses the negative effects too much sugar can have on a child.
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Is Alzheimers Caused By Too Much Sugar? How the American Diet Is as Bad for Our Brains as Our Bodies

Is Alzheimers Caused By Too Much Sugar? How the American Diet Is as Bad for Our Brains as Our Bodies | The dark side of sugar. Sweet in the beginning, bitter in the end. | Scoop.it

Mother Jones / By Tom Philpott

 

Is Alzheimers Caused By Too Much Sugar? How the American Diet Is as Bad for Our Brains as Our Bodies

 

Yet another reason to load up on fruit and veggies—and work to wrest federal farm policy (which encourages the production of cheap sweeteners and fats)—from the grip of agribusiness.


September 14, 2012 

 

The following article first appeared in Mother Jones . For more great content from Mother Jones, sign up for free email updates here.

Egged on by massive food-industry marketing budgets , Americans eat a lot of sugary foods. We know the habit is quite probably wrecking our bodies , triggering high rates of overweight and diabetes. Is it also wrecking our brains?

 

That's the disturbing conclusion emerging in a body of research linking Alzheimer's disease to insulin resistance—which is in turn linked to excess sweetener consumption . A blockbuster story in the Sept. 3 issue of the UK magazine The New Scientist teases out the connections.

Scientists have known for a while that insulin regulates blood sugar, "giving the cue for muscles, liver and fat cells to extract sugar from the blood and either use it for energy or store it as fat," New Scientist reports. Trouble begins when our muscle, fat, and liver cells stop responding properly to insulin—that is, they stop taking in glucose. This condition, known as insulin resistance and also pre-diabetes, causes the pancreas to produce excess amounts of insulin even as excess glucose builds up in the blood. Type 2 diabetes , in essence, is the chronic condition of excess blood glucose—its symptomsinclude frequent bladder infections, kidney, and skin infections, fatigue, excess hunger, and erectile dysfunction.

 

US Type 2 diabetes rates have tripled since 1980, New Scientist reports.

 

What's emerging, the magazine shows, is that insulin "also regulates neurotransmitters, like acetylcholine, which are crucial for memory and learning." That's not all: "And it is important for the function and growth of blood vessels, which supply the brain with oxygen and glucose. As a result, reducing the level of insulin in the brain can immediately impair cognition."

 

 So when people develop insulin resistance, New Scientist reports, insulin spikes "begin to overwhelm the brain, which can't constantly be on high alert," And then bad things happen: "Either alongside the other changes associated with type 2 diabetes, or separately, the brain may then begin to turn down its insulin signalling, impairing your ability to think and form memories before leading to permanent neural damage"—and eventually, Alzheimer's.

 

 Chillingly, scientists have been able to induce these conditions in lab animals. At her lab at Brown, scientist Suzanne de la Monte blocked insulin inflow to the brains of mice—and essentially induced Alzheimer's. When she examined their brains, here's what she found, as described by New Scientist:

 

 Areas associated with memory were studded with bright pink plaques, like rocks in a climbing wall, while many neurons, full to bursting point with a toxic protein, were collapsing and crumbling. As they disintegrated, they lost their shape and their connections with other neurons, teetering on the brink of death.

For a paper published this year, Rutgers researchers got a similar result on rabbits with induced diabetes.

 

There's also research tying brain dysfunction directly to excess sugar consumption. In a 2012 study, UCLA scientists fed rats a heavy ration of fructose (which makes up roughly a half of both table sugar and high-fructose corn syrup) and noted both insulin resistance and impaired brain function within six weeks. Interestingly, they found both insulin function and brain performance to improve in the sugar-fed rats when they were also fed omega-3 fatty acids. In other words, another quirk of the American diet, deficiency in omega-3 fatty acids, seems to make us more vulnerable to the onslaught of sweets.

 

Another facet of our diets, lots of cheap added fats , may also trigger insulin problems and brain dysfunction. New Scientist flags yet another recent study, this one from University of Washington researchers, finding that rats fed a high-fat diet for a year lost their ability to regulate insulin, developed diabetes, and showed signs of brain deterioration.

 

Altogether, the New Scientist story makes a powerful case that the standard American diet is as devastating for our brains as it is for our bodies. The situation is tragic:

 

In the US alone, 19 million people have now been diagnosed with the condition, while a further 79 million are considered "prediabetic", showing some of the early signs of insulin resistance. If Alzheimer's and type 2 diabetes do share a similar mechanism, levels of dementia may follow a similar trajectory as these people age.

Yet another reason to l oad up on fruit and veggies —and work to wrest federal farm policy (which encourages the production of cheap sweeteners and fats )—from the grip of agribusiness .

 

Grist staff writer Tom Philpott farms and cooks at Maverick Farms, a sustainable-agriculture nonprofit and small farm in the Blue Ridge Mountains of North Carolina.

 

http://www.stumbleupon.com/su/1q6bMV/:1ZGgOMjGA:c@5HI_z5/www.alternet.org/food/alzheimers-caused-too-much-sugar-how-american-diet-bad-our-brains-our-bodies?akid=9402.293972.NSCEXd&rd=1&src=newsletter711283&t=3/

 

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